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Assignment Prompts

Peer Review Guidelines

posted Feb 26, 2013, 2:05 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo

Peer Review

Choose two other students’ drafts (preferably students who have not yet had their draft reviewed) to read and reply to as a peer reviewer. Answer all the questions listed below for each of the drafts. Be sure to comment on both content and surface features. If you only say ‘this is great’ or comment on commas and spelling, you will NOT get full credit. If it is a really good draft, try to break down how and why it is good. Make sure both your and the author can repeat the characteristics of “good” in future papers.

Complete these first three questions as an audio file using SoundCloud. Make sure your SoundCloud file is "public" and post a link to it for your classmate to hear. 
  1. What did you like about the draft? How/why did you like it? How might the author build on that section?
  2. What sections are confusing to you? How/why? Ask your classmates questions that would help you to make sense of the section.
  3. Do you have any unanswered questions after you finished reading the draft? What are they?
Post the link to the SoundCloud file and the written response to the following questions as a "comment" to the page the draft is posted on. 

Peer Review Reflect

In your homework blog, write a reflection of your peer review process. First list and link to the two classmate’s drafts you reviewed. What did you learn from reading and replying to your classmates’ drafts? After reviewing their drafts, what do you realize you need to revise in your own draft? Now read the reviews conducted on your draft (please list the names of your classmate’s who reviewed your draft). Did any comments surprise you? Why or why not?

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by ilmungo

Major Project Revise & Resubmit Guidelines

posted Feb 6, 2013, 5:25 PM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Feb 14, 2013, 8:09 AM ]

If the instructor gives you the option to Revise and Resubmit a grade major project, you may submit a revised project before April 30th. To submit a revised major project, you must do the following:
  1. Revise the project based on the instructor's comments and suggestions. 
  2. Complete on of the Major Project Revision Options. You will need to submit your reflection from our Revision Option along with your revised project.
  3. Prepare an cover email for the instructor that includes a discussion of what changes you made and why you made them. You must explicitly talk about at least one revision you made that was not suggested by the instructor. 
When you are ready to resubmit the project, email the instructor the revised project along with all the information listed above. 

Major Project Revision Options

posted Feb 6, 2013, 4:40 PM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Feb 6, 2013, 4:50 PM ]

Re-Vision is actually “Re-seeing” or seeing again. We generally get too close to our own writing to clearly re-see it in a meaningful way. The following revision options will allow you to step back and re-see your paper through the eyes, or ears, of others. You will use these revision options in two ways:
  1. For every major project you complete in class, you will be required to complete one of the following revision options before final submission. The instructor will not grade your project if you have not also submitted the revision reflection associated with the option you choose.
  2. If you choose to revise a major project after the instructor has graded it, you will be required to complete one of the following revision options before submitting for a new grade. You will want to first revise your project, then do one of these revision options, and then revise it again prior to submission for regrading. The instructor will not regrade your project if you have not also submitted the revision reflection associated with the option you choose.
Your revision reflections should be at least two paragraphs in length. In the reflection you will want to talk about how the revision strategy prompted specific changes in your paper as well as whether or not the revision strategy worked for you and if you would try it again for future projects.

Option One: SoundCloud

Reading our work out loud allows us to “hear” things about our writing that we might otherwise be unable to “see” with our eyes. For this revision option, record yourself in SoundCloud as you read a double-spaced page of your paper out loud. Then, listen to your recording and use the following questions to help you reflect on what you hear. Make sure to jot down notes!
  • As you read your paper, did you immediately notice things in need of changing?
  • Are there any word choices that “sound” incorrect and need changing?
  • Does the tone of your voice reflect the content of the written paper?
  • Do you notice any grammar concerns?
  • Are there any sentence structures that “sound” awkward and need changing?
  • Are there any ideas that are unclear to you as you listen?
  • Do your ideas flow easily and transition smoothly?
  • What, if anything, surprised you as you listened to yourself read your own writing?
Now, write a reflection in which you discuss your responses to these questions (or other responses you had while listening). What revisions will you make as a result of this process? Make sure to post a link to your SoundCloud recording within the document.

Option Two: Writing Center

Make an appointment to work with a tutor in the writing center. When you go for your appointment, be sure to take both your draft of the assignment as well as the formal writing assignment prompt (which usually includes both the DIY section in the book as well as the course website assignment page). If you visit the Writing Center for your revision option, be sure to include the following information in your reflection:
  • date & time of the appointment;
  • name of the tutor;
  • general summary of what you discussed;
  • brief description of specific elements of your project you will change based on your tutoring session; and
  • brief description of the writing and revising strategies you and your tutor discussed; include ideas about whether or not you would use this strategy in future writing scenarios.

