SETI Space Sounds
Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence



SETI Space Sounds
Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

Some interesting sounds that have come from the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) program. The United States Government use to contribute to the SETI program but now it is mostly funded through private sources. The goal of the SETI program: "Listening for ET". You can help contribute to the SETI program by using a free program on your computer called: SETI@Home.


Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is the collective name for a number of activities people undertake to search for extraterrestrial life.

SETI projects use scientific methods to search for electromagnetic transmissions from civilizations on distant planets.


The United States government contributed to earlier SETI projects, but recent work has been primarily funded by private sources.

There are great challenges in searching across the sky for a first transmission that could be characterized as intelligent, since its direction, spectrum and method of communication are all unknown beforehand.

SETI projects necessarily make assumptions to narrow the search, and thus no exhaustive search has been conducted so far.

Many radio frequencies penetrate our atmosphere quite well, and this led to radio telescopes that investigate the cosmos using large radio antennas.

Furthermore, the earth emits considerable radio radiation as a byproduct of communications such as TV and radio, and these radiations would be easy to recognize as artificial due to their repetitive nature and narrow bandwidths.

If this is typical, one way of discovering an extraterrestrial civilization might be to detect non-natural radio emissions from a location outside our solar system.

Cosmos - Who Speaks for Earth?
 
 
Many radio frequencies penetrate our atmosphere quite well, and this led to radio telescopes that investigate the cosmos using large radio antennas.

Furthermore, the Earth emits considerable electromagnetic radiation as a byproduct of communications such as television and radio.

These signals would be easy to recognize as artificial due to their repetitive nature and narrow bandwidths.

If this is typical, one way of discovering an extraterrestrial civilization might be to detect non-natural radio emissions from a location outside our Solar System.


 

Carl Edward Sagan was an American astronomer, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science popularizer and science communicator in the space and natural sciences.

During his lifetime, he published more than 600 scientific papers and popular articles and was author, co-author, or editor of more than 20 books. In his works, he advocated skeptical inquiry and the scientific method.

He pioneered exobiology and promoted the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

Sagan became world-famous for his popular science books and for the award-winning 1980 television series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage, which he narrated and co-wrote.


A book to accompany the program was also published. Sagan also wrote the novel Contact, the basis for the 1997 film of the same name.

Sagan's ability to convey his ideas allowed many people to better understand the cosmos —simultaneously emphasizing the value and worthiness of the human race, and the relative insignificance of the Earth in comparison to the universe.

He delivered the 1977 series of Royal Institution Christmas Lectures in London. He hosted and, with Ann Druyan, co-wrote and co-produced the highly popular thirteen-part PBS television series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage modeled on Jacob Bronowski's The Ascent of Man.

Sagan was a proponent of the search for extraterrestrial life. He urged the scientific community to listen with radio telescopes for signals from intelligent extraterrestrial life-forms. So persuasive was he that by 1982 he was able to get a petition advocating SETI published in the journal Science and signed by 70 scientists including seven Nobel Prize winners.

This was a tremendous turnaround in the respectability of this controversial field. Sagan also helped Dr. Frank Drake write the Arecibo message, a radio message beamed into space from the Arecibo radio telescope on November 16, 1974, aimed at informing extraterrestrials about Earth.




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