Parker County Inmate Search

    parker county
  • Parker County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. In 2000, its population was 88,495; in 2005, its population was estimated to be 102,801. The county is part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex.
    inmate
  • One of several occupants of a house
  • one of several resident of a dwelling (especially someone confined to a prison or hospital)
  • convict: a person serving a sentence in a jail or prison
  • A person confined to an institution such as a prison or hospital
  • inpatient: a patient who is residing in the hospital where he is being treated
    search
  • Try to find something by looking or otherwise seeking carefully and thoroughly
  • try to locate or discover, or try to establish the existence of; "The police are searching for clues"; "They are searching for the missing man in the entire county"
  • an investigation seeking answers; "a thorough search of the ledgers revealed nothing"; "the outcome justified the search"
  • the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone
  • Examine (a place, vehicle, or person) thoroughly in order to find something or someone
  • Look for information or an item of interest in (a computer network or database) by keying words or other characters into a search engine
parker county inmate search
parker county inmate search - Orange County
Orange County Noir (Akashic Noir)
Orange County Noir (Akashic Noir)
Orange County, California, brings to mind the endless summer of sand and surf, McMansion housing tracts, a conservative stronghold, and tony shopping centers. It's a place where pilates classes are run like boot camps, real estate values are discussed at your weekly colonic, and ice cream parlors on Main Street, USA, exist side-by-side with pho shops and taquerias. Orange County Noir pulls back the veil to reveal what lurks behind the curtain.
Features brand-new stories by: Susan Straight, Robert S. Levinson, Rob Roberge, Nathan Walpow, Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, Dan Duling, Mary Castillo, Lawrence Maddox, Dick Lochte, Robert Ward, Gary Phillips, Gordon McAlpine, Martin J. Smith, and Patricia McFall.
Editor Gary Phillips is the author of many novels and short stories. He lives in Southern California.

Parker County Courthouse (Weatherford, Texas)
Parker County Courthouse (Weatherford, Texas)
The Parker County Courthouse was designed by Wesley Clark Dodson in 1885. It was this architect that designed the Denton County Courthouse (Denton), the Hood County Courthouse (Granbury), along with many other Texas Courthouses. This courthouse in particular is so outstanding in part due to its powerful position in the Weatherford town square. It is of course a National Register Property.
Parker County Courthouse
Parker County Courthouse
The Parker County Courthouse is located in the town of Weatherford, Texas. It was built of limestone in 1885 in the Second Empire style. Photo taken on April 21, 2010.
parker county inmate search
The Renegades: A Charlie Hood Novel
Deputy Sheriff Charlie Hood—the hero of L.A. Outlaws—left readers clamoring for more, and in The Renegades, T. Jefferson Parker more than delivers.

Some say that outlaws no longer exist, that the true spirit of the American West died with the legendary bandits of pulp novels and bedtime stories. Charlie Hood knows that nothing could be further from the truth. These days he patrols vast stretches of the new American West, not on horseback but in his cruiser. The outlaws may not carry six-shooters, but they’re strapped all the same.

Along the desolate and dusty roads of this new frontier, Hood prefers to ride alone, and he prefers to ride at night. At night, his headlights illuminate only the patch of pavement ahead of him: all the better to hide from the demons—and the dead outlaws—receding in his rearview mirror.

But he doesn’t always get what he wants— certainly not when he’s assigned a partner named Terry Laws, a county veteran who everyone calls “Mr. Wonderful.” And not when Laws is shot dead in the passenger seat and Hood is left to bear witness by someone who knew that Mr. Wonderful didn’t always live up to his nickname. As he sets out to find the gunman, Hood knows one thing for sure: The West is a state of mind, one where the bad guys sometimes wear white hats—and the good guys seek justice in whatever shade of gray they can find it.