Option Three: Ask A Librarian

If you feel part of your revision process would benefit from help by a librarian, feel free to Ask-a-Librarian. Specifically, you should be in a space where you need help identifying new, different, or more resources to help construct your argument and/or refutation. Before meeting with a librarian, be sure to have the following information prepared:
  • specific ideas of what type of information you need and why you need it,
  • a description of what type of information you already have, how you found it, and how you are currently using it within your project. As a part of your reflection, you are also required to submit your preparation notes (addressing the two prompts above). 
Your reflection also needs to include the following information:
  • date, time, & location of the appointment;
  • name of the librarian;
  • general summary of what you discussed;
  • brief description of specific elements of your project you will change based on your session; and
  • brief description of the research strategies you and the librarian discussed; include ideas about whether or not you would use this strategy in future writing and research scenarios.

Option Four: Peer Review

Having another set of eyes reading your paper is always a good thing. To complete this revision option, have another individual who is not in one of your instructor’s sections of ENGL211:
  1. read the major project assignment prompt for your project and then 
  2. read through your revised paper to provide you with an additional perspective on how you can improve. 
This person could be a friend, a family member, or a peer from another class. The person who reads your paper should not correct your paper or rewrite any part for you. Provide your reviewer with the same peer review form we used in class: 
  • What did you like about the draft? Why?
  • Where were you confused? What questions do you have about why you are confused?
  • Where would you like to know more? What more would you like to know?
  • Does the draft complete everything requested in the assignment prompt? What is missing? What other content might be revised to better improve the document? 
If are doing peer review for your revision option, be sure to include the following information in your reflection:
  • date, time, and location of the working session;
  • name of the of the person who reviewed your draft;
  • general summary of what you discussed; and
  • brief description of specific elements of your project you will change based on your working session.

Option Five: Smarthinking 

Smarthinking is an online tutorial option for students at ODU. You can access Smarthinking by logging on to Blackboard and going to the ENGL211 Blackboard course shell. You may use any of the three writing tutoring options in Smarthinking:
  • Writing Center
  • Drop-In Tutoring 
  • Scheduled Tutoring
For a productive tutoring sessions, you probably want to have the assignment prompt available to share with the tutor (at least the course website portion of the prompt). If you use Smarthinking for your revision option, be sure to include the following information in your reflection:
  • writing tutoring option and why you chose that option;
  • date & time of the tutoring;
  • name of the tutor;
  • general summary of what you discussed;
  • brief description of specific elements of your project you will change based on your tutoring session; and
  • brief description of the writing and revising strategies you and your tutor discussed; include ideas about whether or not you would use this strategy in future writing scenarios.

Final Course Portfolio

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:57 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Apr 18, 2013, 12:55 PM ]

Due: Tuesday May 7, 12:30pm


Your final research assignment in this course asks you to synthesize all of the reading and writing you have done this term. Your goal is to reflect on how and why you have grown as a writer through the processes in this course. The focus of this assignment will be on your self-evaluation and reflection as a writer and learner.

You will want to evaluate yourself using the course competencies (pages 2-3) and your personal course goals as criteria. For each competency discuss

  • what you learned,
  • where your learning is demonstrated in the course,
    • cite at least one major writing project assignment per competency and goal,
    • cite at least one "smaller" homework assignment per competency and goal,
  • why and how you still need to grow in that area, and
  • how, when, where and why you might use this information or skill in the future.

Specifically, you are to demonstrate how well you have achieved the competencies of the course, using your own writing as evidence.

Features of a Course Portfolio

The primary audience for this project is the instructor, the class, and your future self. The secondary audience for this project is a panel of English teachers who will consider revising the course and/or curriculum for ENGL211 depending on this feedback from students. Your Portfolio is made up of three major components:

  • The Reflective Cover Letter,
  • Final Submissions of WP#1-#5 with Suggestions for Revision, and
  • All of the work in the class compiled in your Wiki site.

The Reflective Cover Letter

In this letter, you are to discuss your understanding of and progress with each of the course competencies and your course goals. Also identify which of two or three the competencies you feel especially good at, and which one or two you need continue working on. After discussing each of the competencies and goals, you should identify strategies for improvement to assure your continued growth as a college-level writer. The examples from your own writing should serve as evidence for the claims you make about your own progress this semester.

Your Reflective Cover Letter is basically a piece of source-based writing, much like a research paper that you might turn in for another class. The research you are conducting, however, is on your own writing and progress, and you are investigating how well you have done this semester and what you still want to work on. You are not required to use any outside sources for this project; your primary resource is your own experience and knowledge of yourself as a growing writer. However, you will want to discuss specific elements from the course as evidence to demonstrate your learning. Consider using the following as evidence of your learning:

  • Writing Projects,
  • Various Reflection Assignments, and
  • Other Homework.

