Jack London

 

Jack London (18761916), was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and other books. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing.

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From LibriVox:

  1. Call of the Wild   (Buck - a St. Bernard/Collie mix, is abducted and sold to a trainer of sled dogs in Alaska)
  2. The Faith of Man  (Collection of short stories)
  3. The Sea Wolf   (The Sea-Wolf introduces Jack London's most memorable, fully realized character, Wolf Larsen)
  4. The Scarlet Plague   (Science fiction set in a post-apocalyptic future of 2072, 60 years after a scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. )
  5. To Build a Fire    (19th Short story that should be read during a camping trip in the snow)
  6. White Fang  (The tale of a wild dog born in the wild and eventually brought to civilization)
  7. The People of the Abyss - Jack London lived for a time within the grim and grimy world of the East End of London, where half a million people scraped together hardly enough on which to survive. Even if they were able to work, they were paid only enough to allow them a pitiful existence. He grew to know and empathise with these forgotten (or ignored) people as he spoke with them and tasted the workhouse, life on the streets, … and the food, which was cheap, barely nutritious, and foul.
  8. The Leopard Man   (10th Story in Short Story Collection 003)
  9. The Cruise of the Snark  (A memoir of Jack London’s 1907-1909 voyage across the Pacific)
  10. Goliath  (4th story in Short Science Fiction # 12)
  11. The Shadow and the Flash   (4th story in Short Science Fiction # 12)
  12. Confession  (6th story in Short Story Collection 006)
  13. Love of Life   (14th story in Short Story Collection 006)
  14. The Sun-Dog Trial   (8th story in Short Story Collection 009)
  15. The Story of Keesh  (8th story in Short Story Collection 023)
  16. All Gold Canyon   (1st story in Short Story Collection 038)
  17. The Law of Life   (10th story in Short Story Collection 038)
  18. The Francis Spaight  (6th story from Ghost short Stories 005)
  19. Moon Face  (7th story in short story collection 39)
  20. Typhone off the Coast of Japan  (12th story in short story collection 30)
  21. The Heathen  (10th story in Short Story Collection # 040)
  22. The House of Mapuhi  (11th story in Short Story Collection # 040)
  23. That Dead Men Rise Up Never   (19th story in Short Story Collection # 040)
  24. A Piece of Steak  (1st story in Short Story Collection 41)
  25. An Adventure in the Upper Sea  (1st story in Short Story Collection # 43)
  26. That Spot (15th  story in short story collection 44)
  27. The Golden Poppy (10th story in Multilingual 1910 Collection)
  28. A Thousand Deaths  (16th story from Ghost Collection # 10) 
  29. The Hobo and the Fairy (6th story in Short Story Collection # 45)
  30. Nam-Bok the Unveracious (11th story in Short Story Collection # 45)
  31. Told in the Drooling Ward (16th story in Short Story Collection # 45)
  32. Flush of Gold (7th story in Short Story Collection # 46)
  33. Lost Face (11th  story in Short Story Collection # 46)
  34. The Passing of Marcus O’Brien (16th story in Short Story Collection # 46)
  35. The Wit of Porportuk  (20th  story in Short Story Collection # 46)
  36. Yellow Handkerchief (20th story in Short Story Collection # 45)
  37. The Iron Heel - A dystopian novel about the terrible oppressions of an American oligarchy at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, and the struggles of a socialist revolutionary movement.
  38. Martin Eden - Martin Eden (1909) is a novel about a struggling young writer.  Jack London wrote, "One of my motifs, in this book, was an attack on individualism (in the person of the hero). I must have bungled, for not a single reviewer has discovered it."   While some readers believe there is some resemblance between them, an important difference between Jack London and Martin Eden is that Martin Eden rejects socialism (attacking it as 'slave morality'), and relies on a Nietzschean individualism. 
  39. The Banks of the Sacramento - (1st story in Short Story Collection # 47)
  40. Nothing Ever Came of Anything -  (8th story in Short Story Collection # 47)
  41. When the World Was Young -  (19th story in Short Story Collection # 47)
  42. Just Meat - (9th story from Short Story Collection # 48)
  43. Make Westing - (10th story from Short Story Collection # 48)
  44. A Nose For The King - (12th story from Short Story Collection # 48)
  45. A Wicked Woman  -  In these days of graphic rap lyrics it is hard to comprehend that young women were once very naive about love and sex. Meet Loretta, a young woman very much in the shadow of her sister Daisy. Loretta is sure she has already yielded her precious rose to Billy. Her new love finds Loretta isn't as wicked as she thinks.
  46. The Mutiny of the Elsinore - This is the story of a voyage of a sailing ship from Baltimore to Seattle, east-to-west around Cape Horn in the winter. It is set in 1913 and the glory days of “wooden ships and iron men” are long over. The Elsinore is a four-masted iron sailing vessel carrying a cargo of 5000 tons of coal. She has a “bughouse” crew of misfits and incompetents.

  41.  The Game - Jack London wrote at least four stories about boxing; A Piece of Steak (1909), The Mexican (1911), The Abysmal Brute (1911), and The Game (1905). The Game is told, in part, from the point of view of a woman, the fiancée of one of the competitors. This is to be his last fight and they are to be married on the morrow. Against her better judgment, she agrees to watch the bout.

42.  The Mutiny of the Elsinore - This is the story of a voyage of a sailing ship from Baltimore to Seattle, east-to-west around Cape Horn in the winter. It is set in 1913 and the glory days of “wooden ships and iron men” are long over. The Elsinore is a four-masted iron sailing vessel carrying a cargo of 5000 tons of coal. She has a “bughouse” crew of misfits and incompetents.  This book was published in 1915 and some actions of some of the characters seem odd to us today.

