UFOs and Reverse Engineering
Process of Discovering the Technological Principles



UFOs and Reverse Engineering
Process of Discovering the Technological Principles

Reverse engineering is a common practice used by private industry and the government as a means to keep up with or surpass the competition. Has the US military derived various forms of technology, including stealth technology from downed UFO's?

Are we competing with extra-terrestrial beings using their downed craft as the genesis for advances in modern technology? Follow a team from UFO magazine as they investigate the possibility that the technology providing us with fiber optics, night vision and the microchip, just to name a few, were derived from wreckage obtained from Roswell and other UFO crash sites.


The UFO Hunters team looks into lingering rumors that advanced military aircraft, such as the SR-71 Blackbird and B-2 Spirit Bomber, were designed from reverse engineered alien technology.

Reverse engineering (RE) is the process of
discovering the technological principles of a device, object or system through analysis of its structure, function and operation.

It often involves taking something (e.g., a mechanical device, electronic component, or software program) apart and analyzing its workings in detail to be used in maintenance, or to try to make a new device or program that does the same thing without utilizing any physical part of the original.

Reverse engineering has its origins in the analysis of hardware for commercial or military advantage. The purpose is to deduce design decisions from end products with little or no additional knowledge about the procedures involved in the original production.

The same techniques are subsequently being researched for application to legacy software systems, not for industrial or defence ends, but rather to replace incorrect, incomplete, or otherwise unavailable documentation.

It is believed by many that the US Military has used Reverse Engineering from alien technology to build advanced military aircraft such as the SR-71 Blackbird and B-2 Spirit Bomber.

SR-71 "Blackbird"


The Lockheed SR-71 "Blackbird" was an advanced, long-range, Mach 3+ strategic reconnaissance aircraft. It was developed from the Lockheed A-12 reconnaissance aircraft in the 1960s by the Lockheed Skunk Works as a black project.

Clarence "Kelly" Johnson was responsible for many of the design's innovative concepts.

During reconnaissance missions the SR-71 operated at high speeds and altitudes to allow it to outrace threats; if a surface-to-air missile launch was detected, standard evasive action was simply to accelerate.

The SR-71 was in service with the U.S. Air Force from 1964 to 1998. Twelve of the 32 aircraft were destroyed in accidents; none were lost to enemy action.

The SR-71 was unofficially named the Blackbird, and called the Habu by its crews, referring to an Okinawan species of pit viper.

Since 1976, it has held the world record for the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft, a record previously held by the YF-12.



B-2 Spirit Bomber


The Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit (also known as the Stealth Bomber) is an American heavy bomber with "low observable" stealth technology designed to penetrate dense anti-aircraft defenses and deploy both conventional and nuclear weapons.

Because of its considerable capital and operational costs, the project was controversial in the U.S. Congress and among the Joint Chiefs of Staff. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Congress slashed initial plans to purchase 132 bombers to just 21.

Manufactured by Northrop Grumman, the cost of each aircraft averaged US$737 million in 1997 dollars ($1.01 billion today). Total procurement costs averaged US$929 million per aircraft ($1.27 billion today), which includes spare parts, equipment, retrofitting, and software support.

The total program cost, which includes development, engineering and testing, averaged US$2.1 billion per aircraft (in 1997 dollars, $2.87 billion today).

Twenty B-2s are operated by the United States Air Force. Though originally designed in the 1980s for Cold War operations scenarios, B-2s were first used in combat to drop bombs on Serbia during the Kosovo War in 1999, and saw continued use during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

One aircraft was lost in 2008 when it crashed just after takeoff; the crew ejected safely. B-2s were also used during the 2011 Libyan uprising. The bomber has a crew of two and can drop up to 80 x 500 lb (230 kg)-class JDAM GPS-guided bombs, or 16 x 2,400 lb (1,100 kg) B83 nuclear bombs in a single pass through extremely dense anti-aircraft defenses.

The B-2 is the only aircraft that can carry large air to surface standoff weapons in a stealth configuration. The program has been the subject of espionage and counter-espionage activity and the B-2 has provided prominent public spectacles at air shows since the 1990s.