The reflective cover letter should be approximately three pages in length (double-spaced), and should be in the form of a letter. While it doesn't need to be as formal as a piece of academic writing, you should still follow the conventions of standard English in terms of grammar, usage, and sentence structure. Also, you don't need to cite your sources, but you should refer to specific assignments when discussing your mastery of these outcomes (ideally link to them with hyperlinks).

Note: Please note, this is not a letter about the class or the instructor. It should evaluate your personal progress with the specific course outcomes.

WPs#1, 3-5 with Suggestions for Revision

You will be responsible for reposting the final versions of Writing Projects #1, #3, #4, and #5 in your blog forum. In the same posting (prior to the actual paper, or as the posting with the paper as an attachment), include a brief paragraph or two that outline two or three revisions you would make on this project if you were to submit it again. You may use suggestions that your classmates gave you while peer reviewing the project and/or suggestions the instructor gave you while grading the project. Your two or three suggestions need to include the following:

  • A detailed description of what you would revise;
  • A detailed description of why you would revise it; and
  • A connection to a specific course outcome that this revision is helping you achieve.

Do not only regurgitate what the instructor mentioned in your graded document.

Grading Criteria

To earn a passing grade (a C, 70-79 points) you must fulfill the minimum requirements of the project:

  • the reflective cover letter stays within the page limits: 2 to 4 pages.
  • the reflective cover letter makes a claim on how you have grown as a writer during this course.
  • the reflective cover letter discusses all the course outcomes:
    • what you learned,
    • where your learning is demonstrated in the course,
    • why and how you still need to grow in that area, and
    • how, when, where and why you might use this information or skill in the future.
  • WP#1, #3, #4, and #5 pages include newly posted two-three suggestions for revisions.
  • provide a clear organizational structure to the project.
  • check that sentences are complete with a subject and agreeing verb (no fragments or runon sentences).
  • check that there are properly capitalized words and end of sentence punctuation.
  • write in an intelligible manner (not have so many grammar, mechanics, etc. issues that make the meaning of the text incomprehensible).

To earn an above average grade (a B, 80-89 points) you will also need to:

  • the reflective cover letter provides evidence about your growth in each outcome category:
    • provide a variety of types of evidence (writing projects, reading reflections, homework, etc.).
    • make evidence relevant to the paragraph's main point and the project's overall claim.
    • provide detailed connection/description of how the evidence supports the point/reason/claim.
  • the reflective letter motivates the audience to read with an introduction that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • introduces the main topic and the purpose of the project.
    • makes the reader attentive and receptive to both the topic and the author.
    • grabs the reader's attention.
    • gives a brief history of the topic to justify its importance to the audience.
    • lists or outlines the sources used in the project.
  • the reflective letter wrap-ups the text in a conclusion that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • sum up your arguments.
    • associate the opposition with negative connotations.
    • arouse sympathy for the topic.
    • motive the audience to action.
  • the suggested revisions for WP#1, #3-#5 include
    • a detailed description of what you would revise;
    • a detailed description of why you would revise it; and
    • a connection to a specific course outcome that this revision is helping you achieve.
  • focus each paragraph with a single clear organizing point and discuss details, examples, and evidence that support the point.
  • provide a variety of sentence styles and lengths.
  • make sentences are tight and concise (no redundant or awkward words or phrases).
  • check that there are no pronouns with unclear referents.
  • use words correctly and consistently in their meanings.
  • follow the submission policies:
    • double-space your document, provide one-inch margins.
    • include your name, the date, the class section #, the assignment name, and your project title at the top of the document.
    • use a standard, 12-point font (such as Times New Roman).
    • follow APA guidelines as for in-text citations.
    • follow APA guidelines as for reference list (bibliographic citations) at the end of the letter.

To earn an excellent grade (an A, 90-100 pts) you will also need to demonstrate careful attention to your writing arrangement, style and tone:

  • make each paragraph clearly function as a part of the project's argument.
  • provide clear transitions between the paragraphs above and below that show how each paragraph's main points are related to one another.
  • make sentences clearly flow from one to another, occasionally using transitional words and phrases.
  • make sentences sound crisp and flow smoothly (when read aloud, sentences sound appealing).
  • check for no spelling or typographical errors.
  • check that there are no dangling or misplaced modifiers.
  • make sure commas are used to help the syntax and meaning of the sentence.

You can not earn a B or an A without also completing all the requirements in the earlier grade groupings.

Project #5: Research Argument

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:56 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Apr 4, 2013, 5:59 AM ]

The assignment prompt for this assignment comes in three parts:

  • DIY: Writing a Research Proposal (after chapter 3 in the textbook)
  • Project #5: Revised Research Proposal Assignment Prompt (this page)
  • P#5 Grading Criteria/Rubric (below)
Don't forget, this assignment has three parts:
  • 4/23 before class: Complete Draft of P#5
  • 4/25 in class: Peer Review at least two of your classmate's drafts
  • 4/30 before class: Final of P#5

Project #5: Research Argument

Purpose

This is what all of your work for the semester has lead up to, you are now prepared to answer your research question.  

