1034days since
Final is due!

Introduction

Please note:  This class has moved to the following address:  www.parseltongue101.com

   
So you want to learn Parseltongue. Maybe you've heard the few parselmouths in attendance this year conversing and want to know what's going on. Maybe you just have a pet snake you'd like to get to know better. Either way, you're interested.

    The bad news is, unless you were born a parselmouth, you will never be able to speak it fluently or even understand it entirely due to its inherent complexity. Parseltongue is not spoken or heard, it is felt. Without that innate connection, it is impossible to learn the language in its entirety.
 
    However, this class will help you recognize some of the more common words and basic sentence structure so you may be able to understand bits and pieces of conversations.

    If you'll look to the back of the classroom, you'll notice several terrariums with a variety of snakes that I encourage you to practice with. While they've agreed to cooperate with my lessons for the most part, they are snakes, and they will try to confuse you. Don't get disheartened. If you pay close attention you may learn additional words on your own from them by using context clues. This is part of the course. You must work together to learn from the class snakes. 

    By the end of the course you'll be able to pick out key words, and be able to put together a loose translation of a spoken sentence. You won't be able to pick out much detail, but you'll at least be able to figure out the general gist of it based on context clues. 

    This lack of full understanding may simply frustrate you further. But if you keep this thought in mind from the start, you will do just fine.  It is more a lesson in logic and how decipher words from context clues, known words, and derivatives than a lesson in language itself. 

    By taking this course you agree that any words discovered through homework assignments, discussions, or projects may be used to further the study of Parseltongue in future courses. See the Works Cited page for additional details on the use of your contributions.