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Champaign County Local Food Policy Council--Resolution

posted Jan 17, 2012, 12:43 PM by Pattsi Petrie   [ updated Jul 12, 2012, 7:31 AM ]


The first meeting of the Champaign County Local Food Policy Council will be TODAY at 6 P in the Shields Room at Brookens, in case you do not already know. Everyone is welcome to attend and help shape the direction of the council.

You can look at the agenda here

http://www.co.champaign.il.us/countybd/2012LoCalFoods.htm

Feel free to share this information with others, P2  



FINAL VOTE ON THIS RESOLUTION WILL OCCUR AT THE 22 MARCH 2012 COUNTY BOARD MEETING


RESOLUTION PASSED 22 MARCH 2012

CHECK COUNTY BOARD WEB SITE FOR ONLINE APPLICATION TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL

Application deadline 27 April (consider applying before this date)

Appointment to the council scheduled during 24 May County Board meeting


http://www.co.champaign.il.us/countybd/appointments/LocalFoodsPolicyCouncil.htm#board


RESOLUTION NO. 8069

 

 

RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE CHAMPAIGN COUNTY LOCAL FOODS POLICY COUNCIL

 

 

            WHEREAS, the Champaign County Board has adopted Resolution No. 4872 establishing and endorsing a Champaign County Economic Development Policy; and

 

            WHEREAS, the Champaign County Economic Development Policy states as Goal ED-4 the following:  Preserve the strength of agriculture and agritourism, and the existing business base, while diversifying the local economy through objectives of:

·         Promote the growth of agriculture and agritourism that is both sustainable and profitable;

·         Encourage development of enterprises that add value to local agricultural production;

·         Encourage development of appropriate non-farm enterprises that augment income for farm families; and

 

WHEREAS, the Champaign County Board recognizes the establishment of a Local Foods Policy Council to encourage the establishment of small businesses; to encourage the offering of better and fresher food available locally; to encourage larger institutional entities to commit to the use of 10% of local food to support growth and the local economy; to encourage the efficient use of land, and preservation and conservation of agriculture; to encourage reduction in food transportation; and to promote educational resources for the local population, achieves the Champaign County Economic Development Policy Goal ED-4 and subsequent objectives;

 

WHEREAS, the Champaign County Board approves the establishment of a Local Food Policy Council to achieve the following stated purposes:

·         Enhance economic development and strengthen local food systems within the County;

·         Bring stakeholders together and provide mechanisms for seeking stakeholder advice and expertise;

·         Explore means for small business loans;

·         Coordinate and collaborate with existing programs within Champaign County and other county and state food policy organizations regionally;

·         Bring to the attention of the County Board new programs;

·         Identify and recommend to the County Board policy initiatives to support the goals and objectives of the Local Foods Policy Council;

·         Establish a web site presence on the Champaign County web site;

 

WHEREAS, the Champaign County Board has established that the Local Foods Policy Council shall be comprised of nine members appointed by the County Board Chair with the advice and consent of the County Board, each board member to be appointed to a 2-year term, and to include membership as follows:

·         Two members chosen from communities within the County;

·         Two members from local foods representatives;

·         Two members from academic institutions;

·         Two members from business/enterprise end users of local foods;

·         One member from the Champaign County Farm Bureau;

 

WHEREAS, the Champaign County Board has determined that the Local Foods Policy Council established herein shall end in March 2014, at which time the County Board shall review and assess the continuing need for the Local Foods Policy Council as constituted herein;

 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Champaign County Board that the establishment of a Champaign County Local Foods Policy Council is consistent with the Champaign County Economic Development Plan as documented in Resolution No. 4872; and

 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED by the Champaign County Board that it approves the establishment of a Local Foods Policy Council to achieve the following stated purposes:

·         Enhance economic development and strengthen local food systems within the County;

·         Bring stakeholders together and provide mechanisms for seeking stakeholder advice and expertise;

·         Explore means for small business loans;

·         Coordinate and collaborate with existing programs within Champaign County and other county and state food policy organizations regionally;

·         Bring to the attention of the County Board new programs;

·         Identify and recommend to the County Board policy initiatives to support the goals and objectives of the Local Foods Policy Council;

·         Establish a web site presence on the Champaign County web site;

 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED by the Champaign County Board that the Local Foods Policy Council shall be comprised of nine members appointed by the County Board Chair with the advice and consent of the County Board, each member to be appointed to a 2-year term, and to include membership as follows:

·         Two members chosen from communities within the County;

·         Two members from local foods representatives;

·         Two members from academic institutions;

·         Two members from business/enterprise end users of local foods;

·         One member from the Champaign County Farm Bureau;

 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED by the Champaign County Board that the Local Foods Policy Council established herein shall end in March 2014, at which time the County Board shall review and assess the continuing need for the Local Foods Policy Council as constituted herein.