Audience

At this point you have identified your own appropriate audience for project #5. You will want to be sure to provide a detailed analysis of the audience in the cover memo so that your peer reviewers and instructor know what/how/why you are writing in a particular manner. 

Content Requirements

Most likely your primary and secondary research has demonstrated that the answer is not 100% clear and you need to justify an appropriate answer for an appropriate context. You will need to use the information you gathered in your primary and secondary research as evidence within your answer.

Submission Guidelines

In this project you get the most freedom in genre, media, format, and style. You need to select what type of document you need to produce that is most appropriate for your purpose and audience. In short, you need to compose something that answers your research question and presents the answers as an "argument" (with a thesis, reasons, and evidence). Therefore, the "weight" or "depth" of your project needs to be the equivalent of a 8-12 page research paper. Based on your purpose and audience, you may decide a smaller text is more appropriate (like a 3 fold pamphlet or a 15 second commercial/video spot (you can easily post this to YouTube and embed it in your wiki)); however, to meet the "weight" and "depth" requirements you would need to also make a website (using something like Google Sites) that provides the more detailed argument. In other words, your pamphlet and/or video would send your audience to read more at the website. Feel free to email your instructor immediately to start dialoguing about what type of genre and/or media you might use to complete WP#5.
At minimum, your project will need to include:
  • at least one "text" that makes an argument that answers your original research question (you maybe have layered texts like the example above),
  • a reference/works cited page,
  • a cover memo that discusses what you did, why, how, etc. 
The Cover Memo needs to be in Memo Format and include the following information:
  • Description of what the text is and where the peer reviewers and/or instructor can find it. 
  • (Draft: In your draft cover memo include specific section asking for specific types of feedback from your peer reviewers.)
  • Identification of the Purpose of this Document/Text/Project.
    • Analysis of the genre and media used in the text meets the needs of the rhetorical purpose.
    • Analysis of how at least two different sections within your document/text/project specifically address the purpose.
  • Identification of both the primary and secondary Audiences of this Document/Text/Project. Analysis of the specific wants and needs of the audiences. 
    • Analysis of the genre and media used in the text meets the needs of the rhetorical audiences.
    • Analysis of how at least two different sections within your document/text/project specifically address the wants and needs of the primary audience. 
  • What were the steps you took to complete this project? How might you change your process if you were to complete the project again? What steps do you think you will take for your next project?
  • What are you most proud of in this project? Why are you proud? What are you most concerned with in this project? How did you try to address that concern before finally submitting your project? If you had more time, how might you further work on that concern?
  • In terms of learning about composing, what did you specifically work on to improve during this project? Do you feel you succeeded in improving your composing processes or skills? What composing processes or skills will you work on during your next project?
  • What course outcomes did you work towards during this project? Do you feel you achieved them? How do you know? What evidence does either your process or product for this current writing provide towards demonstrating your achievement of a course outcome? What outcomes do you think you will work on in your next project?

Grading Criteria

To earn a passing grade (a C, 70-79 points) you must fulfill the minimum requirements of the essay:
_____ appropriately select your genre and media based on the rhetorical needs of your purpose and audience (discuss in the memo).
_____ address a specific audience without saying “my audience is…”
_____ introduce, and possibly define, the focused issue you are exploring in this project. The issue should be reflected in the title and introduction.
_____ provide the answer to your research question in the form of a claim that you will argue and support with evidence.
_____ provide evidence to support the claim
_____ use at least five (5) outside sources.
_____ address alternative perspectives and counter-arguments, usually this is referred to as the rebuttal section
_____ provide a clear organizational structure to the project
_____ check that sentences are complete with a subject and agreeing verb (no fragments or run-on sentences).
_____ check that there are properly capitalized words and end of sentence punctuation.
_____ write in an intelligible manner (not have so many grammar, mechanics, etc. issues that make the meaning of the text incomprehensible)

