Since 2007, notloB Music has presented close to 200 folk, old-time, bluegrass, progressive string band and Celtic concerts in unique venues throughout the greater Boston area.

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notloB Music Presents... 

Emma Beaton and Nic Gareiss

Saturday, October 10, 8pm (doors at 7:30)
Gregorian Oriental Rugs
2284 Washington St, Newton Lower Falls, MA 02462

notloB's Fall season continues at Gregorian Oriental Rugs' beautiful stone, brick and wood mill building overlooking the Charles River. Seating for 70 in chairs or on piles of beautiful oriental rugs.

"The notloB Music series will present a concert by Emma Beaton and Nic Gareiss on Oct. 10 at Gregorian Rugs, 2284 Washington Street in Newton Lower Falls at 8 p.m. A native of Canada and daughter of Scottish immigrants, Beaton grew up playing Celtic music on cello but subsequently expanded her tastes to include American roots and picked up banjo, all the while honing her singing talents. Named Canadian Folk’s Young Performer of the Year in 2008, she lived in Boston while studying at the Berklee College of Music and is now in Nashville. Gareiss is widely known for his innovative percussive dance style – he has performed locally at “A Christmas Celtic Sojourn” and BCMFest, among other events – but is also considerably skilled on vocals and bouzouki. The two released a CD in 2010."
-Sean Smith (notloB alumnus) in the Boston Irish Reporter, 10/1/15

General admission $20
Seniors and students $15

Emma Beaton: cello, banjo, vocals
“She is a truly gifted musician in many genres and on many instruments. She is one of the most exciting young cellists in the folk music world today, taking the cello into unprecedented territory in the Celtic, Cajun, southern Appalachian old-time, and Scandinavian genres. As a vocalist, her clear, powerful voice is truly captivating...”
- Natalie Haas

It is no wonder that someone from the very edge of the North American continent would possess a voice as naturally captivating as the verdant Pacific Northwest. Emma Beaton, young cellist and singer from Qualicum Beach, British Columbia has what bluegrass super-star Laurie Lewis called, a "voice like a laser," clear, effortless, and striking to the core.

The child of two Scottish emigrants, Beaton is no stranger to the traditional music realm. She learned to play the cello amongst seas of fiddlers under Alasdair Fraser's San Francisco Scottish fiddlers and at music camps around the US. This forced her to develop her own style of folk cello, adapting dance tunes for the instrument and conjuring up her own rhythmic accompaniment style to suit the fiddle repertoire.

She has studied with other notable innovative cellists, under Natalie Haas at the Berklee College of Music as well as with Tristan Clarridge and Rushad Eggleston, both of Crooked Still. She has appeared on Scottish national television, performed at the Aberdeen Youth Arts Festival, and guested with Alasdair Fraser, Bruce Molsky, Back of the Moon, and Hanneke Cassel.

At the age of eighteen, Beaton won the Canadian Folk Music Award's Young Performer of the Year after the release of her debut recording, "Pretty Fair Maid." A year later, after moving to Boston to study cello on scholarship at Berklee, Beaton's grace and flair remain, now magnified by a year at conservatory.

Emma was a founding member of the modern American string band Joy Kills Sorrow, which recently released the band's first release with Beaton as 
frontwoman, titled Darkness Sure Becomes This City. Emma has also recently released a duo record with bouzouki-player, singer, and dancer, Nic Gareiss.

Nic Gareiss: bouzouki, percussive dance, vocals
“The human epitome of the unbearable lightness of being...Gareiss is more fleet of foot than an Olympian sprinter and more buoyant than a helium-filled balloon...his restraint is palpable and freeform flight is inevitable.”
– Siobhán Long, The Irish Times

Michigan-born dancer, musician, and dance researcher Nic Gareiss has studied a broad variety of percussive movement forms from around the world.  At the age of eight he began taking tap lessons with Sam and Lisa Williams at Vision Studio of Performing Arts in Mount Pleasant, Michigan.  Soon after, he was exposed to fiddle music and traditional dance at the Wheatland Music Organization’s annual Traditional Arts Weekend.  It was there that he had his first instruction in Appalachian clogging with Michigan dance mentor, Sheila Graziano.  As a teenager, Nic also studied Irish step dance with John Heinzman, T.C.R.G., Appalachian flat-footing with Ira Bernstein, Québécois step dance with Benoit Bourque, and improvisation and composition with Sandy Silva.  

