Budd Hopkins and UFO Research
Alien Encounters and Missing Time



Budd Hopkins and UFO Research
Alien Encounters and Missing Time

Does alien abduction really happen, or is it the product of vivid imaginations? Budd Hopkins (born on June 15th, 1931 in Wheeling, West Virginia) is a central figure in abduction phenomenon and related UFO research. CNN's Miles O'Brien reports.


In 1964, Hopkins and two others saw a UFO in daylight for several minutes. Fascinated, he joined UFO research group NICAP and began reading many UFO books and articles.

In 1975, Hopkins and Ted Bloecher studied a multiple-witness UFO report, the North Hudson Park UFO sightings which occurred in New Jersey.

In 1976, the Village Voice printed Hopkins' account of the investigation. Hopkins began receiving regular letters from other UFO witnesses, including a few cases of what would later be called "missing time": inexplicable gaps in one's memory, associated with UFO encounters.


With Bloecher and psychologist Aphrodite Clamar, Hopkins began investigating the missing time experiences, and eventually came to conclude that the missing time cases were due to alien abduction.

By the late 1980s, Hopkins was one of the most prominent people in ufology, earning a level of mainstream attention that was nearly unprecedented for the field.

He established the non-profit Intruders Foundation 1989 to publicize his research.

Hopkins has written several popular books about abductees, notably Missing Time, and is the founder of the Intruders Foundation, a non-profit organization created to document and research alien abductions, and to provide support to abductees.

For roughly the first seven years of his investigation of the abduction phenomenon, Hopkins himself conducted no hypnosis sessions.

Rather, he secured the aid of licensed professionals. He notes that three of these therapists (Drs. Robert Naiman, Aphrodite Clamar and Girard Franklin) were quite skeptical of the reality of abduction claims, yet all uncovered detailed abduction scenarios from their patients.

 
Budd Hopkins (born on June 15th, 1931 in Wheeling, West Virginia) is a central figure in abduction phenomenon and related UFO research.

In 1964, Hopkins and two others saw a UFO in daylight for several minutes. Fascinated, he joined the now-defunct UFO research group NICAP and began reading many UFO books and articles.

 


Budd Hopkins Interview

A hard-hitting interview with Budd Hopkins, UFO Abduction Researcher & Author.

Controversy has been a persistent feature of Hopkins' career in alien abduction and UFO studies.

While few seem to doubt Hopkin's motives or sincerity, critics charge that Hopkins is out of his element when he uses hypnosis, thereby aiding his subjects in confabulation: the blending of fact and fantasy.


However, Hopkins insists such criticism is specious. He writes, "I have often frequently invited interested therapists, journalists and academics to observe hypnosis sessions."

"Theoretical psychologist Nicholas Humphrey, who has held teaching positions at both Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and psychiatrist Donald. F. Klein, director of research at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and professor of psychiatry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, are but two of those who have observed my work firsthand. None of these visitors ... have reported anything that suggested I was attempting to lead the subjects."


The 1992 film Intruders was based on Hopkins' research, and portrayed abduction scenes. Additionally, Hopkin's 1996 book, Witnessed, portrays a classic abduction case that occurred in late 1989 near the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City.

This case is unique in that it is one of the first publicized episodes that involved multiple abductees (who did not previously know each other) that come to know each other in the "real" world through a variety of circumstances connected to their abductions. Additionally, this case involved inter-generational abductions within the same family.


Missing Time - Unsolved Mysteries


Missing time is a proposed phenomenon reported by some people in connection with close encounters with UFOs and abduction phenomena.


The term missing time refers to a gap in conscious memory relating to a specific period in time.

The gap can last from several minutes to several days in length. The memory of what happened during the missing time reported is often recovered through hypnosis or during dreams.

One notable case is that of the Betty and Barney Hill abduction. The Hills claim to have experienced a period of missing time after witnessing a UFO.

Missing time is controversial in that apart from disbelief in UFO phenomenon, it is closely tied to other controversial issues such as recovered memories and hypnosis.

  1. The subject is mistaken about the time, such as a departure time, so that an event seemed to take longer than it actually did.

  2. The memory of the event, real or imagined, is traumatic so that the mind represses it. The concept and reality of repressed memories is debated among psychoanalysts and scientists, however, and many do not support the concept at all.

  3. The event itself did not happen and the subject instead imagined as part of a hallucination caused by drugs or a seizure (Absence seizure), or implanted during hypnosis.

  4. Highway hypnosis, or losing track of time while driving and having one's mind distracted.

  5. The event is real, and the time was lost due to the Twin Paradox predicted by Einstein's Special theory of relativity: If the abductee was taken into the UFO which then flew into space at very high speeds, forming a loop trajectory eventually returning to Earth and letting the abductee free, time would be subject to relativistic effects.

    According to the special theory of relativity, while many hours or days have elapsed on Earth, the elapsed time experienced by the occupants of the craft will be much shorter if the UFO traveled at a sufficiently high velocity. Although the Twin Paradox itself is widely accepted as correct and true in physics, this explanation does not prove that UFO abductions themselves are real.

    It merely provides a plausible explanation for the missing time, should the abduction (or voluntary travel by a future man-made spacecraft) indeed occur. Furthermore, should an abduction have occurred, this would not explain the inability to remember the events which took place on board the hypothetical spacecraft, events which would, to the traveler, seem to pass in real time -- simply in less time than was "missing".

    Paranormal events such as UFO abductions are highly contested. See, for example, the evidence and skepticism for the five-day missing time in the well-known Travis Walton case.