Bigfoot - Sasquatch Evidence Analysis
Bigfoot's Reflection




Bigfoot (Sasquatch Evidence Analysis)
Ape-like Creature that Inhabits Forests, mainly in the Pacific Northwest Region of North America


A glimpse into the techniques of a Bigfoot Field Researcher.

Cliff Barackman, a fourth grade teacher has dedicated much of the last twenty years to his search for the ever-elusive Sasquatch. He has never seen one of these creatures but continues his quest reassured by scientific data and the word of the others.


Shot on location in high definition in the Northwest Pacific rain forests, Bigfoot's Reflection is an hour long modern psychological and ecological POV exploration of the giant ape-man legend of North America from the perspective of those who choose to study it and guard its wild habitat.

BFR examines the struggles of the few influential scientists (John Bindernagal, Robert Pyle), researchers (John Green, Bill Miller, John Kirk lll, Tomas Steenburg, Richard Noll) and Native American guide (Mel Skahan) who have committed themselves to the puzzling legend -- even in the face of ridicule - as they strive to bring humanity and a scientific method to the pursuit of the elusive creature.

Bigfoot's Reflection pores over the principal evidence of the last fifty years and plunges into those cold, rugged and dark places where the final proof continues to elude them; a place where few hazard to even venture. Can it be said that the creature they seek lives within them too?


Bigfoot is described in reports as a large hairy ape-like creature, ranging between 6–10 feet (2–3 m) tall, weighing in excess of 500 pounds (230 kg), and covered in dark brown or dark reddish hair.

Alleged witnesses have described large eyes, a pronounced brow ridge, and a large, low-set forehead; the top of the head has been described as rounded and crested, similar to the sagittal crest of the male gorilla.

Bigfoot is commonly reported to have a strong, unpleasant smell by those who claim to have encountered it. The enormous footprints for which it is named have been as large as 24 inches (60 cm) long and 8 inches (20 cm) wide.

While most casts have five toes—like all known apes—some casts of alleged Bigfoot tracks have had numbers ranging from two to six.

Some have also contained claw marks, making it likely that a portion came from known animals such as bears, which have five toes and claws.

Some proponents have also claimed that Bigfoot is omnivorous and mainly nocturnal.
 
Bigfoot is described in reports as a large hairy ape-like creature, ranging between 6–10 feet (2–3 m) tall, weighing in excess of 500 pounds (230 kg), and covered in dark brown or dark reddish hair.



Various types of creatures have been suggested to explain both the sightings and what type of creature Bigfoot would be if it existed. The scientific community typically attributes sightings to either hoaxes or misidentification of known animals and their tracks.

While cryptozoologists generally explain Bigfoot as an unknown ape, some believers in Bigfoot attribute the phenomenon to UFOs or other paranormal causes.

A minority of proponents of a natural explanation have attributed Bigfoot to animals that are not apes such as the giant ground sloth.


There are several organizations dedicated to the research and investigation of Bigfoot sightings in the United States. The oldest and largest is the Bigfoot Field Research Organization, or BFRO, considered the leader in the field.

The BFRO also provides a free database for other organizations or individuals interested. Their internet website includes reports from across North America that have actually been investigated by researchers to determine credibility.



Sasquatch

Clip from an old docudrama film that was called 'Sasquatch'.

Nothing ruins a wilderness trip like begin attacked by a band of menacing ape-men, but that's just what Fred Beck and four of fellow his gold miners claim happened to them on a prospecting job in Mount St. Helens in the summer of 1924.

According to Beck, the men had just settled down to sleep for the night when they were awakened by an attack on their cabin. Someone — or something — was pounding the roof with rocks and trying to tear down their humble yet sturdy abode. Shocked, they grabbed their rifles and began shooting at the intruders.


The fighting continued all night long, so the story goes, but none of the men were seriously hurt. By morning, an eerie quiet had entered the camp and as the men cautiously exited the cabin, they saw an ape-man in the distance. They shot at the beast several times and it finally fell over the cliff into the canyon. It was the only one of their attackers they would see.


The men packed their belongings in a hurry — leaving most things behind — and made their way home, promising each other not to speak of the incident to anyone. Alas, the story was leaked and within a few weeks it was picked up by the local newspaper, which dubbed the beasts the "Ape-Men of Mount St. Helens."



Ape Canyon is a gorge along the edge of the Plains of Abraham on the northeast shoulder of Mount St. Helens in the state of Washington. The gorge narrowed to as close as eight feet at one point. The name alludes to a reported encounter with several "apemen" in 1924, an event later incorporated into Bigfoot folklore.

Ape Canyon was heavily impacted by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Adjacent to the steep rocky canyon is the present Ape Canyon trail, popular with hikers and mountain bikers. On the south side of the mountain is another feature named Ape Cave.

Ape Canyon was reportedly the site of a violent encounter in 1924 between a group of miners and a group of apemen. These allegations were reported on in the July 16th, 1924 issue of The Oregonian.

Fred Beck, one of the miners, claimed they shot and possibly killed at least one of the creatures, precipitating an attack on their cabin, during which the creatures bombarded the cabin with rocks and tried to break-in.

Beck detailed his claims in a book written in 1967, in which he identified the creatures as mystical beings from another dimension, explaining that he had experienced psychic premonitions and visions his entire life of which the apemen were only one component.

William Halliday, director of the Western Speleological Survey, claimed in his 1983 pamphlet Ape Cave and the Mount Saint Helens Apes that the miner's assailants were actually local youths.

Until the eruption of Mt. St. Helens counselors from the YMCA's Camp Meehan on nearby Spirit Lake brought hikers to the canyon's edge and related a tradition that the 1924 incident was actually the result of young campers throwing light pumice stones into the canyon, not realizing there were miners at the bottom.

Looking up the miners would have only seen dark moonlit figures throwing stones at their cabin. The narrow walls of the canyon would have served to distort the voices of the YMCA campers enough to frighten the men below.