Ninel Kulagina and Psychokinesis
Proving that there is such a Power?



Ninel Kulagina and Psychokinesis
Proving that there is such a Power?

From the files of psychic investigator, Russian housewife performs P.K. (Psychokinesis) in a demonstration by Soviet scientists.
Nina Kulagina (1926 - 1990) was a Russian woman who claimed to have psychic powers especially with Psychokinesis.

Academic research was conducted of her powers within the USSR for the last 20 years of her life.

There has been a debate over if she was using trickery to fool people into believing she had powers of Psychokinesis.

Many people believe that she is one of the few people that proved that there is such a power as Psychokinesis.


Kulagina claimed that she first recognized her ability, which she believed she had inherited from her mother, when she realized that items spontaneously moved around her when she was angry.

Kulagina said that in order to manifest the effect, she required a period of meditation to clear her mind of all thoughts. When she had obtained the focus required, she reported a sharp pain in her spine and the blurring of her eyesight.

Reportedly, storms interfered with her ability to perform psychokinetic acts. One of Kulagina most celebrated experiments took place in a Leningrad laboratory on March 10th, 1970.

Having initially studied the ability to move inanimate objects, scientists were curious to see if Nina's abilities extended to cells, tissues, and organs.

Sergeyev was one of many scientists present when Nina attempted to use her energy to stop the beating of a frog's heart floating in solution. He said that she focused intently on the heart and apparently made it beat faster, then slower, and using extreme intent of thought, stopped it.

 
Kulagina claimed that she first recognized her ability, which she believed she had inherited from her mother, when she realized that items spontaneously moved around her when she was angry.

Kulagina said that in order to manifest the effect, she required a period of meditation to clear her mind of all thoughts.

When she had obtained the focus required, she reported a sharp pain in her spine and the blurring of her eyesight.



Ninel Kulagina Skeptics


From the files of Psychic Investigator.

In the 1970s, not everyone was convinced that the Soviet psychics were a threat to the U.S.

Many skeptical individuals and organizations, such as the James Randi Educational Foundation and the Italian Committee for the Investigation of Claims on the Paranormal (CICAP) express strong skepticism regarding the truth of these claims.

It is noted that the long preparation times and uncontrolled environments (such as hotel rooms) in which the experiments took place left much potential for trickery.


Skeptics have argued that many of Kulagina's feats could easily be performed by one practiced in sleight of hand, through means such as cleverly concealed or disguised threads, small pieces of magnetic metal, or mirrors.

They further point to the fact that no sleight of hand experts appear to have ever been present during experiments, and that the Cold War-era Soviet Union had an obvious motive for falsifying or exaggerating results in the potential propaganda value in appearing to win a "Psi Race" analogous to the concurrent Space Race or arms race.