To earn an above average grade (a B, 80-89 points) you will also need to:
_____ carefully adapt sections of your text to meet the rhetorical needs of your purpose and audience (discuss in the memo).
_____ develop a robust argument with well applied evidence
_____ provide a variety of “types” of evidence (statistics, testimony, facts, anecdotes, etc.)
_____ make evidence relevant to the paragraph’s main point and the project’s overall claim
_____ make evidence appropriate for the project’s topic, audience, and purpose?
_____ provide detailed connection/description of how the evidence supports the point/reason/claim
_____ provide evidence for the rebuttal argument
_____ evaluate evidence used by opposing parties
_____ motivate the audience to read with an introduction that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
_____ introduces the main topic and the purpose of the project.
_____ makes the reader attentive and receptive to both the topic and the author.
_____ grabs the reader’s attention.
_____ gives a brief history of the topic to justify its importance to the audience.
_____ lists or outlines the sources used in the project.
_____ wrap-up the text in a conclusion that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
_____ Sum up your arguments.
_____ Associate the opposition with negative connotations.
_____ Arouse sympathy for the topic.
_____ Motive the audience to action.
_____ focus each paragraph/section with a single clear organizing point and discuss details, examples, and evidence that support the point.
_____ provide a variety of sentence styles and lengths.
_____ make sentences are tight and concise (no redundant or awkward words or phrases).
_____ check that there are no pronouns with unclear referents.
_____ use words correctly and consistently in their meanings.
_____ follow the submission policies:
_____ follow audience, genre, and media appropriate guidelines as for in-text citations
_____ follow audience, genre, and media appropriate guidelines as for reference list (bibliographic citations) at the end of or connecte to the project
_____ follow memo format

To earn an excellent grade (an A, 90-100 pts) You will also need to demonstrate careful attention to your writing arrangement, style and tone:
_____ reflect on how/why you grew as a writer in while completing this project (discuss in the memo).
_____ discuss at least three course outcomes
_____ make each paragraph clearly function as a part of the project’s argument.
_____ provide clear transitions between the paragraphs above and below that show how each paragraph’s main points are related to one another.
_____ make sentences clearly flow from one to another, occasionally using transitional words and phrases.
_____ make sentences sound crisp and flow smoothly (when read aloud, sentences sound appealing).
_____ check for no spelling or typographical errors.
_____ check that there are no dangling or misplaced modifiers.
_____ make sure commas are used to help the syntax and meaning of the sentence.
You can not earn a B or an A without also completing all the requirements in the earlier grade groupings.

Project #4: Revised Research Proposal

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:55 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Apr 4, 2013, 5:58 AM ]

The assignment prompt for this assignment comes in three parts:

  • DIY: Writing a Research Proposal (after chapter 3 in the textbook)
  • Project #4: Revised Research Proposal Assignment Prompt (this page)
  • P#4 Grading Criteria/Rubric (below)

Don't forget, this assignment has three parts:

  • 4/9 before class: Complete Draft of P#4
  • 4/11 before class: Peer Review at least two of your classmate's drafts
  • 4/16 before class: Final of P#4

Project #4: The Revised Research Proposal Assignment Prompt

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to receive permission to go ahead with your research project for the remainder of the course. You will need to convince the reader (your instructor), that the the research question that you have selected is important and worth your time and energy. You will also need to describe rhetorical context with an appropriate purpose, audience, and publication venue for project #5. Finally, you will need to describe your primary research method for answering the question.

Audience
Your intended audience is the instructor for this course. Therefore, you will want to construct the final document that provides evidence to support your point and is polished (without surface feature error). 

Content Requirements

  • Introduction to the subject of the proposal
  • Explanation of the significance of the project
    • Discussion of how/why the author's interest and experience with the topic
    • Description of future audience who is interested in the answer to your question
    • Review of current literature on the subject
  • Clear research question
  • Statement of objectives
  • Description of primary research methodology
    • Statement about the researcher's ability to complete the project
    • Timeline for the research project

Submission Guidelines

Since this is a traditional research proposal, you will submit it in a traditional essay format with your name, date, course information, etc., along with a title, at the beginning of the document. You will use one inch margins, 12 point font, and double spacing. Use the citation style that is appropriate for your topic and intended audience. 

Grading Criteria

To earn a passing grade (a C, 79-79 pts) you must fulfill the minimum requirements of the essay:

  • stay within the page limit: 8 to 15 pages.
  • provide an overview of what the issue is that you are interested in and why it is significant.
  • focus on a single research question (explicitly stating it within the proposal).
  • reflect on what your specific experience(s) is/are with the issue (be specific, include concrete details).
    • discuss your purpose is in researching and writing on the issue.
    • discuss your perspective and/or opinion on the issue is right now.
  • construct a rhetorical situation in which you will be researching and writing for Project 5 (where you answer the research questions);
    • the audience is appropriate to the research question (it is not your classmates).
    • the final product is appropriate for the audience and the purpose of providing the answer to the research question.
  • analyze the limitations, opportunities, and challenges of the particular project. 
  • provide a research plan that includes a discussion of resources and a timeline.
  • provide a clear organizational structure to the proposal.
  • write in a clear, easy-to-understand manner.
  • check that sentences are complete with a subject and agreeing verb (no fragments or run-on sentences).
  • check that there are properly capitalized words and end of sentence punctuation.
  • write in an intelligible manner (not have so many grammar, mechanics, etc. issues that make the meaning of the text incomprehensible).

