I Know What I Saw
Some of the Most Credible UFO Witnesses from Around the World

I Know What I Saw
Some of the Most Credible UFO Witnesses from Around the World

There have been allegations of suppression of UFO related evidence for many decades. There are claims that physical evidence might have been removed and/or destroyed/suppressed by some governments.

"The day will arrive when the governments of earth will finally admit we are not alone, that humans have come face-to-face with other lifeforms from the cosmos. Anyone still on the fence about the existence of UFOs must contend with the testimonies of these respected and honored men."

- Clark McClelland (NASA)

The documentary "I Know What I Saw" change the way we see the universe. Director, James Fox assembled some of the most credible UFO witnesses from around the world to testify at The National Press Club in Washington D.C.

They were: Air Force Generals, US astronauts, military pilots, commercial pilots, government and FAA officials from seven countries. Governor Fife Symington from Arizona stated said, it: "will challenge your reality".

Their accounts reveal a secret U.S. operation with the aim to confiscate and hoard substantiating evidence from close encounters to the extent that even Presidents have failed to get straight answers.

The documentary exposes reasons behind government secrecy from those involved at the highest level.

The modern UFO mystery has three traceable roots: the late 19th century "mystery airships" reported in the newspapers of western United States, "foo fighters" reported by Allied airmen during World War II, and the Kenneth Arnold "flying saucer" sighting near Mt. Rainier, Washington on June 24, 1947.

UFO reports between "The Great Airship Wave" and the Arnold sighting were limited in number compared to the post-war period: notable cases include reports of "ghost fliers" in Europe and North America during the 1930s and the numerous reports of "ghost rockets" in Scandinavia (mostly Sweden) from May to December 1946.

Media hype in the late 1940s and early 1950s following the Arnold sighting brought the concept of flying saucers to the public audience.

As the public's preoccupation in UFOs grew, along with the number of reported sightings, the United States military began to take notice of the phenomenon.

The UFO explosion of the early post-war era coincides with the escalation of the Cold War and the Korean War.

The U.S. military feared that secret aircraft of the Soviet Union, possibly developed from captured German technology, were behind the sightings.

If correct, the craft causing the sightings were thus of importance to national security and of need of systematic investigation. By 1952, however, the official US government interest in UFOs began to fade as the USAF projects Sign and Grudge concluded, along with the CIA's Robertson Panel that UFO reports indicated no direct threat to national security.

The government's official research into UFOs ended with the publication of the Condon Committee report in 1969, which concluded that the study of UFOs in the past 21 years had achieved little, if anything, and that further extensive study of UFO sightings was unwarranted.

It also recommended the termination of the USAF special unit Project Blue Book. As the U.S. government ceased officially studying UFO sightings, the same became true for most governments of the world.

A notable exception is France, which still maintains the GEIPAN, formerly known as GEPAN (1977–1988) and SEPRA (1988–2004), a unit under the French Space Agency CNES. During the Cold War, British, Canadian, Danish, Italian, and Swedish governments have each collected reports of UFO sightings.

Britain's Ministry of Defence ceased accepting any new reports as of 2010.

The Majestic 12

Majestic 12 is the alleged code name of a secret committee of scientists, military leaders, and government officials, supposedly formed in 1947 by an executive order of U.S. President Harry S. Truman.

The alleged purpose of the committee was to investigate UFO activity in the aftermath of the Roswell incident—the supposed crash of the alien spaceship near Roswell, New Mexico, in July 1947.

The Majestic 12 is an important part of the UFO conspiracy theory of an ongoing government cover up of UFO information.

The FBI has declared that the documents associated with the Majestic 12 committee are "completely bogus".

Research has shown that there were many social and professional connections among many of the alleged members of MJ-12. For example, Bush, Hunsaker, Bronk, and Berkner all sat on the oversight committee of the Research and Development Board (RDB), which Bush had established and initially chaired.

Other notables on the RDB oversight committee were Karl Compton, Robert Oppenheimer, and Dr. H. P. Robertson, who headed up the debunking Robertson Panel, of which Berkner was a member. 1950 Canadian documents indicated that Bush headed up a small, highly secret UFO study group within the RDB.

Various alleged MJ-12 members or participants would also naturally be part of the Presidential office's National Security Council, created in 1947. This would include various NSC permanent members: Executive Secretary (Souers, Cutler), the Secretary of Defense (Forrestal), the Secretary of the Army (Gray), National Security Advisor (Gray), and the Air Force Chief of Staff (Vandenberg, Twining).

Other nonpermanent members who would attend NSC meetings as advisors and implement policy would be the CIA director (Hillenkoetter, Smith), the head of the Research and Development Board (Bush, Compton), the President's Special Assistant for National Security Affairs (Cutler, Gray), and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs (Twining).

Therefore the supposed members and participating personnel of MJ-12 would have served on many other high government agencies and could conceivably have influenced government policy at many levels. The purported members were trusted, high-ranking officials who were often involved in important government projects—they possessed diverse skills and high security clearances.

However, they were not so recognizable that they would be missed if they were to be called upon in a secret emergency. If such a group existed, these individuals would make plausible members.