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TOP ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

A mass protest in New York City

Why we're still marching

The 50th anniversary commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington has "the fierce urgency of now,"thanks to the not-guilty verdict in Sanford, Fla.

STATEMENT

The military's new massacres

Scores of people are dead in Cairo and across Egypt as the military escalates its deadly crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood.

ANALYSISPANOS PETROU

The battle for SYRIZA goes on

The leadership prevailed on many proposals during SYRIZA's first congress, but its attempt to stifle left-wing opposition didn't succeed.

REVIEWRAGINA JOHNSON

Hollywood's Native sideshow

In the end, the new film version of The Lone Ranger suffers from the same racist stereotypes as the old Westerns.

COMMENT

Solidarity is the key at BART

BART workers will need your support if they return to the picket line--and a victory for them will help all working people.

COMMENTMICHELE BOLLINGER

The final act of the revolution

By October 1917, the unstable situation of dual power--the workers councils versus the Provisional Government--had come to a head.

COMMENTNICOLE COLSON

Stealing Bradley Manning’s life

A military judge has found Bradley Manning guilty of almost every charge--but the real crime is locking up someone who exposed U.S. atrocities.

REPORTANDERSON BEAN

Bradley should be free

Some 200 activists from various cities gathered in Washington, D.C., for a rally in support of whistleblower Bradley Manning.

COMMENTJEN ROESCH

The making of a racist travesty

From the behavior of cops and prosecutors to the media hysteria, the "Baby Santiago" case has the hallmarks of a racist frame-up.

REPORTYONI GOLIJOV

Keep fighting for Ramarley

The family of Ramarley Graham, a Black teenager killed by New York City police, is vowing to continue the fight for justice.

COMMENTDON LASH

Why is Dainell Simmons dead?

A New York man with developmental disabilities died after police used stun guns and pepper spray during a struggle.

COMMENTDAN RIAZANOV

Taking action against Chevron

Smoke billows from the fire at a Chevron refinery in Richmond (Alex Tafla)

A year following an oil refinery fire in Richmond, Calif., activists are organizing against pollution and climate change.

ANALYSISECOSOCIALIST NETWORK

A social and ecological tragedy

The oil train catastrophe in Quebec is a symptom of more systemic problems--the drive for profits and more reliance on oil.

REPORT

Putting the heat on Obama

Some 1,000 people rallied near the White House to keep the pressure on Barack Obama to protect the environment.

Two Trayvon Martin Events in Portland Offer Public Discussion of Issues, Rights


 

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Heightened need for dialogue drives participation in Civil Rights discussions for both adults and children


Of The Skanner News


July 30, 2013


A young boy defiantly holds a sign declaring "No More Stolen Lives" at a rally at Westlake Park in Seattle, Sunday, July 14 to protest the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin. Over 500 people showed up at the rally and march. Susan Fried photo Two Portland forums, this week and next, offer locals a chance to talk about what the George Zimmerman acquittal in the Trayvon Martin killing means to them.


The first, held Tuesday at Portland Community College Cascade Campus, was hosted by the McKenzie River Gathering Foundation, a grant making organization that supports social justice and community organizations around the state.


The event featured Rep. Lew Frederick; social and racial justice activist Kathleen Saadat; and Portland Black PFLAG organizer Khalil Edwards. It linked the big three Civil Rights issues that have been in the news lately: two tragedies -- the Zimmerman verdict, the weakening of the Voting Rights Act; and one victory -- the Supreme Court's ruling legalizing same-gender marriage.


Also, coming up Tuesday, Aug. 6, 6:30-8:30 p.m., in the Jefferson High School cafeteria, the Portland Public Schools Office of Equity and its new program RACE TALKS 2 is holding “Trayvon Martin’s Death: A Catalyst for Change.”


MRG Foundation Executive Director Sharon Gary-Smith says pre-registration for the Tuesday panel event almost filled the hall before it started.


“There has been a lot of response to not only the defeat of the key components of the Voting Rights Act, but there’s also been disappointment, anguish and organizing around the death of Trayvon Martin,” she says.


“We saw that there was an important conversation that needed to be had – a critical conversation as community.”


Gary-Smith says the MRG event brings together an array of significant Civil Rights milestones that all happened in quick succession over the past few weeks: The U.S. Supreme Court’s strike-down of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the Court’s nullification of the Defense of Marriage Act, paving the way for same-sex marriage around the United States; and Zimmerman’s acquittal in Martin’s death.


The Tuesday night event poses these questions: What are the connections between these seemingly separate events? Why should these setbacks in our quest for justice matter to Oregonians? And, how do we channel our confusion, frustration, passion, and even anger into a broad movement for social change?


