NASA Sets News Conference on Astrobiology Discovery
Has NASA Discovered some Form of Life?



NASA Sets News Conference on Astrobiology Discovery
Has NASA Discovered some Form of Life?

The news spread fast that NASA has an announcement on an astrobiology discovery, what that discovery is still remains unknown.

But most are thinking it has something to do with either water or bacterial life. Many websites have been stating that it could be evidence of extraterrestrial life but it is highly doubtful.


If NASA did find extraterrestrial life elsewhere the chances that this would be announced to the public is quite low and if there was an announcement it is believed that NASA would not be the organization announcing it, it would most likely be the president of the United States or some other government official. But again, an organization making such an announcement about this topic to the public is quite low.

Governments and other organizations around the world would be quite fearful of the reaction that would occur to the general public as a whole by such an announcement.

NASA stated that they have an "astrobiology discovery". And the very definition of astrabiology is: the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe.

Popular blogger Jason Kottke and others have concluded that the announcement will tie into the quest for life on the Martianmoon Titan. "I'd say that they've discovered arsenic on Titan and maybe even detected chemical evidence of bacteria utilizing it for photosynthesis," Kottke theorizes, a hypothesis short of actually confirming alien life.

NASA Sets News Conference on Astrobiology Discovery; Science Journal Has Embargoed Details Until 2 p.m. EST On Dec. 2nd, 2010.
 
WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a news conference at 2 p.m. EST on Thursday, Dec. 2, to discuss an astrobiology finding that will impact the search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution and future of life in the universe.

The news conference will be held at the NASA Headquarters auditorium at 300 E St. SW, in Washington. It will be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed on the agency's website at http://www.nasa.gov.

Participants are:
  • Mary Voytek, director, Astrobiology Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington
  • Felisa Wolfe-Simon, NASA astrobiology research fellow, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.
  • Pamela Conrad, astrobiologist, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
  • Steven Benner, distinguished fellow, Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, Gainesville, Fla.
  • James Elser, professor, Arizona State University, Tempe 
 
NASA has announced that it has discovered life in an area which was thought impossible.

Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic.

The microorganism substitutes arsenic for phosphorus in its cell components.


 


NASA-Funded Research Discovers

Life Built with Toxic Chemical

NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth.

Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic.

The microorganism substitutes arsenic for phosphorus in its cell components.

This finding of an alternative biochemistry makeup will alter biology textbooks
and expand the scope of the search for life beyond Earth.

The research is published in this week's edition of Science Express.






NASA Discovers Strange Bacteria


The discovery of a strange bacteria that can use arsenic as one of its nutrients widens the scope for finding new forms of life on Earth and possibly beyond, NASA scientists said on Thursday.

While researchers discovered the unusual bacteria here on Earth, they say it shows that life has possibilities beyond the major elements that have been considered essential.

Six major elements have long been considered essential for life - carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur.

At a news conference on Thursday at NASA headquarters in Washington, researchers announced that they had found that a bacteria, discovered in Mono Lake, California, is able to continue to grow after substituting arsenic for phosphorus.


While this news may be disappointing to some, it is still big news in the scientific community.

Extrateresstrial life is still a very high probability. Based on observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, there are at least 125 billion galaxies in the Universe.

It is estimated that at least ten percent of all sun-like stars have a system of planets (i.e. there are 6.25×1018 stars with planets orbiting them in the universe.) Even if we assume that only one out of a billion of these stars have planets supporting life, there would be some 6.25×109 (billion) life-supporting planetary systems in the Universe.