In 2001, Nic began an educational relationship with the internationally-renowned company, Footworks Percussive Dance Ensemble.  After meeting Footworks’ director, NEA Choreography Fellow Eileen Carson at the Augusta Heritage Center dance camp, Nic was invited to spend nine weeks apprenticing with the company in Annapolis, Maryland.  While working with Footworks, Gareiss danced in their evening-length theater show, Incredible Feets as well as two new collaborative works: SoleMates, with StepAfrika and The Crossing, with Grammy-winning recording artist Tim O’Brien.

In 2007, Nic spent a year studying traditional Irish music and dance performance at the Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick, Ireland.  There he studied Cape Breton step dance with Mats Melin as well as Irish dance and choreography with Orfhlaith Ni Bhriain, T.C.R.G, A.D.C.R.G.  He also studied privately with contemporary dance artist and Irish dancer Colin Dunne and sean-nós dancer Seosamh Ó Néachtain.

Nic has performed many of the luminaries of traditional music from Ireland, Scotland, and North America, including The Chieftains, Dervish, Gráda, Beoga, Téada, 
FIDIL, Le Vent du Nord, Genticorum, Dr. Anthony Barrand, Buille, Liz Carroll, Frankie Gavin, Martin Hayes, Bruce Molsky, Darol Anger and Alasdair Fraser.  His dancing has been seen on CMT in Uncle Earl's music video, Streak O' Lean, Steak O' Fat, and also on Ireland's RTÉ 2 in the film Unsung, commissioned by the Irish Arts Council, which premiered during the 2008 Dublin Dance Festival. He has performed for the Irish head of state, An Taoiseach Brian Cowen and American Energy Secretary Steven Chu.  In 2011, Nic received two commissions from the Cork Opera House to create new solo percussive dance works for Reich’s pieces Six Marimbas and Clapping Music in honor of the composer’s 75th birthday.  The commissions were hailed by the Irish Times as “a leftfield tour-de-force with irresistible wow factor.

Nic continues to study, seeking out new forms of 
floor-music and shoe rhythms, recently studying flamenco with Felipe de Algeciras in Dublin and American percussive dance with Rhythm in Shoes founder and artistic director Sharon Leahy of Dayton, Ohio.  

Nic has taught workshops in percussive dance technique, American clogging, 
musicality and improvisation internationally.  He has had the pleasure of teaching at Alasdair Fraser’s Valley of the Moon Scottish Fiddle Camp in northern California, as well as for Scottish Culture & Traditions Organization, The University of Limerick, Michigan State University, Alma College, the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, and the North Atlantic Fiddle Convention in Derry, Northern Ireland.  Through workshops for both movers and musicians, Nic seeks to remind students of the crucial, intrinsic, and historic place that percussive dance has held in the formation and development of many world music traditions as well as encourage dancers with the innately sonic capabilities of movement.  
Nic holds degrees in anthropology and music from Central Michigan University.  In 2011, he earned a distinction from the Norwegian University for Science and Technology’s IPEDAM Erasmus Intensive for Ethnochoreologists.  Nic completed post-graduate work in 2012, earning 
a MA in ethnochoreology from the University of Limerick.  He continues to tour internationally, working with dance communities and presenting solo percussive dance choreography and dance research.

notloB Music Presents Emma Beaton and Nic Gareiss, Acoustic and Unplugged
Saturday, October 10, 2015, 8pm (doors at 7:30)
Gregorian Oriental Rugs
2284 Washington St, Newton Lower Falls, MA 02462
General admission $20
Seniors and students $15
Tickets are on sale through Eventbrite -

Roy Williams and the Human Hands

Saturday, October 24, 7:30pm (cafe opens at 6:00pm)
Arts at the Armory Cafe
191 Highland Ave., Somerville
Suggested donation $10-20

Roy Williams, an American songwriter, guitarist, and multi-instrumentalist, writes music with a curious ear and an open mind. From the classic pop tunes heard on the first cassette Roy owned—The Beatles “Live at the BBC in 1963”—to the incomparable instrumental canon of Django Reinhart, Roy’s influences eclipse genre categorization, a trait that is reflected in the adventurous spirit of his own original songs.

After growing up in Clark’s Green, Pennsylvania, in a musical house where Neil Young, Buffalo Springfield, and especially The Beatles were religion, Roy began playing gigs in nearby Scranton and soon moved to New York City to perform gypsy jazz with renowned guitarist Stephane Wrembel. Roy worked with Wrembel for four years and toured throughout Central America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. He now lives in Brooklyn, New York, where he regularly plays out with his mentors and friends Jim Campilongo, Nick Driscoll, and Alex Hargreaves, and leads his own band.