“A lot of our allies might think African Americans are the people who are primarily affected by the Voting Rights Act,” she said. “We wanted to raise it up because we think it is a critical rail of foundation for all our rights as citizens in America.


“The right to vote, to vote for democratic ideals, the right to exercise your participation, your civic engagement, in crafting and working towards the country we all deserve -- we didn’t think it was elevated enough,” she says.


“And truthfully, it came just after the appropriate striking down of the Defense of Marriage Act, where there was a lot of joy, jubilation, celebration, communities all over. And then came this striking down of the key underpinning of the Voting Rights and it stayed only for a moment in the public’s attention. It wasn’t twittered about after a short period of time, the media didn’t talk about the significant implications. So the assumption is, that was just us.


“We want to talk about that and how we have to make ‘together’ be about unity.”


At the Tuesday, Aug. 6 event at the Jefferson High School cafeteria, listen to community organizer Teressa Raiford talk about the Zimmerman verdict, and catch the first frames of her film-in-progress, "Respect My Gangstah," about her experiences connected to gangs, drugs, and attitudes about black on black crime.


The event is open to all ages, and is free of charge. Part of the presentation is about volunteering with local youth programs, and participants can sign up to do that there.


Local youth groups represented there so far include Self-Enhancement Inc., SEI; EMBODI; the Robotics Program; the Youth Aviation Program and more.   


Audience members will have a chance to discuss the topic in a safe environment under the guidance of small group dialogue facilitators provided by Uniting to Understand Racism, the City of Portland’s Intergroup Dialogue Program and Resolutions Northwest.


RACE TALKS 2 is an off-shoot of RACE TALKS: Uniting to Break the Chains of Racism, An Opportunity for Dialogue held monthly the second Tuesday of each month in the McMenamins Kennedy School Gym, from 7-9 p.m.  


RACE TALKS 2, sponsored by Portland Public School’s Office of Equity, is held in Jefferson High School’s cafeteria, 5210 N. Kerby Ave. between Killingsworth & Alberta in the Cafeteria, 6:30-8:30 p.m.TOPIC: ENVIRONMENT

ANALYSISPETER RUGH

This land is gas land

New federal regulations proposed by the Obama administration could spread energy company fracking to public and tribal lands.

COMMENTMARK STEEL

Baby born in London

But not just any baby, as the hyperventilating media of Britain and beyond assured us in their wall-to-wall coverage.

COMMENTEAMONN MCCANN

Is it time for all of us to move to North Korea?

Where else were people protected from the downpour of drivel that greeted the birth of a boy to the Baroness Carrickfergus?

FEATURED VIDEO

Glenn Greenwald speaks out atSocialism 2013 viaWeAreMany.org

COMMENTLANCE SELFA

The strangling of Detroit

Downtown Detroit

The state of Michigan's one-two blow for Detroit--emergency management and bankruptcy--will make the lives of hundreds of thousands worse.

COLUMN: DAVE ZIRIN

The Red Wings and the vultures

One day after Detroit filed for bankruptcy, state officials backed a plan to spend public money on a new hockey arena.

COMMENTXIAN BARRETT

I'll still be teaching next year

One of the more than 2,100 teachers and school staff laid off in Chicago talks about his continuing hopes for the struggle.

ANALYSISPETER RUGH

A threat to Brooklyn's health

Attempts to close Long Island College Hospital are causing health care chaos--but they're also hardening the resistance.

REPORTDAVE WELCH

We can't lose the post office

Big business, with the aid of Congress, is out to dismantle the U.S. Postal Service--but a fightback is underway.

In depth feature on The Struggle Against Racism

We have to win justice for Trayvon

Trayvon Martin is dead because he was a young Black man walking where someone thought he shouldn't--proving that racism is alive and well.

COMMENTLEE SUSTAR

The many other Trayvons

The death of unarmed African Americans at the hands of police and racists remains routine today--but a new movement is saying: "Enough."

ROUNDTABLE

What every Black man must learn

SW contributors remember their experiences with "the talk"--when family or friends tried to prepare them for a lifetime of dealing with racism and the police.

COMMENTKHURY PETERSEN-SMITH

We are all still Trayvon Martin

The murder of a 17-year-old in Florida one year ago shattered the idea that the U.S. had become, since the election of a Black president, a post-racial society.

SPEECHBRIAN JONES

Racism lives on in a "color-blind" society

We're told that we live in a "post-racial" society, but racism is alive and well in the U.S.--and benefiting the capitalist system in important ways.

SPEECHKEEANGA-YAMAHTTA TAYLOR

Where does the struggle go next?