 

 

 

 

 

PRESENTED, ADOPTED, APPROVED and RECORDED this 22nd day of March, A.D. 2012.

 

 

 

                                                                        ____________________________________

                                                                        C. Pius Weibel, Chair

                                                                        Champaign County Board

ATTEST:

 

 

 

_____________________________________ 

Gordy Hulten, Champaign County Clerk and

Ex Officio Clerk of the County Board




Below is a draft policy concerning local foods within Champaign County. I have shared this with fellow county board members along with city council members in Champaign and Urbana, the Champaign County Farm Bureau, and the many people locally so involved in this issue. The purpose for doing so is to elicit comments/suggestions about the draft that can be integrated into a final one to present to the county board policy committee in February. Please feel free to send me comments.


DRAFT III

(This draft edition contains no major changes, just minor adjustments based on comments that I have received as of 13 February. If there are other comments received before 14 Feb., I will try to integrate them.)

13 February 2012

To:  Carol Ammons, County Board Policy Chair

From:  Pattsi Petrie

Re:  Establishing a Champaign County Local Food Policy Council

 

Caveat: This is a draft that is being shared with fellow county board members along with other community decision makers and people involved in the production and use of local foods. The request to all of these individuals is to share comments and thoughts with me @  pattsi2@gmail.com   These will be considered and integrated into a final draft to be on the February County Board policy agenda.

 

Historic Background Pertaining to Local Foods and Policy:

Across the country various counties and organizations have been creating alliances and collaborations to enhance the expansion of the production and use of local foods for a number of reasons. Some of these are economic development; encourage the establishment of small businesses; better and fresher food available locally; encouragement of larger institutional entities to commit to the use of 10% of local food to support the growth, the economy, and as a health issue; efficient use of land; preservation and conservation of agriculture; reduction in food transportation; and as an educational resources for the local population. Actually, this is not a new concept for Champaign County. County board member McGinty has mentioned that the idea has been presented to him by several individuals interested in the issue of expanding local food production.

As a reminder, the county board has an economic development policy that contains as one of the goals:

Diversification, Business/Agriculture
Goal ED-4: Preserve the strength of agriculture and agritourism, and the existing business base,
while diversifying the local economy.
Objectives:
ED-4.1. Promote the growth of agriculture and agritourism that is both sustainable and profitable
ED-4.2: Encourage development of enterprises that add value to local agricultural production
ED-4.3: Encourage development of appropriate non-farm enterprises that augment income for
farm families.

Here is the url if you would like to reference the policy  
http://www.co.champaign.il.us/COUNTYBD/EconomicDevelopmentPolicy.pdf

Based on economic information, local food production farms, such as Prairie Fruit Farm and Blue Moon, yield a higher return rate per acre than farms producing row crops. Further, it takes much less infrastructure cost for the county to support agriculture than other forms of development, which is rarely taken into the cost consideration of converting agriculture land to other uses.

At the end of this memo are references to various organizations within Illinois and surrounding Midwest states along with information about North Carolina are included to give a broader perspective as to what other communities and counties are pursuing to enlarge the opportunities for local food as a means of economic development. Also included, as a resource, is the 2009 press release that “Governor Patrick Quinn signed landmark legislation that will put the state on the road to a vastly expanded supply of Illinois-grown food for Illinois tables.”

 

Purpose of Local Food Policy Council

·         Enhance economic development and strengthen local food systems within the county, per the county board policy reference above;

·         Bring stakeholders together and provide mechanisms for seeking stakeholder advice and expertise;

·         Explore means for small business loans;

·         Coordinate and collaborate with existing programs within Champaign County and other county and state food policy organizations regionally;

·         Bring to the attention of the county board new programs;

·         Address policy barriers and bring these to the attention of the county board;

·         Collaborate to establish and broaden community outreach;

·         Council function is designed to be on a macro level;

·         Establish a web site presence on the county web site.

