Nurses Association Of Jamaica

    association of
  • Formed in 1967, an attempt to establish a free trade area between Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand.
    jamaica
  • An island country in the Caribbean Sea, southeast of Cuba; pop. 2,713,000; official capital, Kingston; language, English
  • (jamaican) of or relating to Jamaica (the island or the country) or to its inhabitants; "Jamaican rum"; "the Jamaican Prime Minister"
  • A commercial and residential section of east central Queens in New York City
  • an island in the West Indies to the south of Cuba and to the west of Haiti
  • a country on the island of Jamaica; became independent of England in 1962; much poverty; the major industry is tourism
    nurses
  • A person employed or trained to take charge of young children
  • (nurse) one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)
  • (nurse) try to cure by special care of treatment, of an illness or injury; "He nursed his cold with Chinese herbs"
  • A wet nurse
  • A person trained to care for the sick or infirm, esp. in a hospital
  • (nurse) harbor: maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings); "bear a grudge"; "entertain interesting notions"; "harbor a resentment"
nurses association of jamaica Sgt Betty Orpin Caithness-shire Constabulary 1950s
Sgt Betty Orpin Caithness-shire Constabulary 1950s
Elizabeth ('Betty') Richard was born at Wick on 16 October 1909, the eldest daughter of Mr & Mrs David Richard. She later travelled to Toronto, Canada where she took up nursing. On returning to Scotland she worked for a time at Stratheden Hospital in Cupar, Fife. In 1935 she passed her final examination of the Royal Medico-Psychological Association and was appointed Matron of the Boys Orphanage at New Broughton, Jamaica. Service at the Metropolitan Nursing Home in Denmark Hill, London,led to her joining the Metropolitan Police as a Woman Police Constable (WPC). She joined that Force on 25 April 1938 and resigned on 26 November 1939. In 1940 she married Frank Orpin, a Marine Engineer in the Merchant Navy. Sadly he was lost at sea, presumed killed in action, ten months later. Betty Orpin then returned home to Wick and worked for two years in the office of the Procurator Fiscal (Public Prosecutor). The Fiscal, Mr Sinclair, considered that her work, knowledge and influence were such that he and Betty were 'joint Fiscals'. He said so in a letter he wrote to Betty on her leaving his employ. Mrs Orpin's nursing experience was such that the powers-that-be, who were responsible for organising war work, sought to have her return to nursing. The Chief Constable of Caithness, William Keir Cormack, however made strenuous efforts to have her instead return to Policing. Mr Cormack was one shrewd cookie. He had served as Chief Constable of the County since 1912, and he knew his way around. He finally succeeded in convincing the Ministries involved, and on 16 May 1943 she was appointed a member of the Women's Auxiliary Police Corps (W.A.P.C.). Betty Orpin was the third female in the County of Caithness to be so appointed, but her two predecessors had not remained long. The other two girls had been enrolled in the W.A.P.C. in 1942, but one of them departed that self-same year and the other left the service during 1943. Betty would be very different in that respect. Betty served as a member of the W.A.P.C. until the end of the war. Forces were then being strongly encouraged to appoint regular female officers. The days of the Police Service being a male-only preserve were finally gone. The Scottish Home Department approved the appointment of one Policewoman for the County of Caithness on 15 December 1945. Fifteen days later Betty Orpin officially transferred from the W.A.P.C. to the Caithness-shire Constabulary. She was stationed at Wick, where she remained throughout her service, and for most of which period she would be the only female officer in the County. The manner in which she was regarded by her colleagues, and superiors, comes clearly to light in a report from Chief Constable John W. Georgeson (who had been promoted to Chief Constable in 1952) to the County Clerk in June 1961: APPOINTMENT OF WOMAN POLICE CONSTABLE AT THURSO "It has been found that there is a need for a Woman Police Constable at Thurso and as the female civilian employee in Thurso Office would appear to be suitable for such an appointment, I beg to recommend - for consideration by the Police Authority – that application be made to the Scottish Home Department for a change in the Force's establishment to permit the appointment of a Woman Constable in place of the civilian employee." "The Woman Constable at Wick, Mrs E. Orpin, has a total of 18 years and 4 months approved service, and in addition she has a period of one year and 114 days service in class "A" of the war-time Women's Auxiliary Police Corps of this Force which she is unable to count for pension purposes (the Regulations permit only one-half of W.A.P.C. Service to be taken into account)." "As W.P.C. Orpin's work in the Force is well-known in the County, I feel that it is my duty to quote for the information of the Police Committee the following excerpt from H.M. Inspector of Constabulary's Annual Report for the year ended 31st December 1959: 'although the organisation and deployment of policewomen vary from force to force, there is generally a senior policewoman to supervise the work and welfare of the Staff. There is scope within existing establishments for re-assessing the present-day responsibilities of these officers and, in appropriate cases, for improving their status' The Chief Constable's letter was duly considered by the Police Committee at its meeting on 15 June 1961. It was minuted that : "The Chief Constable, in a letter dated 8/6/61, drew attention to the length of service which had been rendered by Mrs E. Orpin, the Woman Police Constable stationed at Wick. The Committee agreed that it would be appropriate to recognise Mrs Orpin's service by promotion to the higher rank of Temporary Sergeant. It was noted that such higher rank could be authorised on a personal basis, in recognition of the responsibilities of her post, and the Clerk was instructed to write to the Scottish Home Department accordingly." The next da
LASCO Nurse speaks at Oral Health Fair
LASCO Nurse speaks at Oral Health Fair
ANXIOUS TO TAKE CARE OF THE TEETH! The LASCO/Nurses Association of Jamaica Nurse of the Year 2011, Sophia Thomas- Daley, has the rapped attention of students from the Naggo Head Primary School, during a session on dental hygiene, at the LASCO/Jamaica Dental Association Oral Health Fair at Emmanuel Apostolic Church, Portmore. The event took place on October 5, and is part of the celebration for Oral Health Month. Students from primary and basic schools in St. Catherine who participated in the event were offered free dental examinations, presentations on oral healthcare and samples of LASCO’s dental health products.