To earn an above average grade (a B, 80-89 points) you will also need to:

  • provide a detailed overview of the issue as a review of literature.
    • incorporate at least six outside sources
    • discuss how and why the topic is controversial. 
  • provide a detailed analysis of your intended audience for Project #5
    • discuss why does your proposed audience care about this topic? Or why should they care?
    • analyze the specific wants and needs of your audience;
  • include detailed discussion of your primary research methodology
    • outline questions or prompts you will use to analyze your primary object of study
    • discuss elements related to your ability to complete the project
    • provide a detailed timeline for the research project
  • motivate the audience to read/listen with an introduction that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • introduces the main topic, research question, and the purpose of the project.
    • makes the reader attentive and receptive to both the topic and the author.
    • grabs the reader's attention.
    • gives a brief history of the topic to justify its importance to the audience.
    • lists or outlines the rest of the research proposal.
  • wrap-up the text in a conclusion that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • sums up your points about the purpose, audience, and you as the author.
    • sums up your points about the purpose, audience, and you as the author.
    • outlines your planned research process.
  • provide a variety of sentence styles and lengths.
  • make sentences are tight and concise (no redundant or awkward words or phrases).
  • check that there are no pronouns with unclear referents.
  • use words correctly and consistently in their meanings.
  • follow the submission policies:
    • double-space your document, provide one-inch margins
    • include your name, the date, the class section #, the assignment name, and your project title at the top of the document.
    • use a standard, 12-point font (such as Times New Roman).
    • follow appropriate citation guidelines as for in-text citations.
    • follow appropriate citation guidelines as for reference list (bibliographic citations) at the end of the project.

To earn an excellent grade (an A, 90-100 points) you will also need to demonstrate careful attention to your writing arrangement, style and tone:

  • make each paragraph clearly function as a part of the project's argument.
  • provide clear transitions between the paragraphs/ideas above and below that show how each paragraph's main points are related to one another.
  • make sentences clearly flow from one to another, occasionally using transitional words and phrases.
  • make sentences sound crisp and flow smoothly (when read aloud, sentences sound appealing).
  • check for no spelling or typographical errors.
  • check that there are no dangling or misplaced modifiers.
  • make sure commas are used to help the syntax and meaning of the sentence.

You cannot earn a B or an A without also completing all the requirements in the earlier grade groupings.

Project #3: Annotated Bibliography

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:54 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Mar 4, 2013, 11:52 AM ]

The assignment prompt for this assignment comes in three parts:

  • DIY: Writing a Review of Research (after chapter 7 in the textbook)
  • Project #3: Annotated Bibliography Assignment Prompt (this page)
  • P#3 Grading Criteria/Rubric (below)

Don't forget, this assignment has three parts:

  • 3/5 before class: Complete Draft of P#3
  • 3/7 Peer Review at least two of your classmate's drafts
  • 3/17: Final of P#3 

Project #3: Annotated Bibliography Assignment Prompt

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that you have started serious secondary research to help answer your research question. 

Audience
Your intended audience is the instructor for this course. Therefore, you will want to construct the final document that is well organized, includes all the requested information, and is polished (without surface feature error). 

Content Requirements

Your annotated bibliography will include both an introduction and conclusion.
  • Introduction: This should be re-introducing your research topic and question (especially if it has shifted a bit since you first started). You should also remind the reader of how/why this is an important and/or significant project. You should be able to revise materials from P#2 for the first paragraph of your introduction. A second paragraph should briefly discuss the methods you took to conduct your research. Where did you look for resources? What search terms did you use? etc. Also discuss which citation style you are using and how/why it is appropriate for your topic and/or intended audience. 
  • Conclusion: In the conclusion you should discuss where you are with the research project. Have you found any themes or major trends across the research? How did the different perspectives of different sources get you thinking about the topic in new ways? Have you found answers your research question? Do you still need to find more information? If so, what? When/how/where will you find it? 
Your annotated bibliography entries will include the following information:
  • Full bibliographic citation
  • Summary of the resource
  • Rhetorical context of the resource
  • Evaluation of the resource
  • Discussion of how/why the resource is relevant to your research question and/or intended audience
  • Discussion of how/why your resource is connected to other resources in the annotated bibliography
Submission Guidelines
Although this is working document to share with your instructor, it is still a major "project" in this course and should be submitted as a complete and polished work. 

