Nibiru Collision
Doomsday Conspiracy Theory



Nibiru Collision - Doomsday Conspiracy Theory
Earth's Imminent Collision or Near Miss with a Giant Planetoid


The Nibiru collision is a supposed disastrous encounter between the Earth and a large planetary object (either a collision or a near-miss) which certain groups believe will take place in the early 21st century.

Believers in this doomsday event usually refer to this object as Planet X or Nibiru. The idea that a planet-sized object could possibly collide with or pass by Earth in the near future is not supported by any scientific evidence and has been rejected as pseudoscience by astronomers and planetary scientists.


The idea was first proposed in 1995 by Nancy Lieder, founder of the website ZetaTalk.

Lieder describes herself as a contactee with the ability to receive messages from extra-terrestrials from the Zeta Reticuli star system through an implant in her brain.


She states that she was chosen to warn mankind that the object would sweep through the inner Solar System in May 2003 (though that date was later abandoned) causing Earth to undergo a pole shift that would destroy most of humanity.

The predicted collision has subsequently spread beyond Lieder's website and has been embraced by numerous internet doomsday groups, most of which link the event to the 2012 phenomenon. 


Although the name "Nibiru" is derived from the works of ancient astronaut writer Zecharia Sitchin and his interpretations of Babylonian and Sumerian mythology, Sitchin himself denies any connection between his work and various claims of a coming apocalypse.

Astronomers point out that such an object so close to Earth would be easily visible to the naked eye (Jupiter and Saturn  are both visible to the naked eye, and are dimmer than Nibiru would be at their distances), and would be creating noticeable effects in the orbits of the outer planets.

Some counter this by claiming that the object has been hiding behind the Sun for several years, though such a claim is geometrically impossible.

Images of Nibiru near the Sun taken by amateurs are usually of lens flares, false images of the Sun created by reflections within the lens.


There have been over 44 failed & 1 ambiguous end-of-the-world predictions that were considered credible by many of the mass population of the world that were to occur between the years 30 & 1920.
 
The Nibiru collision is a supposed disastrous encounter between the Earth and a large planetary object (either a collision or a near-miss) which certain groups believe will take place in the early 21st century. Believers in this doomsday event usually refer to this object as Planet X or Nibiru.

There have been thousands of End-of-the-World prophecies throughout the ages and the Nibiru collision is yet another one to add to the list. 


An Apocalypse is a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception, i.e. the veil to be lifted.


The term also can refer to the eschatological final battle, the Armageddon, and the idea of an end of the world.



Nibiru's Orbit

Some proponents of doomsday in 2012 claim that a planet called Planet X or Nibiru will collide with or pass by Earth in that year.

This idea, which has appeared in various forms within New Age circles since 1995, initially slated the event for 2003 but abandoned that date after it passed without incident.

It originated from claims of channeling of alien beings and has been widely ridiculed.

Astronomers calculate that such an object so close to Earth would be visible to anyone looking up at the night sky.

It is believed by some that Nibiru's orbit passes Earth every 3600 years. 
Nibiru Origins

The idea of the Nibiru encounter originated with Nancy Lieder, a Wisconsin woman who claims that as a girl she was contacted by gray extraterrestrials called Zetas, who implanted a communications device in her brain.

In 1995, she founded the website ZetaTalk to disseminate her ideas.

Lieder first came to public attention on internet newsgroups during the build-up to Comet Hale-Bopp's 1997 perihelion. She stated, speaking as the Zetas, that "The Hale-Bopp comet does not exist.

It is a fraud, perpetrated by those who would have the teeming masses quiescent until it is too late. Hale-Bopp is nothing more than a distant star, and will draw no closer."

She claimed that the Hale-Bopp story was manufactured to distract people from the imminent arrival of a large planetary object, "Planet X", which would soon pass by Earth and destroy civilization.

After Hale-Bopp's perihelion revealed it as one of the brightest and longest-observed comets of the last century, Lieder removed the first two sentences of her initial statement from her site, though they can still be found in Google's archives.

Her claims eventually made the New York Times. Lieder described Planet X as roughly four times the size of the Earth, and said that its perigee would occur on May 27th, 2003, resulting in the Earth's rotation ceasing for exactly 5.9 terrestrial days.

This would be followed by the Earth's pole destabilising in a pole shift (a physical pole shift, with the Earth's pole physically moving, rather than a geomagnetic reversal) caused by magnetic attraction between the Earth's core and the magnetism of the passing planet. This in turn would disrupt the Earth's magnetic core and lead to subsequent displacement of the Earth's crust.

Lieder's Planet X idea first spread beyond her website in 2001, when Mark Hazlewood, a former member of the ZetaTalk community, took her ideas and published them in a book: Blindsided: Planet X Passes in 2003. Lieder would later accuse him of being a confidence trickster.

