Solinus: Collectanea rerum memorabilium – Collection of remarkable things
The only existing English translation of the Collectanea rerum memorabilium that I know of is by Arthur Golding, and dates to 1587; a modern facsimile edition was published in 1955. A 2011 PhD thesis by Arwen Apps offers a critical study of the Collectanea; according to Wikipedia, this involves a translation but the thesis abstract makes no mention of one. It is, in any case, not readily available.

A HTML version of Mommsen's 1895 edition of the Latin text is available at The Latin Library; a scanned book version of the same edition can be found at the Internet Archive.

An online version of Golding's translation is currently being prepared on this site (see links below). The text is certainly in the public domain; the copyright status of the facsimile edition is not entirely clear – as no editorial or creative additions have been made, it is probably considered public domain in some jurisdictions, but not in all. To avoid possible copyright infringement, and for ease of reading and access, I will transcribe rather than scan the text for access on this site: it will be a slow process, but more worthwhile in the end.

The text will be transcribed without change to spelling, though it will be updated to modern orthographic practice (so no long 's' and no thorn, 'u' and 'v' used as appropriate). Golding's presentation of Latin names can be a bit capricious, but even readers without much facility in Latin will be able to check them against Mommsen's Latin edition for clarification.


Latin
Library
Solinus, ed. Mommsen (1895) Collectanea Rerum Memorabilium. Berlin: Weidmann. http://www.archive.org/stream/civliisolinicol00soligoog#page/n6/mode/2up
HTML version available at The Latin Library http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/solinus5.html

   
Solinus, trans. Golding (1587 [1955]) The Excellent and Pleasant Worke of Iulius Solinus Polyhistor. Gainsville, FL: Scholars' Facsimiles & Reprints. —Facsimile reproduction of Arthur Golding's translation from the Latin, with an introduction by George Kish. Originally printed in 1587 by I. Charlewoode for Thomas Hacket in London.
Only part of the text has been added so far: further sections will follow gradually.

Links to transcribed text:

Dedication and Bk I     II     III–VII     VIIIXVI     XVIIXXVI     XXVIIXXXII     XXXIIIXLIX     LLVI