Roy often performs on piano, mandolin, bass, and has known how to play a G chord on guitar since he can remember. He released his debut solo album, Throwing Punches, in February 2015, which features ten original compositions. Roy is currently at work on two upcoming albums: a compilation of instrumental songs by his group Roy Williams and the Human Hands (featuring Alex Hargreaves and Nick Driscoll), and a solo record of rock n roll tunes.

Reservations (available by 10/7)

Elizabeth and Ben Anderson
Wednesday, October 28, 7:30pm (cafe opens at 6:00pm)
Arts at the Armory Cafe
191 Highland Ave, Somerville, Massachusetts 02143

admission is by free-will donation, $10-15 suggested

notloB Music's Fall music series continues at our new venue, the intimate (50 seat) cafe at the Somerville Armory, presenting for forth time...
11/01/13 Fellswater w/ Elizabeth and Ben Anderson @ JPUU
03/21/14 Elizabeth and Ben Anderson @ Outpost 186
10/09/14 Rushad Eggleston w/ Elizabeth and Ben Anderson @ Davis Square Theatre
...Elizabeth and Ben Anderson

Elizabeth and Ben Anderson, a Scottish fiddle and cello duo, have been gaining an enthusiastic following in the Boston area and throughout New England. Blending Scottish tunes with lively rhythms and innovative harmonies, they create a sound rooted in tradition, inspired by the contemporary, and completely original. On stage, they captivate audiences with their ability to effortlessly communicate musical nuances as only siblings can. In the words of WGBH's Brian O'Donovan, "They have taken the influence of people like Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas and really made their own mark on... traditional music." 

Elizabeth studies at Berklee College of Music and Ben is a student at Westborough High School.


notloB Music Presents... Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons
w/ Elijah Wald & Sandrine Sheon 
Tuesday, November 3, 7:30pm 
 (cafe opens at 6:00pm)
Arts at the Armory Cafe
191 Highland Ave, Somerville, Massachusetts 02143

notloB Music's Fall music series continues at the intimate (50 seat) cafe at the Somerville Armory.

The history of American roots music in the early 20th century could never fit into an encyclopedia. it’s too ramshackle, too rambunctious, too radical. Fiddlers, guitarists, banjo players, and all kinds of folks rambled those early roads, learning from each other, inspiring each other, and pushing the music in new directions. Music constantly switched back and forth across the racial divide, beholden only to the beat and the dance. It’s this fevered period of musical exchange that inspires Northwest roots music duo Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons. The songs on their new album, Take Yo Time, tap into everything from the hokum jug bands of Gus Cannon and the Memphis Sheiks, to country blues masters Reverend Gary Davis, Robert Johnson, and Blind Willie McTell. They also touch on ancient English ballads like House Carpenter, Appalachian murder ballads like the classic Tom Dooley, and the early jazz compositions of Shelton Brooks and Duke Ellington. All of these traditions are tied together in the swirling musical whirlpool of pre-war American music. With a well-rosined fiddle and an old banjo, Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons are tracing these backroads, bringing the songs back to life.

Ben and Joe have been playing together for almost 5 years, the last 3 of which sent them to the Port Townsend Acoustic Blues Festival, learning at the feet of the elders of the acoustic blues tradition. They found an affinity in the many branches that tied into the blues and created this duo as a way to explore these branches. Their musical kinship and sense of joy in interpreting this music is evident and was the basis of an invitation Dom Flemons (formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops) to form his band when he went solo. Ben and Joe joined Dom on his recent album, Prospect Hill, and toured the US with him, furthering their knowledge of Anglo and African American music traditions. Rather than thinking of their music as blues, it’s best to situate Ben and Joe (and Dom) as American songsters. A songster traditionally refers to an African-American artist whose repertoire is much broader than the old blues, and spans many of the genres that Ben and Joe Inhabit. Big Bill Broonzy and Mississippi John Hurt are classic examples of songsters. Whatever you want to call it, Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons make American music. They make music that hews to the rough-and-tumble collisions of musical inspirations from the early 20th century; music that paved the way for everything we enjoy today.