A Japanese cult called the Pana Wave Laboratory, which blocked off roads and rivers with white cloths to protect itself from electromagnetic attacks, also warned that the world would end in May 2003 after the approach of a tenth planet.

Roughly a week before the supposed arrival of Planet X, Lieder appeared on KROQ radio in Los Angeles, and advised listeners to put their pets down in anticipation of the event. When asked if she had done so, she replied that she had, and that "The puppies are in a happy place." She also advised that "A dog makes a good meal".

After the 2003 date passed without incident, Lieder said that it was merely a "White Lie ... to fool the establishment," and said that to disclose the true date would give those in power enough time to declare martial law and trap people in cities during the shift, leading to their deaths.

Many internet sites continue to proclaim that Lieder's object is en route to Earth, often citing its arrival date as December, 2012. This date has gathered many apocalyptic associations, as it is the end of the current cycle (baktun) in the long count in the Mayan calendar.

Several writers have published books connecting the collision with 2012. Hazlewood has since changed his views on Planet X, and now says that there are intelligent alien forces acting to protect us as a species, and that we are set to ascend to a higher level of consciousness in 2012.


 

The Nibiru collision was first proposed in 1995 by Nancy Lieder, founder of the website ZetaTalk. Lieder describes herself as a contactee with the ability to receive messages from extra-terrestrials from the Zeta Reticuli star system through an implant in her brain.
 
Nostradamus: 2012

From the mystical realms of the Guatemalan jungles to the Hopi elders and Mayan shaman to respected thinkers of the modern age--Nostradamus' doomsday warning will be cast in a frighteningly modern context.

Most of the quatrains deal with disasters, such as plagues, earthquakes, wars, floods, invasions, murders, droughts, and battles – all undated and based on foreshadowings by the Mirabilis Liber.

Some quatrains cover these disasters in overall terms; others concern a single person or small group of people. Some cover a single town, others several towns in several countries.

A major, underlying theme is an impending invasion of Europe by Muslim forces from further east and south headed by the expected Antichrist, directly reflecting the then-current Ottoman invasions and the earlier Saracen (that is, Arab) equivalents, as well as the prior expectations of the Mirabilis Liber.

All of this is presented in the context of the supposedly imminent end of the world – even though this is not in fact mentioned – a conviction that sparked numerous collections of end-time prophecies at the time, not least an unpublished collection by Christopher Columbus.

Nostradamus enthusiasts have credited him with predicting numerous events in world history, from the Great Fire of London, by way of the rise of Napoleon I of France and Adolf Hitler, to the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, but only ever in hindsight.

Skeptics such as James Randi suggest that his reputation as a prophet is largely manufactured by modern-day supporters who fit his words to events that have either already occurred or are so imminent as to be inevitable, a process sometimes known as "retroactive clairvoyance".

There is no evidence in the academic literature to suggest that any Nostradamus quatrain has ever been interpreted as predicting a specific event before it occurred, other than in vague, general terms that could equally apply to any number of other events. In particular, no quatrain suggests, as is often claimed by books and films on the alleged 'Mayan Prophecy', that the world will end in December 2012.



Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura
Apocalypse 2012

It's believed that the world is heading for disaster in 2012 and the government is preparing to save and protect the elite - while leaving the rest of us to fend for ourselves.

Jesse Ventura investigates claims of top secret underground bunkers being built in places ranging from the Nevada desert to the White House, including the largest, now under construction beneath a major metropolitan airport.


The 2012 phenomenon comprises a range of eschatological beliefs that cataclysmic or transformative events will occur on December 21st, 2012, which is said to be the end-date of a 5,125-year-long cycle in the Mayan Long Count calendar.


Various astronomical alignments and numerological formulae related to this date have been proposed.


A New Age interpretation of this transition posits that during this time Earth and its inhabitants may undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation, and that 2012 may mark the beginning of a new era. Others suggest that the 2012 date marks the end of the world or a similar catastrophe.


Scenarios posited for the end of the world include the Earth's collision with a passing planet which is often referred to as "Nibiru" or black hole, or the arrival of the next solar maximum.


Scholars from various disciplines have dismissed the idea of catastrophe in 2012. Mainstream Mayanist scholars state that predictions of impending doom are not found in any of the existing classic Maya accounts, and that the idea that the Long Count calendar "ends" in 2012 misrepresents Maya history.


The modern Maya do not consider the date significant, and the classical sources on the subject are scarce and contradictory, suggesting that there was little if any universal agreement among them about what, if anything, the date might mean. Additionally, astronomers and other scientists have rejected the apocalyptic forecasts as pseudoscience, stating that the anticipated events are contradicted by simple astronomical observations.


NASA has compared fears about 2012 with those about the approaching millennium in the late 1990s, suggesting that an adequate analysis should preclude fears of disaster. None of the proposed alignments or formulas have been accepted by mainstream scholarship.


