Mir UFO Phenomena
Unknown Objects Around the Mir Space Station



Mir UFO Phenomena
Unknown Objects Around the Mir Space Station


An investigation into Russian Mir space station phenomena. An analysis carried out on my favorite footage of Mir UFO encounters.

You will notice how these objects appear out of no where and how they maneuver in weird, linear and non-linear fashions.


Majority of the footage has been fast forwarded and some footage has been slowed down to emphasize on these objects. This way a common peculiar UFO patterns have been discovered.


Last bit of footage represent an astonishing revelation of a very rare glimpse of a triangular UFO as it moves across an astronauts window.


Mir (Peace or World) was a Soviet and later Russian space station.

It was the world's first consistently inhabited long-term research station in space, and the first of the third generation type of space station, constructed from 1986 to 1996 with a modular design.


The station was in operation for fifteen years until March 23rd, 2001, when it was deliberately de-orbited, breaking apart during atmospheric re-entry over the South Pacific Ocean.


The station currently holds the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at eight days short of ten years, and was occupied for a total of twelve and a half years of its fifteen-year lifespan.

Mir had the capacity to support a resident crew of three but could also support larger crews for short-term visits, the largest crew simultaneously aboard the station being six.

Through a number of international collaborations, including Intercosmos, Euromir and the Shuttle-Mir Program, the station was made accessible to astronauts from North America, several western European nations, Japan as well as cosmonauts from various eastern nations. 
 
Unknown objects filmed hovering around the Mir space station. Some claim it is just space debris, while others believe they are genuine UFOs.

 


NASA STS-74 Observes Mir with UFOs

As the light changes we see different UFOs pass MIR. One astronaut says,"there's a lot of people swimming around up here". NASA's reply "I'll bet, and we know"!

(From Martyn Stubbs NASA UFO Archives.)


Mir also marked the beginning of space tourism when Japanese journalist Toyohiro Akiyama made a paid visit in 1990.

In the later years of the programme, particularly during the Shuttle-Mir programme, Mir suffered from various systems failures as the station aged.

The station was originally designed to fly for five years but eventually flew for three times that length of time, and in the 1990s was showing its age—constant computer crashes, loss of power, uncontrolled tumbles through space and leaking pipes were an ever-present concern for crews.

Near the end of its life, there were plans for private interests to purchase Mir, possibly for use as the first orbital television/movie studio. The privately-funded Soyuz TM-30 mission by MirCorp, launched on April 4th, 2000, carried two crew members, Sergei Zalyotin and Alexandr Kaleri, to the station for two months to do repair work with the hope of proving that the station could be made safe.

But this was to be the last manned mission to Mir. While Russia was optimistic about Mir's future, its commitments to the International Space Station project left no funding to support the aging Mir.


Mir's Deorbit


The journey of the 15-year-old Russian space station ended on March 23rd, 2001, as Mir re-entered the Earth's atmosphere near Nadi, Fiji, and fell into the South Pacific.

Near the end of its life, there were plans for private interests to purchase Mir, possibly for use as the first orbital television/movie studio.

The privately-funded Soyuz TM-30 mission by MirCorp, launched on April 4th, 2000, carried two crew members, Sergei Zalyotin and Alexandr Kaleri, to the station for two months to do repair work with the hope of proving that the station could be made safe.

But this was to be the last manned mission to Mir.

While Russia was optimistic about Mir's future, its commitments to the International Space Station project left no funding to support the aging station.

Its downfall - planned and controlled - began around 8 a.m. Moscow time. Engines of a cargo ship docked to Mir were fired causing the station's orbit to brake, starting the Mir's descent.



Mir's Deorbit

Mir breaks up in Earth's atmosphere over the South Pacific on March 23rd, 2001.

Major destruction of the station began around 05:52 UTC and the unburned fragments fell into the South Pacific Ocean around 06:00 UTC.


Mir's deorbit was done in three stages. The first stage was waiting for atmospheric drag to decay Mir’s orbit an average of 220 kilometers (137 miles).

This began with the docking of Progress M1-5, a modified version of the Progress M carrying 2.5 times more fuel in place of supplies. The second stage was the transfer of the station into a 165 × 220 km (103 × 137 mi) orbit. This was achieved with two burns of the Progress M1-5's control engines at 00:32 UTC and 02:01 UTC on March 23rd, 2001.

After a two-orbit pause, the third and final stage of Mir's deorbit began with the burn of Progress M1-5's control engines and main engine at 05:08 UTC, lasting a little over 22 minutes. Reentry into Earth's atmosphere (100 km/60 miles) of the 15-year-old space station occurred at 05:44 UTC near Nadi, Fiji.

Major destruction of the station began around 05:52 UTC and the unburned fragments fell into the South Pacific Ocean around 06:00 UTC.




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