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Edward Everett Hale Audio


Edward Everett Hale (1822 – 1909) was born  in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Nathan Hale (1784–1863), proprietor and editor of the Boston Daily Advertiser, and the brother of Lucretia Peabody Hale, Susan Hale, and Charles Hale. Edward Hale was the nephew of Edward Everett, the orator and statesman, while his father was the nephew of Nathan Hale, the war hero who was executed by the British for espionage during the Revolutionary War. He was also a descendant of Richard Everett and related to Helen Keller.
Hale was a child prodigy who exhibited extraordinary literary skills. He  enrolled at Harvard University immediately after. There, he settled in with the literary set, won two Bowdoin prizes and was elected the Class Poet. He graduated second in his class in 1839 and then studied at Harvard Divinity School. Decades later, he reflected on the new liberal theology there.  
In spite of the interest and extent of his other writings, it is more than possible that Hale may be known to posterity as a man of one story, and that story “The Man Without a Country.” This powerful and pathetic narrative was produced while the country was in the throes of the Civil War, and it embodied as no other literary production did the sentiment of loyalty to the Union. 

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The Man without a Country and Other Tales - Edward Everett Hale was an American author, historian and Unitarian clergyman. Hale first came to notice as a writer in 1859, when he contributed the short story "My Double and How He Undid Me" to the Atlantic Monthly. He soon published other stories in the same periodical. His best known work was "The Man Without a Country", published in the Atlantic in 1863 and intended to strengthen support in the Civil War for the Union cause in the North. Though the story is set in the early 19th century, it is an allegory about the upheaval of the American Civil War. As in some of his other non-romantic tales, he employed a minute realism which led his readers to suppose the narrative a record of fact. These two stories and such others as "The Skeleton in the Closet", gave him a prominent position among short-story writers of 19th century America. Each story in this collection has an introduction.
01 The Man Without A Country Part 1
02 The Man Without A Country Part 2
03 The Last Of The Florida 
04 A Piece Of Possible History 
05 The South American Editor 
06 The Old And The New, Face To Face 
07 A Dot And Line Alphabet 
08 The Last Voyage Of The Resolute Part 1
09 The Last Voyage Of The Resolute Part 2
10 My Double, And How He Undid Me Part 1
11 My Double, And How He Undid Me Part 2
12 The Children Of The Public, Introduction and Chapter 1
13 The Children Of The Public, Chapter 2: Where Is The Barrel?
14 The Children Of The Public, Chapter 3 & 4: The Crisis Part 1 
15 The Children Of The Public, Chapter 4: The Crisis Part 2 
16 The Children Of The Public, Chapter 5: Fausta's Story 
17 The Skeleton In The Closet 
18 Christmas Waits In Boston Part 1
19 Christmas Waits In Boston Part 2 
20 Christmas Waits In Boston Part 3

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