Wolf's Lair
Hitler's Eastern Front Command Post



Wolf's Lair (Ghost Hunters International) - Wolf's Lair is the standard English name for Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler's first World War II Eastern Front military headquarters, one of several Führerhauptquartier (Führer Headquarters) or FHQs located in various parts of Europe.

The team makes their debut in Poland at the Wolf's Lair, Hitler's Eastern Front command post, where he spent roughly 800 days and where the attempt on his life, Operation Valkyrie, failed. Judwiga, the staff historian, tours them around the facility, where eerie noises, voices speaking German, and creepy feelings, as of being watched, abound.

In the lobby, Robb and Brandy offer the spirits a choice of several devices to use for communication, and are intrigued when something seems to be telling them that it is a female member of the Nazi party.

In the guest bunker, Barry attempts to communicate by speaking German, while Ashley and Susan head to Hitler's decimated bunker - it happens to be Hitler's birthday, and they use this fact to their advantage. They feel a presence with them, and, following their feeling into the woods, find a small votive burning in the woods - but it was clearly lit hours ago.


The decision to build the Wolf's Lair was made in the autumn of 1940.

Built in the middle of a protecting forest, and located far from major roads, the complex occupied more than 6.5 km2 (2.5 sq miles) and consisted of three separate security zones, the most important of which was Sperrkreis 1 (Security Zone 1), in which was located the Führer Bunker and concrete shelters of members of the inner circle.


Robb, with Brandy in the officer's quarters, catches an out-of-place shadow. They try to recreate the phenomenon, and hope that their technical equipment backs up their experiences.

Paul and Barry try the Singapore Theory, which states that recreating a spirit's accustomed environment increases likelihood of contact, by playing Beethoven in Hitler's bunker.

Robb theorizes on the distance that a spirit, such as Hitler's could travel - say, from Berlin to Poland - as he and Brandy explore the guest bunker. They immediately hear a male voice, and Robb follows it into the treacherous, darkened rubble of the wasted bunker.

Analysis proves fruitful - Paul finds a juicy catch: After the question, in German, "Do you speak English?" they hear a "Yes, sir." A photo that Susan suspects might be of a glowing orb turns out to be just a dust particle.

Barry hears a female voice ask in English, "Where is Hitler?" And the team examines a photo that is believed to show Hitler's face, but determine that it's just a part of the wall. But most exciting, Brandy finds technical support on her full-spectrum footage that backs up her and Robb's experience of the mysterious shadow in the officer's quarters.

In the reveal with Judwiga, she explains that the female voice asking for Hitler could've been an American model-turned-spy, known to have been at the Wolf's Lair, and they explain how the footage from the full-spectrum camera in the officer's quarters shows something moving past a window and casting a shadow, when no shadow should've been there. Judwiga is grateful to have more information to help explain this mysterious and historically rich site to visitors and enthusiasts.


Hitler Decorates General Model at the Wolf's Lair headquarters (March 1942)


Wolf's Lair is the standard English name for Wolfsschanze, Adolf
Hitler's first World War II Eastern Front military headquarters, one of several Führerhauptquartier (Führer Headquarters) or FHQs located in various parts of Europe.

The complex, which was built for Operation Barbarossa, the 1941 German invasion of the Soviet Union, was located in the Masurian woods, about 8 kilometres (5.0 miles) from the small East Prussian town of Rastenburg, now Kętrzyn in Poland.

The original bunker system was constructed by Organisation Todt, but the later planned enlargement was never finished; the expansion work was stopped only a few days before the Russian advance to Angerburg (now Węgorzewo), only 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) away.

Hitler first arrived at the Wolf's Lair late on the night of June 23rd, 1941, and departed for the last time on November 20th, 1944. Overall, he spent over 800 days there during that 3 1⁄2-year period.

The complex was blown up and abandoned on January 25th, 1945, but many of the bunkers were so thick that their damaged walls and ceilings remain. The remains are located in Poland at the hamlet of Gierłoż (German: Forst Görlitz) near Kętrzyn.