Grading Criteria

To earn a passing grade (a C, 70-79 pts) you must fulfill the minimum requirements of the

essay:

  • introduce, and possibly define, the focused issue you are exploring in this project. The issue should be reflected in the title and introduction.
  • follow traditional annotated bibliography format (full bibliographic entry followed by detailed annotation in paragraph form).
  • annotate at least ten (10) different resources, 
    • at least five resources are found using the library databases.
    • at least three resources are scholarly, peer-reviewed journal articles or books.
  • cover a variety of perspectives through different resources included in the bibliography.
  • lay out the different positions and conjectures taken on the issues by various interested parties.
  • summarize each source
  • describe the perspective being conveyed in each source and provide brief analysis of how and why this group holds their beliefs;
  • evaluate each source:
    • how is the source relevant to the issue? Purpose? Audience?
    • what are the credentials and stance of author and publisher? How and why are the author and publisher invested in the source?
    • what other perspectives are acknowledged in the source? What is omitted in the source?
    • what is the date of publication? How timely and relevant is that to the topic?
    • what is the level of specialization of the source? How detailed of information is required for your purpose? Your audience?
    • who is the intended audience for the source? How do they relate to your purpose and audience? Is the source cited in other sources? How often is the source cross-referenced in your research?
    • how formally and effectively is the source designed? What effects do design, layout, and visuals have on the message?
  • provide a clear organizational structure to the project (usually alphabetical order unless you have groups with subject headers).
  • check that sentences are complete with a subject and agreeing verb (no fragments or run-on sentences).
  • check that there are properly capitalized words and end of sentence punctuation.
  • write in an intelligible manner (not have so many grammar, mechanics, etc. issues that make the meaning of the text incomprehensible)

To earn an above average grade (a B, 80-89 points) you will also need to:

  • discuss how and why the topic is controversial. Why does your proposed audience care about this topic? Or why should they care?
  • include  the following analysis in the annotations:
    • compare the source to other sources in the bibliography;
    • describe how you foresee yourself using the source in your final position paper (P#5)
    • analyze how and why this source allows you to better understand your purpose and audience for P#5.
  • motivate the audience to read with an introduction that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • introduces the main topic and the purpose of the project.
    • makes the reader attentive and receptive to both the topic and the author.
    • grabs the reader’s attention.
    • gives a brief history of the topic to justify its importance to the audience.
    • lists or outlines the sources used in the project.
  • wrap-up the text in a conclusion that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • sums up your research.
    • discusses what you learned. How have your ideas about the topic and research question changed?
    • discusses what you still need to research.
  • focus each paragraph with a single clear organizing point and discuss details, examples, and evidence that support the point.
  • provide a variety of sentence styles and lengths.
  • make sentences are tight and concise (no redundant or awkward words or phrases).
  • check that there are no pronouns with unclear referents.
  • use words correctly and consistently in their meanings.
  • follow the submission policies:
    • include your name, the date, the class section #, the assignment name, in the "List Info" section.
    • provide your project title at the top of the list.
    • follow appropriate guidelines as for in-text citations
    • follow appropriate guidelines as for reference list (bibliographic citations) at the end of the letter

To earn an excellent grade (an A, 90-100 points) you will also need to demonstrate careful attention to your writing arrangement, style and tone:

  • provide a title that is engaging and hooks the reader's attention.
  • introduce and justify the citation style you are using.
  • make each paragraph clearly function as a part of the project’s argument.
  • provide clear transitions between the paragraphs above and below that show how each paragraph’s main points are related to one another.
  • make sentences clearly flow from one to another, occasionally using transitional words and phrases.
  • make sentences sound crisp and flow smoothly (when read aloud, sentences sound appealing).
  • check for no spelling or typographical errors.
  • check that there are no dangling or misplaced modifiers.
  • make sure commas are used to help the syntax and meaning of the sentence.

You cannot earn a B or an A without also completing all the requirements in the earlier grade groupings.

Project #2: Research Project Proposal

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:54 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Mar 22, 2013, 4:54 PM ]

The assignment prompt for this assignment comes in three parts:

  • DIY: Writing a Research Proposal (after chapter 3 in the textbook)
  • Project #2: Research Project Proposal Assignment Prompt (this page)
  • P#2 Grading Criteria/Rubric (below)

Don't forget, this assignment has three parts:

  • 2/26 before class: Complete Draft of P#2
  • 2/26 in class: Peer Review at least two of your classmate's drafts
  • 2/28: Final of P#2 

Project #2: The Research Proposal Assignment Prompt

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to receive permission to go ahead with your research project for the remainder of the course. You will need to convince the reader (your instructor), that the the research question that you have selected is important and worth your time and energy. You will also need to describe a group of individuals who would be interested in the results of your research (they will be your audience for project #5). 

Audience
Your intended audience is the instructor for this course. Therefore, you will want to construct the final document that provides evidence to support your point and is polished (without surface feature error). 

Content Requirements

  • Introduction to the subject of the proposal
  • Explanation of the significance of the project
    • Discussion of how/why the author's interest and experience with the topic
    • Description of future audience who is interested in the answer to your question
  • Clear research question
  • Statement of objectives

Submission Guidelines

Since this is a traditional research proposal, you will submit it in a traditional essay format with your name, date, course information, etc., along with a title, at the beginning of the document. You will use one inch margins, 12 point font, and double spacing. If you chose to cite resources, plan to use APA style for this proposal. 