As we did at our Loring-Greenough concert series, admission is by free-will donation, $10-20 suggested.
notloB Music's concerts are presented in several unique listening room environments throughout greater Boston.
notloB's latest (Fall, 2015) and most unique venue is Gregorian Oriental Rugs
2284 Washington St, Newton Lower Falls, MA 02462 (seating capacity 60, more if patrons sit on the piled rugs, which we think are the best seats in the house). Scott Gregorian loves community and arts-oriented events. So much so he has opened his store to community organizations and area producers. Earlier this year Gregorian listed his performance space in a registry run by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, where it was found by notloB Music. “The Massachusetts Cultural Council provides a service named “SpaceFinder Mass”, a kind of a dating match site where people having venues can share them with producers and artists and producers and artists can search for performance venues” explained Boudreau, who serves on the Arlington Cultural Council. “As we generally do not use artificial sound reinforcement, I was immediately attracted to Gregorian Rug’s brick and stone interior and vaulted ceiling. The piles of gorgeous oriental rugs was the clincher, so we reached out to Scott. Within days we had met in person, discussed the possibilities and agreed to a Fall series.” The rest, as they say, is, or will be, history.

Unity Somerville
, 6 William Street, Somerville (5 blocks north of Davis Square, 175 seats). notloB has been presenting at Unity since 2009. Past acts presented include Spider John Koerner, The Jay Ungar & Molly Mason Family Band, Malinky, Lissa Schneckenburger Band featuring Ari and Mia Friedman, Jeremy Kittel Band (featuring Tristan Clarridge, Simon Chrisman and Bodek Janke), Blue Moose and the Unbuttoned Zippers, Tao Rodriguez-Seeger Band, Long Time Courting, Folk Arts Quartet, Guy Mendilow Band, The Bee Eaters, Tornado Rider, Paul Geremia & Jaime Brockett, to name a few. 

Carriage House Violins of Johnson String Instruments,1039 Chestnut St, Newton Upper Falls, near the intersection of Rt.9 and I-95/Rt. 128, a 15 minute walk from Eliot Street T station (Green line D (Riverside)). The space seats 50. 
"Carriage House Violins is the instrument sales division of Johnson String Instrument is a full-service violin shop, offering a wide array of both fine antique instruments and modern instruments by today’s best makers. Owned by Adam Johnson, son of Johnson String Instrument founders Roger and Carol Johnson, Carriage House Violins and Johnson String Instrument make up the east coast’s largest, most comprehensive violin shop. Carriage House Violins was founded in 2005 by Christopher Reuning, of Reuning & Son Violins. In November 2013, Johnson String Instrument assumed ownership of Carriage House Violins, to better serve the growing customer base of both firms. The merger offered an expanded inventory of first-class instruments while retaining the high caliber of personalized service loyal Carriage House Violins customers have come to expect. Carriage House Violins offers every serious stringed instrument player a lifetime of opportunity, convenience, service and support."
Shows are open to all ages.
MBTA: Riverside green line to Eliot, then walk about 3/4 mile (not recommended during the Winter months).
Handicap accessible

Arts at the Armory
(191 Highland Ave., Somerville, 50 and 300 seats). notloB's other new (Fall 2015) venue is actually two spaces in one. The intimate cafe serves coffee, teas and pastries as well as beer and wine; the larger theater seats up to 300. 
Free parking in the back lot and on street.
MBTA: Arts at the Armory is approximately a 15 minute walk from Davis Square which is on the MBTA Red Line, or take either the 88 or 90 bus from Lechmere (Green Line) or Davis Square (Red Line). Get off at the Highland Avenue and Lowell Street stop. You can also get there from Sullivan Square (Orange Line) via the 90 bus. Get off at the Highland Avenue and Benton Road stop.
Bicycle: The Armory is four blocks (down Lowell Street) from the Somerville Community Path.

Outpost 186
, 186 Hampshire Street, Inman Square, Cambridge (35 seats) served as the home of the former Lord Geoffrey Presents rising Berklee College of Music and New England Conservatory rising talent series and continues that series.
"OUTPOST 186 is a new arts, media and performance space at 186 1/2 Hampshire Street in Inman Square, Cambridge. Outpost 186 hosts several ongoing series of experimental & improvised music performances, multi-media events, poetry readings and film, seven days a week, as well as periodic art exhibits. Open during scheduled shows or by appointment." Shows are open to all ages.
MBTA: several bus routes serve Inman Square, or take the red line to Central Square and walk 4 blocks.
Sorry, Outpost 186 is not handicap accessible.

For questions and further information, please do NOT contact the venues. Send an email to notlobreservations at gmail dot com.

*...artists often ask for for gigs which we cannot always accomodate, here's where you come in. Have you ever thought about hosting a house concert? That can be arranged. Email

notloB's concert tickets are available through Eventbrite 
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notloB News

notloB was honored to have two very special patrons at the 
March 22nd Ellie & Sumaia | Jenna & Mairi concert!
Patrick Swanson, Artistic DirectorGeorge Emlen, Music Director

Patrick Swanson, Artistic Director & George Emlen, Music Director

Stay tuned for details of why they were in attendance.

