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Penn Sediment Dynamics Laboratory (PennSeD): Experimental geophysics, with a focus on geomorphology (the "science of scenery").  Our research focuses on the spatial and temporal evolution of patterns that emerge at the interface of fluid and sediment on Earth and planetary surfaces. Our group uses laboratory experiments, combined with field work and theory, to elucidate the minimum number of ingredients that are required to explain physical phenomena. Particular foci include: granular physics of fluid-driven (water and wind) sediment transport; controls on the shape and size of sediment grains; landform dynamics including dunes, river channels, deltas and fans; stochastic and nonlinear transport processes; and landscape response to dynamic boundary conditions such as climate. We are based in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at University of Pennsylvania. Douglas Jerolmack is the lab director.  (River photo: Ben Kimball, www.nhdfl.org; Experiment sketch: Sediment Experimentalists, workspace.earthcube.org/sen)

This page serves to provide information to the outside world about our group and its activities, and also for sharing information within the group.

Prospective PhD students:
If you're interested in joining the team, please contact Prof. Douglas Jerolmack.


Current Projects
(for more information on each project, please follow link to researcher site. Click on images - some are movies!)


https://sites.google.com/site/pennsed/home/Laminar.gif?attredirects=0

Laminar Flume/Granular Physics/Bimodal transport
Researchers: Behrooz Ferdowsi and Carlos Ortiz
Granular physics of hillslope creep, avalanches and landsliding 
Researcher: Behrooz Ferdowsi and Carlos Ortiz
 

Pebble Abrasion
Researcher: Kim Miller
 

White Sands, NM
Researcher: Sam Shaw
 

Above Threshold Equilibrium Channels
Researcher: Gerard Salter
 
Aggregation and transport of asbestos particles
Researcher: Lei Wu



Previous Research Projects

Alluvial Fan Experiments

Alluvial Fan Experiments.
Researcher: Meredith Reitz

Quantifying Bedload using Tagged Tracer Particles 
Researcher: Colin Philips