George Zimmerman may have pulled the trigger, but centuries of slavery, legalized discrimination and institutional racism provided the gun.

The Struggle Against Racism

Thousands came to Sanford for a demonstration to demand justice for Trayvon Martin (Gary W. Green | MCT/Newscom)

Read a collection of SW articles about the Trayvon Martin case, the new civil rights movement that is demanding justice and the political backdrop to this electrifying struggle.

COLUMN: DAVE ZIRIN

Is the NFL really this stupid?

NFL teams are thinking about hiring police "experts" on gangs to examine the tattoos on NFL players. Really?

COMMENTDEEPA KUMAR

Liberals and the security state

Many supporters of Barack Obama cheer him on for carrying out policies that they once criticized George W. Bush for.

COMMENTNICOLE COLSON

The railroading of Bradley Manning

As a court-martial draws to a close, prosecutors are trying to make sure Bradley Manning will never be free again.

COMMENTCHUCK STEMKE

Why is Bob Filner still in office?

San Diego's supposedly progressive Mayor Bob Filner has been exposed as a notorious sexual harasser--but some supporters are still standing by him.

Find out about the activities of the International Socialist Organization
REPORTPATRICK O. STRICKLAND

Fighting the Prawer Plan

Thousands protested across Israel and the occupied territories to oppose a new plan for dispossessing the Palestinians.

COMMENTPAUL D'AMATO

The party and the revolution

The Bolsheviks became a mass party in the course of the revolution, winning the allegiance of Russia's most militant workers.

COMMENTALEXANDER BILLET

Music stands for Trayvon

From angry posts to concert dedications to a possible boycott of Florida, musicians have reacted to the Zimmerman verdict.

COLUMN: DAVE ZIRIN

Slandering Oday Aboushi

Yahoo! Sports writer Adam Waksman says he's exposing anti-Semitism. But the only thing he's exposing is his own racism.

NUESTRA OPINIÓN

La lucha inmigrante

¿Aprobará el Congreso una reforma migratoria? Quizás. ¿Habrá justicia para los indocumentados? No. ¿Continúa la lucha? ¡Un chingo!

Rebelión en Catatumbo

Protestas en la región agrícola del Catatumbo, Colombia, arrojan luz sobre el desprecio del gobierno hacia el campesinado colombiano.

Lo dicho, lo hecho y el trecho

Lo dicho por Barack Obama acerca del veredicto Zimmerman fue notable, pero también fue notable lo que no dijo acerca del racismo.

COMMENTKEEANGA-YAMAHTTA TAYLOR

Race in the Obama era

The election of the first Black president was historic, but Black America continues to face unemployment, poverty and oppression.

Actions are louder than words

President Obama speaks at a White House press conference (White House)

Barack Obama's comments on the Zimmerman verdict were notable for what he said--but also what he didn't say about institutionalized racism.

Can animals be "liberated?"

There is a big difference between animal welfare and humane treatment--and the idea animal "liberation."

On humans and animals

We can't talk about "animal liberation" without seeing the relationship between humans and animals as rooted in social relations.

A verse for Trayvon

On July 17, I attended a rally for Trayvon Martin, and was able to contribute a verse that I wrote the day before to the crowd.

Stand up for Bradley Manning

Demonstrations are being planned worldwide for July 27 to show solidarity with whistleblower Bradley Manning.

Socialists and animal liberation

The socialist left remains particularly inhospitable for those concerned with animal domestication.

Views in brief

Condemning prisoners to illness | Fighting for Trayvon in London | What "redneck" doesn't explain | Baseball, drugs and crime

Syndicate content
http://my.opera.com/WritingResource.org/blog/show.dml/79521512

"Often the best source of information about waste, fraud, and abuse in government is an existing government employee committed to public integrity and willing to speak out. Such acts of courage and patriotism, which can sometimes save lives and often save taxpayer dollars, should be encouraged rather than stifled. We need to empower federal employees as watchdogs of wrongdoing and partners in performance. Barack Obama will strengthen whistleblower laws to protect federal workers who expose waste, fraud, and abuse of authority in government. Obama will ensure that federal agencies expedite the process for reviewing whistleblower claims and whistleblowers have full access to courts and due process."

~Barack Obama when running for office....
Now it is time for Obama to Walk the Talk! 

ny_1555Two Trayvon Martin Events in Portland Offer Public Discussion of Issues, Rights

Heightened need for dialogue drives participation in Civil Rights discussions for both adults and children

Of The Skanner News

July 30, 2013

A young boy defiantly holds a sign declaring "No More Stolen Lives" at a rally at Westlake Park in Seattle, Sunday, July 14 to protest the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin. Over 500 people showed up at the rally and march. Susan Fried photo
Two Portland forums, this week and next, offer locals a chance to talk about what the George Zimmerman acquittal in the Trayvon Martin killing means to them.

