OIA Cross Country Hawaii Last Updated on 2/2/15




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Welcome to OIA Cross Country Hawaii
 
Our mission is to provide coaches the most up to date
 
information on the 2014 OIA Cross Country Season
 
Contact us at: menehunetrack@gmail.com 

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What's New:
 
 
Current Info & Reminders:
 
Up Coming Cross Country Meet Schedule

Up Coming OIA Events:

  • OIA Golf Tournament TBA
  • OIA Foundation Dinner: TBD
  • HIADA Conference: June 7‐10, 2015
  • AD Workshop: June 15-16, 2015
  • OIA Coaches Banquet June 17, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 

NEWS RELEASE

 

Prohibition of Jewelry Lifted in High School Track and Field

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                   Contact: Becky Oakes

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (July 14, 2014) — Effective with the 2015 high school track and field season, the prohibition of jewelry will be eliminated. This was one of several rules changes recommended by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Track and Field Rules Committee at its June 16-18 meeting in Indianapolis. The committee’s recommendations were subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors.

Becky Oakes, NFHS director of sports and liaison to the Track and Field Rules Committee, said the committee determined that prohibiting jewelry in high school track and field and cross country is not necessary.

“The wearing of jewelry ordinarily presents little risk of injury to either the competitor or opponents,” Oakes said. “Elimination of the rule allows officials to focus on meet administration directly related to actual competition. Coaches continue to have the obligation to see that competitors are properly equipped.”

In other changes, language regarding the time limit to initiate a trial in the throwing and jumping events was revised. Previously, competitors in these events had to initiate a trial and carry it to completion within one minute. Beginning next year, participants must only initiate the trial within the one-minute time limit. Completion of the event will be allowed beyond the prescribed time.

Another change was made in field events involving implements. In events such as the shot put, discus, javelin and pole vault, an additional trial will be allowed when an implement breaks – and thus becomes illegal – during competition due to no fault of the competitor.

The revised note in Rules 6-2-17 and 7-2-17reads as follows: “If a legal implement breaks during an attempt in accordance with the rules, no penalty shall be counted against the competitor and a replacement trial shall be awarded. If the implement breaks upon completion of the trial, a replacement attempt shall not be awarded and the results of the trial shall be recorded, provided it was made in accordance with the rules.”

In the discus throw, it no longer will be a foul if a competitor is out of control when exiting the back half of the circle. Also, in the discus, shot put and javelin, the requirement for the judge to call “mark” was eliminated.

Another change involves the high jump and pole vault events. A new article in Rule 7-2 will state that “a crossbar displaced by a force disassociated with the competitor after he/she is legally and clearly over the crossbar shall not be a fault and is considered a successful attempt.”

In Rule 8 involving special events, the committee approved the 1,500-meter run as an alternate for the 1,600-meter run in the decathlon and pentathlon. Oakes said when using the IAAF standard scoring, the 1,500-meter run is the standard distance. In addition, the indoor weight throw was approved for the listing of special events.

The final change involves Rule 1-4 on indoor track. Since many indoor meets are held in college facilities, the committee approved the 60-meter high hurdles and dash as alternates for the 55-meter high hurdles and dash. Oakes said this option eliminates special marking of the facilities for the hurdles and dash.

Track and field is the second-most popular sport for boys with 580,672 participants in 16,001 schools and is the No. 1 sport for girls with 472,939 participants in 15,962 schools during the 2012-13 season, according to the NFHS Athletics Participation Survey.

