Washington Irving
 

 

Washington Irving (1783 – 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. He was best known for his short stories "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle".

He was also a prolific essayist, biographer and historian.

Irving was one of the first American writers to earn acclaim in Europe. 

Irving was also the U.S. minister to Spain 1842–1846.

 Click Here for---->Rare and Unique Hard Cover Books and Paperback Books for Sale on Ebay

From LibriVox:

1a. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow -  The quiet Dutch community of Sleepy Hollow lay in the Adirondack mountains on the western shore of the mighty Hudson River in America’s colonial period. The solitude of the woods was breathtaking, and not even a schoolmaster was immune from the eerie miasma which everyone knew permeated the dense forest. Written in 1820, Washington Irving’s The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow has become a classic of American literature, and has been retold in many different ways. Here is the original, from Irving’s own hand.

1b. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (another version) - Everyone knows the story of the Headless Horseman but perhaps you, like me, did not remember what a marvelous story teller Washington Irving was. He observed human nature closely and like any good humorist, lets us laugh at our own silly and superstitious sides through the joy of having strangers be the ones to display them. 

2. Old Christmas - A tale of the quaint and old English traditions of celebrating Christmas. Irving travels to the English countryside and meets an old schoolmate, who invites him home to spend Christmas at the family estate.

3. Rip Van Winkle  (15th story from short story collection 038)

4. Wolfert Webber or Golden Dream (12th and 13th story in Best Mystery and Detective Stories - Vol 1)

5. Adventures of the Black Fisherman (14th and 15th story in Best Mystery and Detective Stories - Vol 1)

6. Wouter Van Twiller by Washington Irving (22nd short story in Wit and Humor of America # 01)
    7. The Sketch Book and Other Tales - Apart from "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" - the pieces which made both Irving and The Sketch Book famous - other tales include "Roscoe", "The Broken Heart", "The Art of Book-making", "A Royal Poet", "The Spectre Bridegroom", "Westminster Abbey", "Little Britain", and "John Bull". His stories were highly influenced by German folktales, with "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" being inspired by a folktale recorded by Karl Musaus. 

    8.  The Adventure of the Mason by Washington Irving (19th story in Short Ghost and Horror Story # 17)

    9.  The Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent. - This book (1824) is a compilation of eight humorous and observational letters written by Washington Irving, under the pseudonym, Jonathan Oldstyle. These eight letters and one additional were first published as a series of "Letters to the Editor" of the New York paper, The Morning Chronicle, between 1802 and 1803. In them Old style skewered the local New York social scene on the topics of etiquette, marriage, fashion, and other particulars of human interaction.

    10.  The Alhambra: A Series of Tales and Sketches of the Moors and Spaniards - This is a collection of essays, verbal sketches, and stories.  In 1828, Washington Irving traveled from Madrid, where he had been staying, to Granada, Spain. At first sight, he described it as "a most picturesque and beautiful city, situated in one of the loveliest landscapes that I have ever seen." He immediately asked the then-governor of the historic Alhambra Palace as well as the archbishop of Granada for access to the palace, which was granted because of Irving's celebrity status. Aided by a 35-year old guide named Mateo Ximenes, Irving was inspired by his experience to write Tales of the Alhambra.  " A commemorative plaque in Spanish at the Alhambra reads, "Washington Irving wrote his Tales of Alhambra in these rooms in 1829". The book was instrumental in reintroducing the Alhambra to Western audiences. 

    11. The Specter Bridegroom by Washington Irving (16th Story in Short Ghost & Horror Collection #19)

    12. The Adventure of the German Student by Washington Irving (16th story in Ghost Story Collection # 20)

    13.  The Bold Dragoon by Washington Irving (18th story in Short Ghost Stories # 21)

    14.  Knickerbockers History of New York - Washington Irving completed his first major work, a satire of contemporary local history and politics entitled A History of New-York from the Beginning of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty, by Diedrich Knickerbocker in 1809.


    16. Old Christmas From the Sketch Book of Washington Irving - Washington Irving's Old Christmas tells of an American's travels through England during the Christmas season. Through a chance meeting with an old friend he is able to experience Christmas in a stately manor house. Through his eyes as a houseguest he glimpses the uniquely British customs and celebrations of Christmas as it would have been experienced during the Middle Ages, rather than in the early 19th century.

    17.  Four Selected Classics of Washington Irving - This collection includes two of his most famous works: "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." In these two classics, set in New York, Irving brings the legends and daily goings on of the early settlers to life in vivid color and detail. 
    Additionally, two of Irving's essays about England, both rural and metropolitan, round out his Trans-Atlantic descriptions of life in a bygone era.  These remaining 2 stories are “Rural Life in England”  and “The Boar's Head Tavern, Eastcheap.”

    18.  Washington Irving in London - Washington Irving established himself as one of early America's most treasured writers. His wit and satirical voice are the hallmark of his writing. Irving had the extraordinary ability to paint a picture in words on the canvas of the printed page. Although an American, he spent a good deal of time traveling in England and memorializing his experiences in some of the essays chosen for this collection. With an emphasis on his time spent in London, the works include his observations on such diverse subjects as Westminster Abbey, British antiques and how one spends a Sunday in London. This collection brings to life the London of a bygone era as seen through the eyes of a keen writer and observer of life
     
    19. Bracebridge HallFamed American humorist and essayist Washington Irving published a series of short pieces entitled "The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gentleman" in 1815. Included in that collection were the chapters which later formed the standalone work "Old Christmas." This wonderful book introduced the world to Bracebridge Hall, the ancestral home of the Bracebridges, an old English family that lived according to the customs of those who were "unto the manor born." "Bracebridge Hall" is a follow-up to "Old Christmas" which looks at the lifestyle of the rich, country dwellers, their servants, friends and neighbors. The daily lives and adventures of this peculiar population of early 1800's England forms the foundation upon which the episodes explored in "Bracebridge Hall" is built. Washington Irving wrote the book based upon his own experiences visiting England and the very real Bracebridge Family with whom he spent much time.

    20. Abbotsford and Newstead Abbey -  Irving first chronicles his visit to Abbotsford, the home of Sir Walter Scott, whom he notes had not, at the time of his stay, yet received his title of “baronet.” Scott gives Irving a personal tour not only of his home but of the surrounding neighborhoods and landmarks that are a part of Abbotsford. We get a unique glimpse into the private life of the celebrated writer and the reverence the people of his time held him in.
    Irving next moves on to Newstead Abbey, the home of the then-late Lord Byron. His travels are guided by Colonel Wildman, the individual who purchased Newstead Abbey following Byron’s death, and who restored the building to its former glory. In this portion of the book we learn of the fantastic and bizarre Byron family and its connection to Robin Hood and the famed locales of Sherwood Forest and Nottingham.

    21More Selected Classics of Washington Irving  Washington Irving spent many years in Europe and kept records of his observations, which formed the basis of such classics as "Old Christmas," "Bracebridge Hall" and "Tales of a Traveler." This volume is the latest entry in a series of collected essays written during these early years. The fragility of the heart forms the basis of many of these short stories. Irving handles the issues of love, heartbreak and death in a caring and compassionate way.

    =======================================================

    From Archive.Org - Audio:

     1.  Rip Van Winkle

     

    1.  Seeing Ear Theater – Sleepy Hollow: The Legend - Go to 14th Audio

    ==========================================================

    Washington Irving   (2nd essay by John Macy’s Spirit of American Literature)

    =========================================================