 

Structure of the Council

·         Council will have nine members chosen by the board chair and confirmed by the whole county board. Two members will be chosen from communities within the county; two from local foods representatives—growers, marketers, Land Connection, as examples; two from academic institutions—extension, UIUC student farm, ACES, NRES, Urban Planning, as examples, two from end users of local foods, such as restaurants, institutions, county nursing home, etc. and one from the Champaign County Farm Bureau, if possible.

·         Council will develop a statement of purpose, by-laws, goals, objectives, and basic timeline for the first two years after appointed. The council will determine a meeting schedule subject to the Illinois Open Meetings Act.

·         Sunset clause—24 months from appointment. Purpose is to revisit the structure to determine if this still is appropriate or if so much progress has ensued a different structure would prove more fruitful. The council can bring forth this assessment to the county board.

·         Term limits—Initial members will all serve two-year terms.  After two years, 4 of 9 members will serve single one-year terms and subsequent terms for all members will be two years in length.

Cost to the County to Establish this Council --Since there is no staff time involved for the first 24 months, there ought to be no cost.

References: Keep scrolling down the page because there are a lot of reference.

For release noon August 18, 2009

 

 

 

Governor Signs Legislation Putting Illinois on Track to Vastly Expanded Local Farm Economy

 

·        Legislation paves way for many new sources and uses of Illinois grown food for Illinois tables

 

·        Potential for $30 billion return to state through local farm, food, and jobs system

 

 

 

 

SPRINGFIELD, IL— Governor Patrick Quinn today signed landmark legislation that will put the state on the road to a vastly expanded supply of Illinois-grown food for Illinois tables.

 

During a ceremony held on the front lawn of the home of Department of Agriculture Director Tom Jennings located on the Illinois State Fairgrounds, Quinn said the legislation represents an important first step in a process that could ultimately bring as much as $30 billion a year to the state’s economy.

 

“Agriculture is a diverse, multi-billion dollar industry that employs nearly one-quarter of the state’s workforce.  Simply stated, agriculture is the largest industry in the state and vital to our economy,” said Quinn at the “Ag Day” event.  “Standing in sharp contrast is the fact that nearly 96 percent of the food eaten in Illinois is grown in other states or nations.  The legislation I signed today will stimulate the rapidly growing efforts across Illinois to grow food for local consumption.  As traditional Illinois farmers, local food organizations, and others respond to demand for locally-grown food, there will be an enormous amount of new economic activity in our agricultural sector and thousands of new jobs across the state.”

 

The new law is designed to greatly increase demand for locally grown food by starting the process of building a reliable market for local food at facilities and institutions, like public schools, that receive significant state support.  Also, the legislation establishes the Illinois Local Food, Farms, and Jobs Council, which will encourage farmers to grow food for local markets and facilitate the building of the systems needed to get it there.

 

The legislation caps almost two year’s effort by the Illinois Local and Organic Food and Farm Task Force to determine the potential for Illinois to grow and produce food for consumption within the state and in neighboring states.  A study released by the Task Force earlier this year, Local Food, Farms & Jobs: Growing the Illinois Economy, revealed that of the approximately $48 billion spent by Illinoisans on food each year, only a tiny fraction is grown in Illinois.  A set of straightforward measures to encourage Illinois farmers to grow food for local consumption, coupled with a system for processing and transporting the food to Illinois markets could bring an estimated $30 billion to the state’s economy each year.

 

“I believe economic development begins in the kitchen,” said Illinois Agriculture Director Tom Jennings.  “There is no question we can produce locally grown fruits, nuts, and vegetables.  We also have the processing and packaging capabilities right here in our own backyard.  Setting up a distribution system that moves items at reasonable cost from tree or vine to the table is the big challenge and this legislation is an important step toward realizing that goal.”

 

“This legislation is the first step in creating a fresh farm and food system in Illinois that will bring important benefits to every corner of our state,” said Julie Hamos (D-Evanston), lead sponsor of the bill in the House of Representatives.  “As Illinoisans meet the increased demand for fresh food grown within the state, every community’s economy will see the benefits.  New jobs will be created as the system to process and transport the food to local markets is developed.  Those who live in Illinois and in adjacent states will benefit from the increased supply of fresh, locally-produced food.”

