Registration and Class Information for Psychology Undergraduate Registration


Summer and Fall, 2017

Internship, Psychology Seminar, Independent Study, and Other Special Classes for Summer and Fall 2017

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Summer 2017: Special Classes

PSY497 Sec (01): Internship in Psychology

Instructor: Rebecca Martin

Time: May 19-21 AND June 16-17

Contact Information for Interview: Rebecca Martin: martinr@newpaltz.edu

Course Description: You can take our internship course, with class meetings done as bookends (5/19-5-21; 6/16-6/17) and the actual internship done at a location that works for you (e.g., Long Island). To find out how to register, etc. please contact Dr. Rebecca Martin (see above). Supervised experience working in an applied setting related to psychology. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of 15 credits in practicum, fieldwork and independent study credits.

PSY593 Sec (90): Advanced Seminar in Evolutionary Psychology

Instructor: Glenn Geher

Time: HYBRID; Conference Dates: June 14-18 in Binghamton, NY

Course Description: This class uses the rich set of presentations at the annual NEEPS conference as an educational foundation in evolutionary psychology. Students who enroll in this hybrid class will learn about cutting-edge findings from evolutionary psychology from experts who come from all over the world. Via high-profile keynote addresses, a suite of oral presentations, and a large collection of poster presentations, students will be exposed to cutting-edge research on such topics as the nature of altruism, the nature of ingroup /outgroup biases, relationships and mating behaviors, aggression, evolutionarily informed neuroscience, and more. Students who sign up will also be invited to (and required to attend) special discussions sessions led by Dr. Geher along with other professors who help run NEEPS each year. Assignments will include (a) online readings and discussions via BlackBoard, (b) attendance at the full three-day conference (including the special class sessions), and (c) written assignments and possibly an exam done via BlackBoard the week after the conference. For more information, follow this link: http://evostudies.org/neeps-university-3-credit-graduate-class-in-evolutionary-psych-at-neeps-2017/

**SPECIAL NOTE** This course is a graduate level course, but Dr. Geher may be willing to consider advanced undergraduate students as well. 

For more information contact: Glenn Geher: geherg@newpaltz.edu

Fall 2017: Special Classes

PSY330 Sec (01): Crisis Intervention

Instructor: Jessica Purcell

Time: Wednesday 5:00-7:50

Contact Information for Interview: Call the Counseling Center at (845) 257-2920

Course Description: Basic counseling and crisis intervention skills using a didactic/experiential approach under professional psychological supervision. Theory of intervention in suicide, substance abuse, and developmental crises. Role play practice.


PSY495: Independent Study

Needs Instructor Approval for Enrollment

Description: Students will participate in independent research with a psychology department faculty member. It is the student’s responsibility to find a faculty member who will sponsor his/her work. Once the student has met with their chosen faculty member, if agreed upon, the faculty advisor will give the student the appropriate paperwork to fill out to receive independent study credit, which will count towards elective credits.

Faculty member’s interests can be found on the websites/profiles page herehttp://www.newpaltz.edu/psychology/directory.html

 

PSY497 Sec (01): Disaster Practicum in Psychology

Instructor: Amy Nitza

Time: Thursday 3:30-6:20

Contact for Interview or Registration: Rebecca Rodriguez: rrodriguez70@newpaltz.edu or (845) 257-3477

Course Description: Supervised experience working in an applied setting related to psychology. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of 15 credits in practicum, fieldwork and independent study credits. Requirement for Disaster Studies minors, Disaster Studies Minors only, Disaster Psychology must be fulfilled as a prerequisite

 

PSY497 Sec (02): Internship in Psychology

Instructor: Cecilia Leonardo

Time: Thursday 5:00-7:50

Contact Information for Interview: Cecilia Leonardo: leonardc@newpaltz.edu

Course Description: Supervised experience working in an applied setting related to psychology. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of 15 credits in practicum, fieldwork and independent study credits.

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Summer 2017: Seminar Topic

PSY498 Seminar in Psychology WI* (pre-req. = PSY 311, Psychological Research Methods)

Sec 01:

Title: Debates Over DSM-5

Instructor: Jonathan Raskin

When: ONLINE

Course Description: 

In-depth review of ongoing debates over changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which was published in May 2013. Topics to be covered include new disorders, changes to existing disorders, the elimination of existing disorders, scientific support for revisions, proposals for further study, and analysis of why the DSM-5 process has generated so much controversy.

