Mysterious Treasure on Oak Island
The so-called Money Pit - Over 200 Years of Treasure Hunting




 
Mysterious Treasure on Oak Island
The so-called Money Pit - Over 200 Years of Treasure Hunting

 
Oak Island is a 140-acre island in Lunenburg County on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The tree-covered island is one of about 360 small islands in Mahone Bay and rises to a maximum of 35 feet above sea level.

Oak Island is noted as the location of the so-called Money Pit and the site of over 200 years of treasure hunting. Repeated excavations have reported layers of apparently man-made artifacts as deep as 31 meters, but ended in collapsed excavations and flooding.

Critics argue that there is no treasure and that the pit is a natural phenomenon, likely a sinkhole.



"Forty feet below, two million pounds is buried." This cryptic inscription on a stone uncovered at the 100-foot level of the Oak Island "money pit" has kept treasure hunters digging for almost 200 years.

Over the centuries, Oak Island, which lies just off the coast of Nova Scotia, has gobbled up the resources and lives of many men without producing a single doubloon.


Designed by some ancient engineer, the pit is a complex hole with timber crosspieces every 10 feet. Near the 100-foot level, any attempt to break through brings the Atlantic Ocean rushing in. So far, all efforts to solve the puzzle of the protective design have failed.

Even using the most modern technology, no one has been able to get through to those two million pounds... 50 billion dollars. Who built it and why?


Oak Island is a 140-acre (57 ha) island in Lunenburg County on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The tree-covered island is one of about 360 small islands in Mahone Bay and rises to a maximum of 35 feet (11 m) above sea level.

Located 200 metres from shore and connected to the mainland by a modern causeway, the island is privately owned, and advance permission is required for any visitation.

Oak Island is noted as the location of the so-called Money Pit and the site of over 200 years of treasure hunting.

Repeated excavations have reported layers of apparently man-made artifacts as deep as 31 meters, but ended in collapsed excavations and flooding.

Critics argue that there is no treasure and that the pit is a natural phenomenon, likely a sinkhole.

There are many 19th-century accounts of Oak Island, but some are conflicting and/or are not impartial. Further, physical evidence from the initial excavations are absent or have been lost.

A basic summary of the history of the pit is as follows: In 1795, 16-year-old Daniel McGinnis, after observing lights coming from the island, discovered a circular depression in a clearing on the southeastern end of the island with an adjacent tree which had a tackle block on one of its overhanging branches.

Daniel McGuinnis, with the help of friends John Smith (in early accounts, Samuel Ball) and Anthony Vaughan, excavated the depression and discovered a layer of flagstones a few feet below. On the pit walls there were visible markings from a pick.

As they dug down they discovered layers of logs at about every 10 feet (3.0 m). They abandoned the excavation at 30 feet (9.1 m). This initial discovery and excavation was first briefly mentioned in print in the Liverpool Transcript in October 1856.

There has been wide-ranging speculation amongst enthusiasts as to who originally dug the pit and what it might contain. Later accounts say that oak platforms were discovered every 10 feet (3.0 m), but the earliest accounts simply say that "marks" of some type were found at these places.

They also say there were "tool marks" or pick scrapes on the walls of the money pit and that the dirt was noticeably loose and not as hard packed as the surrounding soil. One expedition said they found the flood tunnel at 90 feet, and that it was lined with flat stones. However, Robert Dunfield (a trained geologist) wrote that he carefully examined the walls of the re-excavated pit and was unable to locate any evidence of this tunnel.

The Oak Island Money Pit Mystery


Others have speculated that the Oak Island pit was dug to hold treasure much more exotic than gold or silver.

In his 1953 book, The Oak Island Enigma: A History and Inquiry Into the Origin of the Money Pit, Penn Leary believed that English philosopher Francis Bacon used the pit to hide documents proving him to be the author of William Shakespeare's plays.

This theory was elaborated on by author and researcher Mark Finnan. The theory was also used in the Norwegian book Organisten (The Organ Player) by Erlend Loe and Petter Amundsen.

It has also been asserted that the pit may have been dug by exiled Knights Templar and that it is the last resting place of the Holy Grail or even the holy Ark of the Covenant.

The cipher stone, which one researcher is said to have translated to read "Forty feet below two million pounds is buried", was allegedly last seen in the early 20th century (exact dates are a topic of controversy). Some accounts state that Smith used it as a fireback in his fireplace, while others claim it was last seen as a doorstep in a Halifax bookbinder's shop.

The accuracy of the translation, whether the symbols as commonly depicted are accurate, or if they meant anything at all, remains disputed. Barry Fell, the author of the controversial books America B.C. and Saga America, was sent a copy of the inscription by the chief archivist of the Nova Scotia Archives in the late 1970s.

Fell, whose publications consisted largely of alleged translations of inscriptions on stones found elsewhere in North America, concluded that the symbols were similar to the Coptic alphabet and when translated implied that the people needed to remember their God or else they would perish.

Man-made structures under Oak Island do in fact exist as discussed in many books, including a book written by Lee Lamb, daughter of Robert Restall. Whether these structures are the remains of prior excavation attempts or artifacts left behind by those who allegedly built the Money Pit are unknown.