Calendar

All meetings are held at NYU Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, NYC, unless otherwise noted.

2015


Monday, September 21, 2015

8:30 pm

Smilow Seminar Room
NYU Medical Center
550 First Avenue

C. Philip Wilson, MD Memorial Lecture

Psychoanalysis As Holocaust Survivor
Lecturer: Lewis Aron, PhD

Psychoanalysis was born under conditions of vulnerability. The role of persecution, marginalization, and immigration in the development of psychoanalysis has not been sufficiently studied. Psychoanalysis and historiographers of psychoanalysis have not paid sufficient attention to issues of racism, misogyny, homophobia, and anti-Semitism; to the trauma of immigration and displacement both in Europe and America; to the xenophobia of American postwar culture; to issues of class, the swing from economic depression to affluence; and to related socio-cultural changes. Understanding these patterns provides the context for examining the role of race, gender, religion, class, poverty, and sexual orientation in the history of psychoanalysis.

Educational Objective: Participants will be able to describe the impact of immigration from Europe in the 1930s on the history of American Psychoanalysis.

Lewis Aron, Ph.D., ABPP is the Director of the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. He is a past President of the Division of Psychoanalysis (39) APA; founding President of the International Association for Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy (IARPP); founding President of the Division of Psychologist-Psychoanalysts of NYSPA. The co-founder and co-chair of the Sándor Ferenczi Center at the New School for Social Research, an Honorary Member of the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Society, and Adjunct Professor, School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel; A co-founder of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and the co-editor of the Relational Perspectives Book Series; Author of A Meeting of Minds (1996), A Psychotherapy for the People (with Karen Starr); Editor of Relational Psychoanalysis: The Emergence of a Tradition (with Stephen Mitchell); co-editor of the Relational Perspectives Book Series, author and editor of numerous articles and books

Monday, October 19, 2015


8:15 pm

Alumni Hall B
NYU Medical Center
550 First avenue


Reconstructing Freud's Reconstructions: Little Sigmund in his Birthplace
Lecturer: Harold Blum, MD
***Pre-circulated paper, pre-registration required!***

Monday, November 16, 2015

8:15 pm

Alumni Hall B
NYU Medical Center
550 First Ave

Counter transferences to Patients Facing Death,  Reflections on Death Anxiety
Lecturer: Norman Straker, MD - DLFAPA, Clinical Professor Weill Cornell College Of Medicine, Consultant Memorial Sloan Kettering, Faculty NYPSI
 

This talk will document the negative consequences of the avoidance of facing death by patients, doctors and psychoanalysts. It will specifically address remedies for psychoanalytic intervention for an ever increasing population of  cancer patients who will benefit greatly by a psychoanalytic treatment.


Saturday, December 12, 2015

2 pm

NYU Medical Center
550 First Ave


PANEL: Depth Versus Chutzpah in Applied Psychoanalytic Studies
Panelists: Laurie Wilson PhD, Vera Camden PhD, Philip Freeman MD, David Miller MD

Four experienced psychoanalysts who are also accomplished practitioners of “Applied Analysis” will discuss the problems and possibilities of applying psychoanalytic ideas and approaches to the arts. It all started with Sigmund Freud. Many psychoanalysts since his pioneering work on Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Shakespeare have felt empowered to proceed as though their expertise in clinical work were sufficient to give them privileged access to important truths about the artists and their art. Unfortunately, too many of these studies are characterized by the chutzpah of the authors who blithely ignore the work of previous scholars as well as the scholarly disciplines related to each art form. Examples of work on literature, the visual arts, film and theatre will be considered.  The panelists will clarify their views of the “Dos” and “Don’ts” in applied analysis. 







2016

Saturday, February 20, 2016

2 pm

Alumni Hall B
NYU Medical Center
550 First avenue


PANEL: Seventy Years of The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child:  A Celebratory Romp
Panelists: Sam Abrams, MD, Claudia Lament, PhD, Rona Knight, PhD, Wendy Olesker, PhD

Saturday, March 19, 2016

2 pm

Alumni Hall A
NYU Medical Center
550 First avenue

Candidate Organized Panel
How Does Analysis Work? Towards an Understanding of Therapeutic Action.

Presenters:
Hamin Lee, MD; Peter Dunn, MD; Jaqueline Schachter, PhD; Jamieson Webster, PhD

Moderator:
Mudassar Iqbal, MD

Faculty Advisor:
Arnold Rothstein, MD

This panel discussion will offer richer ways of thinking about therapeutic action through the lens of various theoretical perspectives, including contemporary Freudian, Kleinian, and Lacanian views. Each panelist will describe how he/she thinks about therapeutic action and will present clinical material illustrating their implementation of these views in the analytic situation.

Educational Objectives
Participants will achieve a broad understanding of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis and become familiar with a range of perspectives about therapeutic action in the analytic situation.



Monday, April 18, 2016

8:15 pm

Smilow Seminar Room
NYU Medical Center
550 First Ave

Three Principles In Search of a Practice
Lecturer: Lawrence Friedman, M.D.

The first topic is the general relationship of unrealizable ideals to practical goals. Next we turn to psychoanalytic ideals (the “rules”) as formulated in Freud’s Papers on Technique. The meaning and function of those ideals – the sense in which they are, and are not, “rules” – is visible only in the sequential flow of the Papers. There we see the practical difficulties that forced these principles on Freud. Viewed that way, it is easier to understand what it means to respect such unrealizable ideals, and why that respect would be more – not less - urgent today when enactment is thought to be inescapable. Furthermore, experience guided by these ideals is probably the only way to discover the forces at work in all talking treatments. Finally, such a psychoanalysis is a unique inquiry into the composition of the human being.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:

Attendees will become more comfortable with the impossible ideals that are involved in all practical activities, and therefore in psychoanalysis. Analytic ideals will be appreciated as especially crucial, rather than outdated, in a field of continuous enactment. Attendees should gain an increased sense of what would be lost if a practice characterized by these ideals disappeared.
   


Monday, May 2, 2016

8:30 pm

Smilow Seminar Room
NYU Medical Center
550 First Avenue

51st Freud Anniversary Lecture

The Inner World, The Gut, and The Sense of Reality
Lecturer: Sheldon Bach, Ph.D.
Introduction: Arnold Rothstein, M.D.

Abstract:
 
This paper discusses a set of patients who at first did not seem to make a transference attachment to the analyst. They seem to lack evocative constancy and instead are constantly in motion and attached only to objects in the here and now. They all had early feeding disturbances and later gastrointestinal pathology. At first their transference was communicated more through gut variability than through experienced emotions.

 They all functioned at a very high level, but the desolation of their inner world interfered with their relationships and their sense of the reality of their experiences, although not with their reality testing. This led to unusual difficulties in integrating inner with outer, and some thoughts are presented about our illusions of wholeness and the normal difficulty of integrating subjective and objective reality.

Educational Objectives:

The listener will learn to recognize and understand those patients who do not seem to make the anticipated object transference to the analyst.

The listener will learn to recognize and understand complementary modalities of transference such as through the gut.

The listener will learn to recognize and understand the role of internal objects in supporting feelings of reality

 

Sheldon Bach Ph.D. is Adjunct Clinical Professor of Psychology at the New York University Postdoctoral Program for Psychoanalysis and training and supervising analyst at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research and The Contemporary Freudian Society.  He is a recipient of the Heinz Hartmann Award for  “outstanding contributions to the theory and practice of Psychoanalysis.”
























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