 
Planet X Nibiru


Nibiru's orbit passes thorough our solar system only once every 3,600 years, which is equal to one Nibiru year. This controversial theory is based on an interpretation of ancient Sumerian texts, with its origin in the Bible, in the book of Genesis.

Many believers in the imminent approach of Planet X/Nibiru accuse NASA of deliberately covering up visual evidence of its existence. One such accusation involves the IRAS infrared space observatory, launched in 1983.

The satellite briefly made headlines due to an "unknown object" that was at first described as "possibly as large as the giant planet Jupiter and possibly so close to Earth that it would be part of this Solar System".

This newspaper article has been cited by proponents of the collision idea, beginning with Lieder herself, as evidence for the existence of Nibiru. However, further analysis revealed that of several unidentified objects, nine were distant galaxies and the tenth was "intergalactic cirrus"; none were found to be Solar System bodies.

Another accusation frequently made by websites predicting the collision is that the US government built the South Pole Telescope to track Nibiru's trajectory, and that the object has been imaged optically. However, the SPT (which is not funded by NASA) is a radio telescope, and cannot take optical images.

Its South Pole location was chosen due to the low-humidity environment, and there is no way an approaching object could be seen only from the South Pole. The "picture" of Nibiru posted on YouTube was revealed to in fact be a Hubble image of the expanding gas shell around the star V838 Mon.

The impact of the public fear of the Nibiru collision has been especially felt by professional astronomers. Mike Brown now says that Nibiru is the most common pseudoscientific topic he is asked about.


Life After People

The Series begins in the moments after people disappear. As each day, month, and year passes, the fate of a particular environment, city or theme is disclosed.

Special effects, combined with interviews from top experts in the fields of engineering, botany, biology, geology, and archeology provide an unforgettable visual journey through the ultimately hypothetical.


As modern metropolises like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Washington DC are ravaged by nature; the series exposes the surprising insights about how they function today.


Basing this futuristic world on the surprising history of real locations, already abandoned by man, like a century-old shack in the arctic and an abandoned island that was once the most densely populated place on earth are featured in the series.


In every episode, viewers will witness the epic destruction of iconic structures and buildings, from the Sears Tower, Astrodome, and Chrysler Building to the Sistine Chapel - - allowing viewers to learn how they were built and why they were so significant.


Big Ben will stop ticking within days; the International Space Station will plummet to earth within a few short years, while historic objects, like the Declaration of Independence and the mummified remains of King Tutankhamen will remain for decades.


The series will also explore the creatures that might take our place. With humans gone, animals will inherit the places where we once lived. Elephants that escape from the LA zoo will thrive in a region once dominated by their ancestors, the wooly mammoth. Alligators will move into sub-tropical cities like Houston - feeding off household pets.


Tens of thousands of hogs, domesticated for food, will flourish. In a world without people, new stories of predators, survival and evolution will emerge. Humans won't be around forever, and now we can see in detail, for the very first time, the world that will be left behind in Life After People



Decoding The Past: Doomsday 2012


David Morrison, director of SETI, CSI Fellow and Senior Scientist at NASA's Astrobiology Institute at Ames Research Center, says he receives 20–25 emails a week about the impending arrival of Nibiru; some frightened, others angry and naming him as part of the conspiracy to keep the truth of the impending apocalypse from the public, and still others asking whether or not they should kill themselves, their children or their pets.

Half of these emails are from outside the US. "Planetary scientists are being driven to distraction by Nibiru," notes science writer Govert Schilling, "And it is not surprising; you devote so much time, energy and creativity to fascinating scientific research, and find yourself on the tracks of the most amazing and interesting things, and all the public at large is concerned about is some crackpot theory about clay tablets, god-astronauts and a planet that doesn't exist."

Morrison states that he hopes that the non-arrival of Nibiru could serve as a teaching moment for the public, instructing them on 'rational thought and baloney detection', but doubts that will happen. Morrison noted in a lecture recorded on FORA.tv that there was a huge disconnect between the massive number of people on the internet who believed in Nibiru's arrival in 2012 and the majority of scientists who have never heard of it.

To date he is the only major NASA scientist to speak out regularly against the Nibiru phenomenon. A viral marketing campaign for Sony Pictures' 2009 film 2012, directed by Roland Emmerich, which depicts the end of the world in that year, featured a supposed warning from the "Institute for Human Continuity" that lists the arrival of Planet X as one of its doomsday scenarios. Mike Brown attributes a spike in concerned emails and phone calls he received from the public to this site.

End-of-the-world predictions cause mass panic which is generally the main reason why the individual created the prediction in the first place. They want the mass population to panic and feel out of control, this creates a feeling of power and control to the creator of the prediction.