 

Hamos said that one result of the expanded local food system will be the growth of rural communities through expanded numbers of small and mid-size farmers and larger numbers of people working in agriculture.

 

“The fact that all but a tiny percentage of the fruits, vegetables, and meats that Illinoisans eat are produced in other states or countries is an astonishing imbalance and presents us with an enormous opportunity,” said State Senate by Senator Jacqueline Collins (D-Chicago), Senate sponsor of the bill.  “This legislation is an important step forward that will enable farmers in the state to produce and sell fresh food in underserved communities.”

 

Key elements of the legislation include:

 

·         Formation of the Illinois Local Food, Farms, and Jobs Council, which will work with state agencies, Illinois businesses, organizations and citizens to build a fully functioning local farm and food system in the state.

 

·         Establishment of local food procurement goals for state agencies such as prisons and other places where the state provides food service to purchase 20 percent of their food locally by 2020.  State-funded institutions such as schools and mental health centers would have a goal of 10 percent by 2020.  The Council would work with the organizations and agencies to develop strategies for local purchasing.

 

·         Creation of a local food purchase preference for state-owned food buyers in which they could pay a premium of up to 10 percent above the lowest bid in order to purchase locally grown goods.

 

·         Implementation of a system for gathering baseline data about local food purchases that would be updated annually.

 

·         Development of a new Illinois label and certification program to support farmers and businesses who want to be part of an Illinois-based farm and food economy.

 

 

 

“This legislation opens the door to a vast expansion of the local farm and food networks in Illinois’ already world-renowned agricultural infrastructure.  It encourages Illinois farmers to respond directly to consumers’ demand for fresh, tasty, locally-produced foods, and shows how to do it,” said Wes Jarrell, chairman of the 32-member Task Force.”  Jarrell is Professor of Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Illinois, and a farmer himself.

Jarrell noted that food production in Illinois has become a year-round industry as farmers and others adopt techniques for growing food in the winter months as well as the traditional growing seasons.  “We don’t have to ship in all our fresh food from warm regions when the weather is cold,” he said, “and with a much greater diversity of cold-season fruits and vegetables, eating what's locally in season isn't nearly as boring as it used to be.”

Key findings from the task force report that led to the new legislation include:

 

·         The market for local food is growing. The number of farmers markets in Illinois grew from 97 in 1999 to 270 in 2008. The number of community-supported agriculture organizations, which allow consumers to “subscribe” to a variety of Illinois-grown food products throughout the season, grew from 14 to 68 in the past eight years.

 

·         Demand extends into wholesale markets.  Illinois colleges and universities, as well as corporate kitchens, schools, hospitals, prisons, restaurants, and grocery stores want to buy farm products from nearby sources.  Inadequate local food production and delivery channels pinch supply.  Illinois’ predominant farm and food systems is designed to serve distant markets, not link farm production with in-state markets.

 

·         Local food system development is a nationwide phenomenon.  Many states are taking steps to satisfy consumer demand to know how food is produced, where, and by whom.  State government’s role is to help jumpstart job creation, lending, and investment in the local food system so that entrepreneurs can grow the economy.  By participating in this effort, Illinois is helping to create a new form of interstate commerce.

 

The legislation, HB3990: Illinois Food, Farms, and Jobs Act of 2009, the report of the Illinois Local and Organic Food and Farm Task Force, and other information is available at www.foodfarmsjobs.org.


2010 Council Report    http://foodfarmsjobs.org/reports/2010-report-of-the-to-the-illinois-general-assembly/

http://foodfarmsjobs.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/2009-task-force-report1.pdf

http://foodfarmsjobs.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/7_PrioritiesILFFJC_logics.pdf

http://foodfarmsjobs.org/resources/local-food-policy-guidelines/

 

###

 

Members of the Illinois Local and Organic Food and Farm Task Force

http://www.agr.state.il.us/marketing/ILOFFTaskForce/TFMembers-Contact.pdf


Contacts:

 

·         Debbie Hillman,task force co-coordinator 847/328-7175 DLHILLMAN@sbcglobal.net

·         Jim Braun, task force co-coordinator  (cell) 515-229-2679 jbraun2525@yahoo.com

 

EXAMPLE OF LOCAL CHURCH HELPING TO ELIMINATE HUNGER IN EAST CENTRAL ILLNOIS THROUGH LOCAL FOODS

http://www.news-gazette.com/news/agriculture/2012-03-18/churchs-latest-endeavor-help-feed-hungry-east-central-illinois.html


Here is a link to a food policy council developing in Springfield.

