Rupert Sheldrake: Telephone Telepathy
Part of us Extends Beyond our Bodies



Rupert Sheldrake: Telephone Telepathy
Part of us Extends Beyond our Bodies

The renowned biologist Rupert Sheldrake presents his recent findings, powerfully suggesting that part of us extends beyond our bodies to make direct connection with the world around us. The presentation includes a video (filmed for television) showing the Nolan sisters.


Rupert Sheldrake (born June 28th 1942) is an English biochemist and plant physiologist. He is known for having proposed a non-standard account of morphogenesis and for his research into parapsychology.

His books and papers stem from his theory of morphic resonance, and cover topics such as animal and plant development and behaviour, memory, telepathy, perception and cognition in general.


His publications include A New Science of Life (1981), Seven Experiments That Could Change the World (1995), Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home (1999), and The Sense of Being Stared At (2003). Sheldrake's ideas have often met with a hostile reception from some scientists, including accusations that he is engaged in pseudoscience.

John Maddox, editor of Nature wrote: "Sheldrake's argument is an exercise in pseudo-science. — Many readers will be left with the impression that Sheldrake has succeeded in finding a place for magic within scientific discussion — and this, indeed, may have been a part of the objective of writing such a book.".

Morphic resonance predicts that memories of one generation are automatically passed on to the next generation or to other conspecifics. A neuroscientist and memory expert, Steven Rose, has been critical of this view.

A major reason for the criticism is that Rose does not feel there to be any anomalous phenomena which require the theory of morphic resonance as an explanation. Rose suggested an experiment to resolve the matter. In Rose's opinion the resulting study, done in collaboration with Sheldrake, disproved morphic resonance, but Sheldrake has challenged this.