Publications   

 


David S. Pedulla 

Department of Sociology, Stanford University

Articles & Book Chapters

Pedulla, David S. 2016. "Penalized or Protected? Gender and the Consequences of Nonstandard and Mismatched Employment Histories." American Sociological Review 81(2):262-289.

Thébaud, Sarah, and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2016. "Masculinity and the Stalled Revolution: How Gender Ideologies and Norms Shape Young Men's Responses to Work-Family Policies." Gender & Society 30(4):590-617.

Deterding, Nicole M., and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2016. "Educational Authority in the 'Open Door' Marketplace: Labor Market Consequences of For-profit, Nonprofit, and Fictional Educational Credentials." Sociology of Education 89(3):155-170. [Lead Article]

Pedulla, David S.,
 and Sarah Thébaud (equal authorship). 2015. "Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint." American Sociological Review 80(1):116-139.

Pager, Devah, and David S. Pedulla. 2015. "Race, Self-Selection, and the Job Search Process." American Journal of Sociology 120(4):1005-1054. [Lead Article]

Pedulla, David S.
 2014. “The Positive Consequences of Negative Stereotypes: Race, Sexual Orientation, and the Job Application Process.” Social Psychology Quarterly 77(1):75-94.

Owens, Lindsay A., and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2014. "Material Welfare and Changing Political Preferences: The Case of Support for Redistributive Social Policies." Social Forces 92(3):1087-1113.


Pedulla, David S.
2012. "To Be Young and Unemployed."
 New Labor Forum 21(3):26-36.

Pedulla, David S., and Katherine S. Newman. 2011. "The Family and Community Impacts of Underemployment." In Underemployment: Psychological, Economic, and Social Challenges, ed. Douglas C. Maynard and Daniel C. Feldman. New York: Springer.

O'Brien, Rourke, and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2010. "Beyond The Poverty Line.Stanford Social Innovation Review 8(4):30-35.

Pager, Devah, Bruce Western, and David S. Pedulla. 2009. "Employment Discrimination and the Changing Landscape of Low-Wage Labor Markets.The University of Chicago Legal Forum 317-345.