An Evening to Support the Alzheimer's Foundation of America

NotloB Music is donating tickets to two of its upcoming Arlington concerts, Jayme Stone's Lomax Project (April 1) and Darol Anger And The Furies (April 25), to Michelle Canning & Rough Edges' "4th Annual A Night on the Edge!" benefit concert and raffel Saturday, March 21 at 7:00pm in Chelmsford. 

Concert details

Brittany and Nic will be returning to notlob in seperate concerts in March and April. Until then, relive their January concerts....

"Fiddler Brittany Haas (Crooked Still, Haas Kowert Tice) and the much-celebrated percussive dancer Nic Gareiss (This is How We Fly) performed two shows in the Boston area over the weekend. One of those shows was at the Old Schwamb Mill in Arlington where photographer Jason Elon Goodman shot a great video (below) before the duo’s stunning performance there to benefit the Mill – the oldest continuously operating mill in the U.S.
The video has been making its way around social media this week, so I caught up with the Brittany & Nic for a quick backstory. Here’s what they shared...."

notloB was proud to be the producer.

Read full article here.

Brittany Haas & Nic Gareiss - Screengrab from video by Jason Elon Goodman

Brittany Haas & Nic Gareiss – Screengrab from video by Jason Elon Goodman

Brittany Haas & Nic Gareiss / Peaks of Otter / Old Schwamb Mill / Salt Stage / 01.18.15

A Traveling Salt Stage Production.

Recorded on a pair of "Edwina" microphones hand made by Philip Graham of ear trumpet labs.

Salt Stage Presents both local artists and those on a migratory path through the state of Maine in intimate portraiture: musicians, poets, performers, chefs, farmers, painters, sculptors and more. These performances are archived live without over-dubbing or post manipulation unless insisted upon by the artist in the performance. A high resolution recording system and one or two camera angles capture a cinematic feeling full of both visual and sonic tonality, paired with simple & clean editing . When not outside on location, windows are often left open to incorporate gulls, rainfall and other sonic signatures of Maine. Vintage lenses are also integral to enhance the filmic look of the vignettes. The Salt Stage began in Old Port, Portland but has now expanded to everywhere and anywhere, as archived in the Traveling Salt Stage section.... Watch the video here.


There will never be any annoying ringtones at a notloB! Before each, patrons are asked to turn off electric devices or put them in silent mode. Pianist Marc-André Hamelin has a tongue-in-cheek musical reply, "Valse Irritation", based on the Nokia ringtone.

Hamelin - Valse Irritation d'après Nokia 'Ringtone Waltz'

notloB Music is dedicated to the memory of Jack Hardy (d. March 11, 2011), who, with David Massengill and Peggy Seeger, graced our stage November 1, 2008, and John McGann (d. April 6, 2012), who performed with Flynn Cohen, Matt Heaton, and Danny Noveck  on November 20, 2012. Rest in peace, Jack and John! 

In John McGann's honor we post "Song for John", "An original tune dedicated to the great John McGann. ...composed by John Mailander and performed by John Mailander - Fiddle, Molly Tuttle - Guitar, Brittany Karlson - Bass and Joe Walsh - Mandolin", notloBBers all. Filmed by Adrianna Ciccone in Brighton, MA.

Published on Dec 27, 2014

Song for John

June 7, 2010- Actor/Musician Dominic Chianese introduces co-emcee Jack Hardy at the Gerde's Folk City 50th Anniversary celebration. Here, Jack performs his classic "Go Tell the Savior." Little did we know, Jack would be gone 9 months later. A true champion of original songwriters, Jack hosted Monday night 'workshops' in his apartment on Bedford and Houston in NYC for over 35 years.

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Founded in 2007, notloB Music has presented >150 folk, old-time, bluegrass, string band, Celtic and country blues concerts in unique venues throughout the greater Boston area. We present at the Davis Square Theater in Somerville, Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis in Washington Square, Brookline, Carriage House Violins in Newton Upper Falls and Outpost 186 in Inman Square, Cambridge. Concerts in your home can be arranged.


Other websites of interest
NEFolk ~ a news and discussion group celebrating and supporting traditional folk, folk revival, folk rock, roots, blues and bluegrass music and dance in the northeast US and from beyond that affects our community.

A Nobel Prize for Pete Seeger

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Community and Independent College Radio Community and independent are types of radio service that offer a third model of radio broadcasting  beyond commercial and public service. Community and independent college stations serve geographic communities and communities of interest. They broadcast content that is popular to a local/specific audience but which may often be overlooked by commercial/mass-media and so-called "public" broadcasters.