 

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About the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS)

The NFHS, based in Indianapolis, Indiana, is the national leadership organization for high school sports and performing arts activities. Since 1920, the NFHS has led the development of education-based interscholastic sports and performing arts activities that help students succeed in their lives. The NFHS sets direction for the future by building awareness and support, improving the participation experience, establishing consistent standards and rules for competition, and helping those who oversee high school sports and activities. The NFHS writes playing rules for 16 sports for boys and girls at the high school level. Through its 50 member state associations and the District of Columbia, the NFHS reaches more than 19,000 high schools and 11 million participants in high school activity programs, including more than 7.7 million in high school sports. As the recognized national authority on interscholastic activity programs, the NFHS conducts national meetings; sanctions interstate events; offers online publications and services for high school coaches and officials; sponsors professional organizations for high school coaches, officials, speech and debate coaches, and music adjudicators; serves as the national source for interscholastic coach training; and serves as a national information resource of interscholastic athletics and activities. For more information, visit the NFHS Web site atwww.nfhs.org.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:                 Bruce Howard, 317-972-6900

                                                 Director of Publications and Communications

                                                 National Federation of State High School Associations

                                                 bhoward@nfhs.org

 

                                                 Chris Boone, 317-972-6900

                                                 Assistant Director of Publications and Communications

                                                 National Federation of State High School Associations

                                                 cboone@nfhs.org

 

 

 

Bruce Howard

Director of Publications and Communications

National Federation of State High School Associations

PO Box 690

Indianapolis, IN 46206

317-822-5724

317-822-5700 (Fax)

bhoward@nfhs.org

 

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Free Online Course – The Role of the Parent in Sports – Now Available

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
Contact: Tim Flannery

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (October 19, 2010) — A new online education course – The Role of the Parent in Sports – is now available through the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) at www.nfhslearn.com.

Similar to the Concussion in Sports – What You Need to Know online course released in May, the new parent course is being offered at no cost. Anyone can register for the free course at www.nfhslearn.com

“Parents of students who participate in athletics make a huge difference in the quality of the sport experience for their sons and daughters,” said Tim Flannery, NFHS assistant director who directs the NFHS Coach Education Program. “Parents unintentionally spoil the educational experience of their children at times by the way they talk to them after games, behave in the stands and interact with coaches and officials. This online course provides information and resources to help parents understand their role in ensuring an educational experience for their son or daughter.” 

The NFHS Coach Education Program was started in 2007, and more than 140,000 coaches have taken the core course — Fundamentals of Coaching. Forty-five of the 51 NFHS member associations have adopted the course.

In addition to the core courses (Fundamentals of Coaching and NFHS First Aid for Coaches), eight sport-specific courses are available in football, basketball, soccer, softball, cheer and dance, spirit safety, wrestling and volleyball. The program also includes four elective courses and the two free courses.

The NFHS offers coaches the ability to become Level 1 certified as an Accredited Interscholastic Coach. In addition to the Fundamentals of Coaching course, coaches must complete NFHS First Aid for Coaches, or its equivalent, and one of the sport-specific courses or Teaching Sport Skills, and then can apply for certification online.

All NFHS coach education courses are available at www.nfhslearn.com

# # #

About the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS)
The NFHS, based in Indianapolis, Indiana, is the national leadership organization for high school sports and fine arts activities. Since 1920, the NFHS has led the development of education-based interscholastic sports and fine arts activities that help students succeed in their lives. The NFHS sets direction for the future by building awareness and support, improving the participation experience, establishing consistent standards and rules for competition, and helping those who oversee high school sports and activities. The NFHS writes playing rules for 17 sports for boys and girls at the high school level. Through its 50 member state associations and the District of Columbia, the NFHS reaches more than 19,000 high schools and 11 million participants in high school activity programs, including more than 7.6 million in high school sports. As the recognized national authority on interscholastic activity programs, the NFHS conducts national meetings; sanctions interstate events; produces publications for high school coaches, officials and athletic directors; sponsors professional organizations for high school coaches, officials, spirit coaches, speech and debate coaches and music adjudicators; and serves as a national information resource of interscholastic athletics and activities. For more information, visit the NFHS Web site at www.nfhs.org


MEDIA CONTACTS: 
    Bruce Howard or John Gillis, 317-972-6900
    National Federation of State High School Associations
    PO Box 690, Indianapolis, Indiana 46206
    bhoward@nfhs.org or jgillis@nfhs.org 


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Earl Kishimoto,
Oct 26, 2014, 1:47 PM
ĉ
Earl Kishimoto,
Oct 26, 2014, 1:47 PM
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