Uri Geller Fails on The Tonight Show
Claims they are Paranormal Powers given to him by Extraterrestrials



Uri Geller Fails on The Tonight Show
Claims they are Paranormal Powers given to him by Extraterrestrials

 
Geller used to call his abilities "psychic," but now prefers to refer to himself as a "mystifier" and entertainer. Geller first started to perform in theatres, public halls, auditoriums, military bases and universities in Israel.

By the 1970s, Geller had become known in the United States and Europe. He also received attention from the scientific community, whose members were interested in examining his reported psychic abilities.

At the peak of his career in the 1970s, he worked full-time, performing for television audiences worldwide.


 
In 1973, Carson had a legendary run-in with popular psychic Uri Geller when he invited Geller to appear on his show.

Carson, an experienced stage magician, wanted a neutral demonstration of Geller's alleged abilities, so, at the advice of his friend and fellow magician James Randi, he gave Geller several spoons out of his desk drawer and asked him to bend them with his psychic powers.

Geller proved unable, and his appearance on The Tonight Show has since been regarded as the beginning of Geller's fall from glory.


Geller gained notice for demonstrating on television what he claimed to be psychokinesis, dowsing, and telepathy. His performance included bending spoons, describing hidden drawings, and making watches stop or run faster.

Geller said he performs these feats through will power and the strength of his mind. Magicians have said that his performances can be duplicated using stage magic tricks.


Uri Geller (born December 20th, 1946) is an Israeli paranormalist living in England; he is well known for his trademark television performances of spoon bending and other supposed physical effects.

Throughout the years, Geller has claimed that he achieves these effects through psychokinesis and telepathy, though critics say they are easily replicated magic tricks.

The debate over the veracity of Geller's performance has gone on since he first rose to international attention in the 1970s. Geller's career as an entertainer has spanned almost four decades, with television shows and appearances in many countries.

Geller used to call his abilities "psychic," but now prefers to refer to himself as a "mystifier" and entertainer.

Geller has claimed his feats are the result of paranormal  powers given to him by extraterrestrials, but critics such as James Randi argue and have demonstrated that Geller's tricks can be replicated with stage magic and are simply "parlour tricks".


Geller was unable to bend any tableware during a 1973 appearance on The Tonight Show in which the spoons he was to bend had been pre-selected by Johnny Carson.

Earlier in his career, Carson had been an amateur stage magician, and he consulted James Randi for advice on how to thwart potential trickery.

In 1993 Randi explained in "Secrets of the Psychics" for the NOVA television series: "I was asked to prevent any trickery. I told them to provide their own props and not to let Geller or his people anywhere near them."

A clip of this incident was televised on the NBC show Phenomenon. This two-minute clip has been widely circulated on the Internet since James Randi acquired permission to use it from NBC, and Carson paid for the videotape transfer. In his television special Secrets of the Psychics, Geller is shown failing at psychic "hand dowsing" (i.e. locating sealed vessels containing water without touching them), not metal bending.