The first, held Tuesday at Portland Community College Cascade Campus, was hosted by the McKenzie River Gathering Foundation, a grant making organization that supports social justice and community organizations around the state.

The event featured Rep. Lew Frederick; social and racial justice activist Kathleen Saadat; and Portland Black PFLAG organizer Khalil Edwards. It linked the big three Civil Rights issues that have been in the news lately: two tragedies -- the Zimmerman verdict, the weakening of the Voting Rights Act; and one victory -- the Supreme Court's ruling legalizing same-gender marriage.

Also, coming up Tuesday, Aug. 6, 6:30-8:30 p.m., in the Jefferson High School cafeteria, the Portland Public Schools Office of Equity and its new program RACE TALKS 2 is holding “Trayvon Martin’s Death: A Catalyst for Change.”

MRG Foundation Executive Director Sharon Gary-Smith says pre-registration for the Tuesday panel event almost filled the hall before it started.

“There has been a lot of response to not only the defeat of the key components of the Voting Rights Act, but there’s also been disappointment, anguish and organizing around the death of Trayvon Martin,” she says.

“We saw that there was an important conversation that needed to be had – a critical conversation as community.”

Gary-Smith says the MRG event brings together an array of significant Civil Rights milestones that all happened in quick succession over the past few weeks: The U.S. Supreme Court’s strike-down of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the Court’s nullification of the Defense of Marriage Act, paving the way for same-sex marriage around the United States; and Zimmerman’s acquittal in Martin’s death.

The Tuesday night event poses these questions: What are the connections between these seemingly separate events? Why should these setbacks in our quest for justice matter to Oregonians? And, how do we channel our confusion, frustration, passion, and even anger into a broad movement for social change?

“A lot of our allies might think African Americans are the people who are primarily affected by the Voting Rights Act,” she said. “We wanted to raise it up because we think it is a critical rail of foundation for all our rights as citizens in America.

“The right to vote, to vote for democratic ideals, the right to exercise your participation, your civic engagement, in crafting and working towards the country we all deserve -- we didn’t think it was elevated enough,” she says.

“And truthfully, it came just after the appropriate striking down of the Defense of Marriage Act, where there was a lot of joy, jubilation, celebration, communities all over. And then came this striking down of the key underpinning of the Voting Rights and it stayed only for a moment in the public’s attention. It wasn’t twittered about after a short period of time, the media didn’t talk about the significant implications. So the assumption is, that was just us.

“We want to talk about that and how we have to make ‘together’ be about unity.”

At the Tuesday, Aug. 6 event at the Jefferson High School cafeteria, listen to community organizer Teressa Raiford talk about the Zimmerman verdict, and catch the first frames of her film-in-progress, "Respect My Gangstah," about her experiences connected to gangs, drugs, and attitudes about black on black crime.

The event is open to all ages, and is free of charge. Part of the presentation is about volunteering with local youth programs, and participants can sign up to do that there.

Local youth groups represented there so far include Self-Enhancement Inc., SEI; EMBODI; the Robotics Program; the Youth Aviation Program and more.   

Audience members will have a chance to discuss the topic in a safe environment under the guidance of small group dialogue facilitators provided by Uniting to Understand Racism, the City of Portland’s Intergroup Dialogue Program and Resolutions Northwest.

RACE TALKS 2 is an off-shoot of RACE TALKS: Uniting to Break the Chains of Racism, An Opportunity for Dialogue held monthly the second Tuesday of each month in the McMenamins Kennedy School Gym, from 7-9 p.m.  

RACE TALKS 2, sponsored by Portland Public School’s Office of Equity, is held in Jefferson High School’s cafeteria, 5210 N. Kerby Ave. between Killingsworth & Alberta in the Cafeteria, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
  • ,,, the persistent dangers of right-wing extremism." - Charles Kaiser, author of 1968 in America and The Gay Metropolis

    Admission: $5 -20; no one turned away for lack of funds
    Doors open at 6:30 PM
    Sponsored by Alliance for Democracy, Economic Justice Action Group of First Unitarian

    http://www.afd-pdx.org/alliance-for-democracy-sponsored-events.html






  • Two Trayvon Martin Events in Portland Offer Public Discussion of Issues, Rights

    Heightened need for dialogue drives participation in Civil Rights discussions for both adults and children … To check it out click here

    http://youtu.be/fdDCxtgen2w

    https://sites.google.com/site/pdxactivismnews/if-you-want-peace-work-for-justice



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