43.  To Build A Fire (1908 version) by Jack London  (17th story in Short Story Collection # 51) 

44.  The Jacket (or The Star Rover) - This book was published under the name of "The Jacket" in the UK and "The Star Rover" in the US. A framing story is told in the first person by Darrell Standing, a university professor serving life imprisonment in San Quentin State Prison for murder. Prison officials try to break his spirit by means of a torture device called "the jacket," a canvas jacket which can be tightly laced so as to compress the whole body, inducing angina. Standing discovers how to withstand the torture by entering a kind of trance state, in which he walks among the stars and experiences portions of past lives.

45.  Burning Daylight - This novel (published in 1910), was one of the best selling books of that year and it was Jack London’s best selling book in his lifetime. The novel takes place in the Yukon Territory in 1893. The main character, nicknamed Burning Daylight was the most successful entrepreneur of the Alaskan Gold Rush. The story of the main character was partially based upon the life of Oakland entrepreneur "Borax" Smith. 

01 - Chris Farrington: Able Seaman 
02 - Typhoon Off the Coast of Japan 
03 - The Lost Poacher 
04 - The Banks of the Sacramento 
05 - In Yeddo Bay 

47.  Up the Slide by Jack London (16th story from Short Story Collection # 54)

48.  War by Jack London (18th story from Short Story Collection # 54)

49.  That Spot by Jack London (8th story in Short Story # 55)

50.  The Valley of the Moon - The novel Valley of the Moon is a story of a working-class couple, Billy and Saxon Roberts, struggling laborers in Oakland at the Turn-of-the-Century, who left the city life behind and searched Central and Northern California for a suitable farmland to own. The book is notable for the scenes in which the proletarian hero enjoys fellowship with the artists' colony in Carmel, and he settles in the Valley of the Moon.

51. Revolution and Other Essays - A collection of 13 essays written between 1900 and 1908, published in 1910. The lead essay, "Revolution", outlines how and why London renounced capitalism as a failed social system and declared himself an active participant in the "socialist revolution", the last essay is an autobiographical piece, and the essays in between are on diverse subjects. A few of the “essays” are actually humorous short fiction stories; others are serious, sometimes angry rants against capitalistic greed and political corruption. All of the pieces are thought-provoking and excellently written, though only loosely intellectual, highly opinionated, and rife with contradiction, as was London himself.

52. Before Adam - "Before Adam” is a mixture of sound science and sci-fi speculation. It is based around Darwin's theory of evolution and the idea of racial memory. The main character lives in the current world but has dreams and nightmares that he relives the pre-stone age life of one of his proto-human ancestors. Those who are scientifically inclined may enjoy this novel more than fans of "standard" science fiction such as Edgar Rice Burroughs. 

53. The Road - Jack London credited his skill of story-telling to the days he spent as a hobo learning to fabricate tales to get meals from sympathetic strangers. In “The Road“, he relates the tales and memories of his days on the hobo road, including how the hobos would elude train crews and his travels with Kelly’s Army.

54. Tales of the Fish Patrol - The beautiful beaches of Points Pedro and Pablo, where are the shrimp-catchers villages, are made fearful by the stench from myriads of decaying fish, and against this wasteful destruction it has ever been the duty of the fish patrol to act. These stories are set in the waterways around San Francisco Bay and involve the fish patrol with a variety of characters of different ethnicity and cultural backgrounds. 

55. By The Turtles of Tasman - Turn of the century sibling rivalry between successful but uptight California businessman and his ne'er-do-well older brother, both widowers with equally-different 20-ish daughters. Written in 1911

56.  A Daughter of the Snows - In Jack London's first novel, he tells the story of Frona Welse, a strong and interesting heroine, "a Stanford graduate and physical Valkyrie," who heads to the Yukon gold fields after creating a stir in her hometown by being strong and forthright and by befriending the town's prostitute. In the course of her adventures, she finds herself at the distaff point of a love triangle. This novel contains very overt racial and gender stereotypes and as such reflects the attitudes growing in society at the time it was written. It is the practice at Librivox to record works as they stand, without judgment.

57.  When God Laughs, and Other Stories - This collection of Jack London's short stories touches on a variety of topics, from his love of boxing, to relationships between criminals, to the trials of life and travel on many frontiers, to an allegory about a king who desired a nose. London is considered a master of the short story, a form much more to his liking and personality than his novels. He was active and quick of mind and the short story suited him well.

58.  Dutch Courage and Other Stories - 10 Short Stories.  Jack London was quoted as saying, "I've never written a line that I'd be ashamed for my young daughters to read, and I never shall write such a line!" After his death in 1916, his wife Charmian assembled a collection of stories, most of which he had written for young readers, but at least one of which was for more mature readers, "Whose Business is to Live." Like most of London's work, his short stories could be read by young readers and then again when they were older with mature minds. These stories draw from London's own extensive experience in the world and demonstrate the dictum that "good writing is good writing" no matter for whom it was written.

59. The Cruise of the Dazzler - Young Joe Bronson, caught between poor grades and his father's threats of military school, runs away from home. He joins the crew of a sloop named the Dazzler, but quickly figures out his captain, Pete Le Maire (nicknamed "French Pete") frequently engages himself and those at his command in criminal activity. Will Joe be able to escape this unwanted and dangerous new life at sea? 
Published in 1902, Jack London sold this book (his first full-length novel) as a boy's adventure novel set in San Francisco, his hometown. In his autobiography, London recalls lifting several more elements in this novel from his adolescence, as in youth he bought a sloop called the Razzle Dazzle from an oyster pirate nicknamed "French Frank."

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     From Literal Systems:

    1. The Heathen

    From Miettecast.com:

     1.     An Adventure in the Upper Sea

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