Grading Criteria

To earn a passing grade (a C, 79-79 pts) you must fulfill the minimum requirements of the essay:

  • stay within the page limit: 3 to 5 pages.
  • provide an overview of what the issue is that you are interested in and why it is significant.
  • focus on a single research question (explicitly stating it within the proposal).
  • reflect on what your specific experience(s) is/are with the issue (be specific, include concrete details).
  • discuss your purpose is in researching and writing on the issue.
  • discuss your perspective and/or opinion on the issue is right now.
  • describe your audience you select for Project 5 (where you answer the research questions);
    •  the audience is appropriate to the research question (it is not your classmates).
  • provide a clear organizational structure to the proposal.
  • speak in a clear, easy-to-understand manner.
  • check that sentences are complete with a subject and agreeing verb (no fragments or run-on sentences).
  • check that there are properly capitalized words and end of sentence punctuation.
  • write in an intelligible manner (not have so many grammar, mechanics, etc. issues that make the meaning of the text incomprehensible).

To earn an above average grade (a B, 80-89 points) you will also need to:

  • incorporate at least one outside source (added to the grading criteria)
  • discuss how and why the topic is controversial. Why does your proposed audience care about this topic? Or why should they care?
  • analyze the specific wants and needs of your audience;
  • motivate the audience to read/listen with an introduction that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • introduces the main topic, research question, and the purpose of the project.
    • makes the reader attentive and receptive to both the topic and the author.
    • grabs the reader's attention.
    • gives a brief history of the topic to justify its importance to the audience.
    • lists or outlines the rest of the research proposal.
  • wrap-up the text in a conclusion that does the following based on the needs of the rhetorical situation:
    • sums up your points about the purpose, audience, and you as the author.
  • provide a variety of sentence styles and lengths.
  • make sentences are tight and concise (no redundant or awkward words or phrases).
  • check that there are no pronouns with unclear referents.
  • use words correctly and consistently in their meanings.
  • follow the submission policies:
    • double-space your document, provide one-inch margins
    • include your name, the date, the class section #, the assignment name, and your project title at the top of the document.
    • use a standard, 12-point font (such as Times New Roman).
    • follow APA guidelines as for in-text citations.
    • follow APA guidelines as for reference list (bibliographic citations) at the end of the project.

To earn an excellent grade (an A, 90-100 points) you will also need to demonstrate careful attention to your writing arrangement, style and tone:

  • make each paragraph clearly function as a part of the project's argument.
  • provide clear transitions between the paragraphs/ideas above and below that show how each paragraph's main points are related to one another.
  • make sentences clearly flow from one to another, occasionally using transitional words and phrases.
  • make sentences sound crisp and flow smoothly (when read aloud, sentences sound appealing).
  • check for no spelling or typographical errors.
  • check that there are no dangling or misplaced modifiers.
  • make sure commas are used to help the syntax and meaning of the sentence.

You cannot earn a B or an A without also completing all the requirements in the earlier grade groupings.

Project #1: Rhetorical Analysis

posted Jan 13, 2013, 9:53 AM by Rochelle Rodrigo   [ updated Apr 30, 2013, 1:09 PM ]

The assignment prompt for this assignment comes in three parts:
  • DIY4: Writing a Rhetorical Analysis of Citations (after chapter 15 in the textbook)
  • Project #1: Rhetorical Analysis Assignment Prompt (this page)
  • P#1 Grading Criteria/Rubric (below)

Project #1: Rhetorical Analysis Assignment Prompt

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to analyze the citation practices of a scholarly article in your specific field/discipline/major/profession. You will want to understand how outside resources are incorporated within a scholarly argument in your field.

Audience

Your intended audience is for other students starting out in your field. Therefore, you will want to construct the final document in a format that is easy for other students to read and use. 

Content Requirements

  • Introduction: Include a brief introduction to the article that includes where and how you found it, a brief summary of the content, and a discussion of what it is representative for your field. Include a full bibliographic citation of the article using the style that the article uses to cite it's resources. 
  • Rhetorical Summary identifying the various rhetorical components of the article. You are required to both identify and provide evidence, from the article (and/or surrounding journal elements) to support your identification of each element. 
  • Citation Analysis
    • identification of the bibliographic style guide being used
    • types of content included in the citation
    • locations and formats of the in-text citation
    • location and format of the works cited/reference list
    • surrounding context of the in-text citation, including methods of 
      • introducing, 
      • incorporating, and 
      • interpreting the content from the citation.
  • Tips or Suggestions for Students in the Field

Submission Guidelines

Since this is meant to be a useful document, it may not be more than one page (front and back; so two pages). You will want to consider using headers and bullets to help organize the information. In the footer field of the document, include your information (name, date, etc). 

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