Old Washoe Club
The Haunted Millionaires Club



Old Washoe Club (Ghost Adventures)

Zak, Nick and Aaron return to Virginia City, NV, the site of their very first investigation. The angry spirits in this old western mining town have been waiting for their return. Some amazing EVPs are captured during this episode of Ghost Adventures at the Old Washoe Club.

Virginia City, Nevada, or Old Virginny Town as it was called by locals, was built around the infamous Comstock Lode, which, in 1859, was the first major discovery of silver in the US, and which lured fortune-seeking prospectors from all over the world.

Here, immense fortunes were made by a lucky few while countless others toiled in the mines, often meeting their death in pursuit of the same.

The Comstock Lode was the first major U.S. discovery of silver ore, located under what is now Virginia City, Nevada, on the eastern slope of Mount Davidson, a peak in the Virginia Range. After the discovery was made public in 1859, prospectors rushed to the area and scrambled to stake their claims.

Mining camps soon thrived in the vicinity, which became bustling centers of fabulous wealth. The excavations were carried to depths of more than 3,200 feet (1,000 m).

It is notable not just for the immense fortunes it generated and the large role those fortunes had in the growth of Nevada and San Francisco, but also for the advances in mining technology that it spurred. The mines declined after 1874.

Death came in many forms on the Comstock, not only in the mines, but on the rowdy streets, in the saloons, gambling halls and brothels.

Shootouts, bar-room brawls and straight up murder were everyday common occurrences. Disease was rife and epidemics such as the typhoid epidemic of 1874, were commonplace.
 
Shootouts, bar-room brawls and straight up murder were everyday common occurrences at the Old Washoe Club. Disease was rife and epidemics such as the typhoid epidemic of 1874, were commonplace.


 

The Old Washoe Club was built in 1862, during the heart of the silver rush. Originally built as an office building, it later housed a saloon on the first floor, as it still does to this day.

It was one of the few Civil War era buildings to survive the great fire of 1875, and this fact led to its history being forever altered when a newly established Millionaires Club relocated after the fire from its original home across the street to the Washoe Clubs second floor.The Millionaires Club was where the newly rich and elite of the Comstock could rub elbows, drink in excess, gamble and cavort with soiled doves, away from the riff-raff of the wild and wooly streets below.

Many of the most powerful and notable men of the era were known to grace the spiral staircase that led to the upper floors, including Ulysses S. Grant and honorary Millionaires Club member, Mark Twain.