Talking to a Ghost on Board the Star of India
Spirits Still Roaming the Decks of the Star of India



Talking to a Ghost on Board the Star of India
Spirits Still Roaming the Decks of the Star of India

SCP (South Coast Paranormal) was able to establish communication with a spirit on board the Star of India via a Geophone. A Geophone is a device we use that measures vibrations. It displays the vibrations on a scale system using a series of lights. The stronger the vibration, the more lights light up.


The geophone was on a stool in the Captains Saloon on board the ship. You can clearly see that when David bangs on the table the vibrations do not show on the geophone...however, when the spirit knocks on the stool the geophone picks them right up. This was a response immediately after the question. One of the more impressive bits of documented evidence that the SCP captured on board The Star of India.



Star of India was built in 1863 as Euterpe, a full-rigged iron windjammer ship in Ramsey, Isle of Man.

After a full career sailing from Great Britain to India then to New Zealand, she became a salmon hauler on the Alaska then to California route.

After retirement in 1926, she was restored between 1962 and 1963 and is now a seaworthy museum ship ported at the San Diego Maritime Museum in San Diego, United States.

She is the 2nd oldest ship that still sails regularly and the oldest iron hulled merchant ship still floating. The ship is both a California and United States National Historic Landmark.

Named for Euterpe, the muse of music, she was a full-rigged ship (a ship that has 3 masts and squaresails on all 3 masts) built of iron in 1863 by Gibson, McDonald & Arnold, of Ramsey, Isle of Man, for the Indian jute trade of Wakefield Nash & Company of Liverpool.

She was launched on November 14th, 1863, and assigned British Registration No.47617 and signal VPJK. Euterpe's career had a rough beginning.

She sailed for Calcutta from Liverpool on January 9th, 1864, under the command of Captain William John Storry. A collision with an unlighted, hit-and-run Spanish brig off the coast of Wales carried away the jib-boom and damaged other rigging.

The crew became mutinous, refusing to continue, and she returned to Anglesey to repair; 17 of the crew were confined to the Beaumaris Jail at hard labor.

Then, in 1865, Euterpe was forced to cut away her masts in a gale in the Bay of Bengal off Madras and limped to Trincomalee and Calcutta for repair. Captain Storry died during the return voyage to England and was buried at sea.

After her near-disastrous first two voyages Euterpe was sold, first in 1871 to David Brown of London for whom she made four more relatively uneventful voyages to India, then again (displaced by steamers after the opening of the Suez Canal) in 1871 to Shaw, Savill & Company of London.

In late 1871 she began twenty-five years of carrying passengers and freight in the New Zealand emigrant trade, each voyage going eastward around the world before returning to England. The fastest of her 21 passages to New Zealand took 100 days, the longest 143 days.

She also made ports of call in Australia, California, and Chile. A baby was born on one of those trips en route to New Zealand, and was given the middle name Euterpe.

In 1897, after 21 round-the-world trips, Euterpe was sold, first to Hawaiian owners, then in 1899 to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, California and from 1898 to 1901 made four voyages between the Pacific Northwest, Australia and Hawaii carrying primarily lumber, coal and sugar. She was registered in the United States on October 30th, 1900.



Star of India & the Berkeley - Ghost Hunters


The Star of India was built back in 1863, originally christened as the Euterpe. On her first voyage to India, the iron windjammer suffered a collision and her crew mutinied. On this voyage, the ship got caught in a cyclone and its captain died at sea.

This wasn't the only tragedy on the Euterpe, another of the ship's captains committed suicide in 1875 by slashing his own throat. In 1884, one seaman touching up paint drowned in the Thames. And then, a young stowaway turned crewman, named John Campbell, fell over 100 feet from the mast lines to the deck.

The Euterpe was sold to American owners in 1898 and commenced a regular route between Oakland and Alaska. In 1906, her new owners rechristened the ship the Star of India.

The ship fell into disrepair over the years until a restoration effort began in the 1950's. Fully restored by 1976, the Star sails at least once a year with a fully trained volunteer crew, making her the oldest active ship in the world.

While the history of the ship makes it a landmark for San Diego, the paranormal experiences on the ship make it a landmark for investigators. Supernatural encounters include feeling the presences of former crewman; or smelling freshly baked bread in the ship's galley, which is no longer functional.

Teacups and other objects in the captain's cabin move without explanation. And in the bowels of the ship, people report feelings of intense dread and sadness so overwhelming that they have to leave.


Supernatural encounters on-board the Star of India include feeling the presences of former crewman; or smelling freshly baked bread in the ship's galley, which is no longer functional.

Teacups and other objects in the captain's cabin move without explanation. And in the bowels of the ship, people report feelings of intense dread and sadness so overwhelming that they have to leave.



Across the port from the Star of India rests the Berkeley, the 1898 steam ferryboat that is a National Historic Landmark. During the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the Berkeley carried thousands of survivors to safety.

Her captain and crew, not knowing the fate of their own families, worked night and day to help victims escape the burning shores of San Francisco. Their unwavering and unselfish efforts saved countless lives. In the early part of the 20th century, mining was still a vital component of the northern California landscape. You could buy mining supplies at any store, and pure nitroglycerin was available at any chemist's shop.

Which is why it wasn't a total surprise when one day, a massive explosion blew out the entire side of Berkeley. It is believed that a man in the bathroom either deliberately killed himself, or accidentally set off a vial of nitroglycerin.

On the passenger deck, incredibly heavy footsteps are heard traveling down the deck in 15-foot strides. And the sounds of a loud party are heard on an empty deck formely used for parties. An ominous presence has been felt in the engine and boiler rooms.

Most peculiar, is a full-bodied apparition of a man wearing a trench coat standing in a doorway. He has been nicknamed the Fedora Man, and it is believed that he appears in several photographs taken on the party deck.