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Taylor - Oil Affects Louisiana as a Whole

 Thank you for viewing my presentation. Here's what I would like to know from you: What is your greatest concern about the impact of the oil spill on a state, county/parish, or person?

To respond to my prompt and to submit any additional comments, questions or personal accounts related to my speech topic, please post in my discussion forum on the “Oil Spill Anniversary Conference” Facebook page. If you do not have a Facebook account, please e-mail me at speechstudentconference@gmail.com instead from your personal e-mail account. Please put my name in the e-mail title, so I’m sure to receive your message.

On Thursday, April 21, 2011, at
9:00–10:15 a.m., I will be online to interact with you live via Facebook or e-mail depending on what works best for you. I’m looking forward to communicating with you at that time. Thank you!

- Taylor

Informative Speech, Final Draft, 4/13/11

(1) Taylor Blackwell

(2) Gulf Coast Oil Spill affects Louisiana as a whole

(3) To inform

(4) As a result of my presentation, my audience will be able to describe the devastation that the Gulf Coast oil spill had on our neighbors' coastline. My audience will hear about how the coastline of Louisiana was affected, Plaquemines Parish, and local fisherman Brad Robin

 

             INTRODUCTION

[pp cover slide]  Merriam-Webster defines a catastrophe as a violent and sudden change in a feature of the earth. This summer we witnessed the devastation that the oil spill brought to our shores and the others around us. [pic of coast] No location was hit harder than the Louisiana coast line. The oil spill plagued Louisiana's fishing industry, their tourism, and the employment of thousands.  Everyone in one way or another was affected by the oil spill. The effects were not drastic for all of us but there were some that were hit hard. How many of you love seafood?  Louisiana supplies the US with a third of its seafood, so this catastrophe could potentially destroy our local seafood. Can you imagine how those in Louisiana were affected?   Many of my loved ones were affected by the oil spill. My Cajun family being fishermen were placed in a terrible situation, which threatened their very livelihood. By the end of my speech I hope that you will be able to walk away and share with your friends how Louisiana was affected by the Gulf Coast oil spill; from the coast line as a region, to a local fishing community, and the personal story of Brad Robin.

BODY

I. Louisiana Coast Line affected

            A. Pre oil spill

            [pic of hurricane]

1.      Hurricane

 Louisiana has been plagued with bad luck for the past few years. They just started to gain back the tourists that were lost due to Hurricane Katrina and then the oil spill hit.

2.      Tourism

Tourism levels were supposed to return to normal after 2011 according to the Louisiana Tourism Forecast, prepared by the Louisiana Department of Culture. The Louisiana Tourism Forecast showed positive gains in tourism revenue since Hurricane Katrina. The projected dollar amount for tourism in 2010 was $8.7 billion, $2.37 billion from business visitors and $6.33 billion from leisure visitors. The Louisiana Department of Culture estimated that the state would have around 24.7 million visitors, but after the oil spill hit the state was estimated to have 300,000-400,000 visitors according to Ed Anderson of nola.com. The projected numbers for business visitors in 2011 was 6.4 million but jumped to 6.8 million, but the leisure visitors dropped from 18.3 million to 17.6 million.

            B. Post oil spill

            Louisiana was starting to make strides towards improvement and then the oil spill claimed all their efforts. I am going to start off a month after the oil spill took place.

[pic of oil

On May 11 Governor Bobby Jindall implemented a plan to build 100 miles of sand booms which were designed to protect 4000 miles of coastline. NOAA denied the request giving a plethora of excuses: too expensive, will take too long, and many others.  In late May, Louisiana governor Bobby Jindall said that 65 miles of the coast had already been hit, according to Stephanie Pappas of msnbc.com. As of June 14, 2010 approximately 12,000 people from Louisiana had filed for unemployment. Louisiana has a $3 billion dollar fishing industry; and supplies the United States with a third of its seafood. After the oil spill the estimated numbers for the tourism industry were refigured, the total revenue was $8.55 billion. The business section increased by $123 million to $2.49 billion and the leisure section dropped by $266 million to $6.06 billion, according to Ed Anderson of nola.com.

Now that we have covered how Louisiana was affected as a region, we are going to talk about a smaller section of Louisiana that was affected.

 

II. Plaquemines Parish before and after

      [pic of oil]

      A. Pre oil spill

 Had 15,000 residents before the spill, but now resides 3,500.  Nearly 700 families were still living in FEMA trailers in late August of 2010, according to Michelle Miller of CBS.

      B. After oil spill

             126,827 gallons of oil/water mixture were cleaned up from early September to mid October, according to nola.com. Shoreline crews picked up 18,000 bags of waste from September to mid October according to Plaquemines Parish president Billy Nungesser. [pic of fish] There were massive amounts of fished killed in parish waters whose deaths were related to the oil spill.

            Now that we have covered how an area was affected we are now going to go over how an individual was affected.

III. Personal story of Brad Robin

      [pic of Brad]A. Brad Robin

  A 6th generation oyster farmer from St. Bernard Parish. These fishermen’s livelihoods depend mainly on the well- being of the water around them. In November Brad reported that 75% of his family's 10,000 acres of oyster beds were destroyed by the oil spill and a strange fungus was starting to grow an the other half. He had to lay off 50 of his workers. It will take 3-5 years to get it back to what it was when the oil first hit.  Said it will take 10 years to get it back to normal. Will cost $500 an acre to get a certified biologist to assess the damages.

                  CONCLUSION

            Today we touched on how our fellow neighbors were affected by the oil spill. We learned about how Louisiana as a region was affected, and then we covered how Plaquemines parish was affected, and then we talked about how local fisherman Brad Robin was traumatized by the oil spill. This catastrophe has shown us that an entire region can be turned upside down by a single incident. Louisiana has coped well with the blow that they were handed. We need to continue

REFERENCES

Anderson, E. (2011, January 23). Leisure tourism in louisiana is expected to take a hit after bp oil spill. Retrieved from http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2011/01/leisure_tourism_in_louisiana_i.html

Blackwell, R. J. Personal communication. February 18, 2010.

Gerstein, J. (2010, June 14). The gulf of mexico oil spill by the numbers . Retrieved from http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/gulf-of-mexico-oil-spill-facts

Jervis, R. (2010, November 23). Oyster producers face deadline on bp compensation. Retrieved from http://floridatoday.gns.gannettonline.com/article/20101123/OILSPILLSTORIES/11220302/-1/oilspill

McCormack, F. (2010, October 5). New oyster advisory committee to plot industry recovery from oil spill . Retrieved from http://plaqueminesgazette.com/?p=385

Miller, M. (2010, August 29). Plaquemines parish struggles years after katrina. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/08/29/eveningnews/main6817475.shtml

Pappas, S. (2010, July 2). Gulf oil spill update: just the facts. Retrieved from http://www.livescience.com/6677-gulf-oil-spill-update-facts.html

Picayune, The Times. (2010, October 20). Plaquemines parish continues mopping up from bp oil spill in gulf of mexico. Retrieved from http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/10/plaquemines_parish_continues_m.html

Rodriguez, M. (2010, September 15). Massive la. fishkill prompts oil spill questions. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/15/national/main6868602.shtml

 

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