List of Illinois and Iowa Food Policy Councils from the
North American Food Policy Council

  • An S in front of a council name designates a state-level council;
  • An R designates a regional-level council;
  • A C designates a county-level council;
  • An L designates a local-level council, including city.

Illinois

S: Illinois Food, Farms, & Job Council

Contact: Jim Braun (Interim Coordinator)
Phone:
(515) 229-2679

Web: www.foodfarmjobs.org

S: Tri-State Food Policy Council (IL, IA, MO)

Contact: Brenda E. Derrick, Unit Educator, Nutrition and Wellness
Email:
derrickb@illinois.edu
Phone:
(217) 223-8380

Web: web.extension.illinois.edu/adamsbrown/localgrown/430.html

L: Chicago Food Policy Advisory Council

Contact: Erika Allen, Growing Power Illinois (co-chair)
Email:
erika@growingpower.org
Phone:
(773) 324-7924

Contact: Rodger Cooley (co-chair)
Email:
jrojet@yahoo.com

Web: www.chicagofoodpolicy.org

L: Evanston Food Policy Council (Evanston)

Contact: Debbie Hillman
Email:
DLHillman@sbcglobal.net
Phone:
(847) 328-7175

Web: www.thetalkingfarm.org

L: Food Initiatives Group (Macomb)

Contact: info@macombfig.org

Web: www.macombfig.org/blog

R: Heartland Local Food Network (Bloomington-Normal)

Contact: Marsha Veninga
Email:
marsha.veninga@hlfn.org
Phone:
(309) 530-0430

Web: www.hlfn.org

C: Northwest Local Foods Task Force (Stephenson County)

Contact: Margaret Larson
Email:
mklarson@uiuc.edu
Phone:
(815) 235-4125

C: Springfield Local Food Task Force (Springfield)

Contact: Lindsay Record, Illinois Stewardship Alliance
Email:
lindsay@ilstewards.org
Phone:
(217) 528-1563

Indiana

Iowa

S: Iowa Food Systems Council

Contact: Angie Tagtow
Email:
angie.tagtow@mac.com

Contact: Susan Roberts, JD, MS, RD - Roberts Law Firm, PLC
Email:
susan@susan-roberts.net
Phone:
(515) 965-3859

Web: www.iowafoodsystemscouncil.org

S: Tri-State Food Policy Council (IL, IA, MO)

Contact: Brenda E. Derrick, Unit Educator, Nutrition and Wellness
Email:
derrickb@illinois.edu
Phone:
(217) 223-8380

Web: web.extension.illinois.edu/adamsbrown/localgrown/430.html

C: Cass County Local Food Policy Council (Oakland)

Contact: Bahia Barry, Local Food Coordinator, Golden Hills RC&D
Southwest Iowa Food and Farm Initiative, 712 S. HWY 6, PO Box 189, Oakland, IA 51560
Phone:
(712) 482-3029

Web: www.swiffi.org

C: Pottawattamie County Local Food Council

Contact: Bahia Barry, Local Food Coordinator, Golden Hills RC&D--
Southwest Iowa Food and Farm Initiative, 712 S. HWY 6, PO Box 189, Oakland, IA 51560
Phone:
(712) 482-3029

Web: www.swiffi.org

North Carolina

North Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program

http://www.sustainable-ag.ncsu.edu/

USDA Resource

http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/agnic/susagorgs.shtml

NACO Resource

Counties and Local Food Systems    http://www.farmtoschool.org/files/publications_133.pdf



Viktor Schrader and Joseph Lauchlan. Local Food Systems in Central Illinois: An Economic Impact Analysis. July 2009. Department of Economics and the Stevenson Center for Community and Economic Development, Illinois State University. (I have a copy of this paper that I am willing to share.)

Ken Meter. Sangamon Region (Illinois) Local Farm & Food Economy: Highlights of a data compilation. 25 March 2010. Illinois Stewardship Alliance.





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