Fall 2017: Seminar Topics

PSY498 Seminar in Psychology Sections 1-5 WI* (pre-req. = PSY 311, Psychological Research Methods)

Sec 01:

Title: Psychology of Culture & Prejudice 

Instructor: Melanie Hill

When: Wednesdays 2:00-4:50

Course Description: 

This course will be co-taught by Dr. Melanie Hill and Dr. Tabitha Holmes.  The course will focus on three main themes: 1.) how culture influences human development; 2.) how/why differences between and within cultures often result in the development and maintenance of prejudicial beliefs, and 3.) how dominant cultural narratives influence the lived experiences of individuals as they play a role in both individual development and prejudicial thinking. In other words, we will explore how and why cultural groups differ and why it is so difficult for people to understand and accept these differences. This course will draw from scholarship in psychology, anthropology, sociology, education, and related fields.


Sec 02:

Title: Psychology of Culture & Prejudice

Instructor: Tabitha Holmes 

When: Wednesdays 2:00-4:50

Course Description: 

This course will be co-taught by Dr. Melanie Hill and Dr. Tabitha Holmes.  The course will focus on three main themes: 1.) how culture influences human development; 2.) how/why differences between and within cultures often result in the development and maintenance of prejudicial beliefs, and 3.) how dominant cultural narratives influence the lived experiences of individuals as they play a role in both individual development and prejudicial thinking. In other words, we will explore how and why cultural groups differ and why it is so difficult for people to understand and accept these differences. This course will draw from scholarship in psychology, anthropology, sociology, education, and related fields.


Sec 03:

Title: Seminar on Developmental Psychopathology

Instructor: Bobby Bui

When: Mondays 3:30-6:20

Course Description: 

This course explores psychopathology from a developmental perspective, recognizing that pathology expresses itself in different ways at different ages and stages of development. Concepts such as risk and resilience and early predictors of outcomes will be integrated into a review of the major types of psychopathology. The course will consider both early theories and more recent scientific research literature on each condition with the goal of understanding the causes of each disorder and the ways the disorder manifests differently across individuals. It is highly recommended that students have completed PSY 412 - Abnormal Psychology and a course in development (PSY 343 - Psychology of Infancy and Childhood or PSY 344 - Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood) prior to taking this course.


Sec 04:

Title: Psychology and Aging

Instructor: Jacquelyn Berry

When: Tuesdays 5:00-7:50

Course Description: 

Why do we care about how old people think? First, one in three Americans is aged 50 years or older and within the next two decades one in five persons will be aged 65 and older. Second, one day we will be old too, ideally, and will want the rapidly changing society and all the various technological advances to take into account our needs, limitations, and capabilities whilst also capitalizing on our wisdom. Cognition and Aging is the study of how people’s cognitive abilities and psychological make-up change as a part of the normal aging process. Reduced cognitive ability is a normal part of getting old but research shows that the brain always has the capacity to grow and to establish new neural connections. Certain aspects of cognition even improve as a result of aging such as vocabulary, inductive reasoning, and problem-solving approaches. Seminar topics will include attention, memory, and reasoning in the context of the aged brain, as well as how mental health issues are affected by the aging process.


Sec 05:

Title: Mental Illness and Stigma

Instructor: Greta Winograd

When: Thursdays 11:00-1:50

Course Description: 

People with mental illness have been stigmatized throughout history. When individuals experience stigma, they are labeled and stereotyped. Others keep away or have strong emotional responses. Status loss, discrimination, and reluctance to seek needed support are among the serious consequences. In this seminar, we will discuss theories of stigma dating back to the work of renowned sociologist Erving Goffman. We will become familiar with research investigating the general public’s understanding of mental illness and how stigma operates in the real world. We will also step outside of the research literature and observe for ourselves how people talk about mental illness and how people with mental illness are portrayed in the popular media. Finally, we will explore innovative educational interventions -- some involving theater -- designed to reduce stigmatizing attitudes/behaviors while offering accurate information about mental illness and mental health services.


 *WI - Writing Intensive