The Boy Who Lived Before
Can the Dead be Reborn?



The Boy Who Lived Before
Extraordinary People - Can the Dead be Reborn?

Can the dead be reborn? Is there life after death? This little boy believes there is. Cameron remembers a past life in the remote Scottish island of Barra over 200 miles away from his home in Glasgow.

He believes he lived in a white house in Barra in another life with his mom and dad and his three brothers and sisters.

He describes it was just like a hole and he fell through.

Children throughout the world report memories of previous lives.


Reincarnation is believed to occur when the soul or spirit, after the death  of the body, comes back to Earth in a newborn body. This phenomenon is also known as transmigration of the soul.

This doctrine is a central tenet within the majority of Indian religious traditions, such as Hinduism, Jainism, and Sikhism; the Buddhist  concept of rebirth is also often referred to as reincarnation.


The idea was also fundamental to some Greek philosophers and religions as well as other religions, such as Druidism.

It is also found in many small-scale societies around the world, in places such as Siberia, West Africa, North America, and Australia.


The word "reincarnation" derives from Latin, literally meaning, "entering the flesh again". The Greek equivalent metempsychosis (μετεμψύχωσις) roughly corresponds to the common English phrase "transmigration of the soul" and also usually connotes reincarnation after death, as either human, animal, though emphasising the continuity of the soul, not the flesh.

The term has been used by modern philosophers such as Kurt Gödel and has entered the English language. Another Greek term sometimes used synonymously is palingenesis, "being born again".

In the latter part of the 20th century, Ian Stevenson, a psychiatrist-parapsychologist at the University of Virginia, gained a level of prominence for publishing more than 3,000 case studies from around the world of children that seemed to him to be able to remember events in a life that had ended, often in a violent way, before the child was born.

Stevenson compared each child's account with the personal history of the deceased and attempted to gather information before any contact between the child and the deceased's family had occurred.

The cases that Stevenson reported were most often from children between the ages of three and seven years, and the children seemed to forget these reported memories shortly thereafter.

Stevenson believed that the best evidence for reincarnation was the existence of birth marks and congenital deformities on children which he reported corresponded to fatal wounds of the deceased.

He also proposed that unusual behaviors, such as phobias for the thing that killed the deceased, and in some cases the mother having a dream in which the deceased announces their intention to reincarnate in the child, were also evidence of reincarnation or other paranormal process such as extrasensory perception.

Stevenson also searched for evidence that could provide alternative explanations for the reports aside from reincarnation, discounting some reports.

Stevenson's work tended to polarize opinion: While supporters see him as a misunderstood genius, skeptics found him to be gullible and superstitious.

Some reviewers praised Stevenson for the scientific rigor they saw in his investigations, while others criticized his interpretations and conclusions as being unwarranted supposition. 


Though Stevenson avoided speculating on physical mechanisms for reincarnation, subsequent researchers from his group have appealed to quantum mechanics as an explanation in a way that is criticized by experts as being based on incorrect or pseudoscientific interpretations.

Researchers who believe in the evidence for reincarnation have been unsuccessful in getting the scientific community to consider it a serious possibility.

 
Cameron Macauley is a young boy in Glasgow; he lives with his single mother and his older brother. But Cameron inexplicably remembers another life before his current one.


Ian Stevenson, a psychiatrist - parapsychologist at the University of Virginia, gained a level of prominence for publishing more than 3,000 case studies from around the world of children that seemed to him to be able to remember events in a life that had ended, often in a violent way, before the child was born.

Stevenson considered that the concept of reincarnation might supplement those of heredity and environment in helping modern medicine to understand aspects of human behavior and development.