Democracy


"school uniforms should be decided by democratic vote"

Arguments

 

 

 

Attitude

Behavior

Bullying

Competition

Cost

Creativity

Crime

Debate

Democracy

Discipline

Diversity

Easy

Equality

Individuality

Learning

Peer Pressure

Personality

Pride

Rights

Security

Sport

Values

Violence

 

 

   Resources
 

 

 

   Conclusions
   
Some suggest that it should be up to the respective school to decide whether there should be more focus on discipline, even if that came at the cost of other values. However, a public school should accommodate families with a wide range of backgrounds.
   
Mandatory school uniforms at public schools are prone to violate inalienable rights, including freedom of expression and the prior right for families to decide how their children are to be educated.

Discussions

For

"Whether a school should have uniforms, that should be decided by democratic vote - if the majority wants it, then that's democracy!" -  [anonymous]

 

Against 

"Democracy implies respect for people's rights. In our kind of democracy, the rights of people are affirmed in a Bill of Rights, in international treaties, etc." -  [anonymous]

 

 Background

 

Important US precedents are:

 
 US Supreme Court case "Wisconsin vs Yoder" (1972)
The court ruled that this Amish family had a legitimate right to homeschooling 


 US Supreme Court case "Troxel vs Granville" (June 2000)
Affirms the fundamental right of parents to control the upbringing of their children, including their education


Tinker vs Des Moines case (1969) - students are entitled to freedom of expression of their views

 

See also the UN:


UN UDHR (Universal Declaration of Human Rights)
Article 26 (3) says that "parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children". 

 


UN ICCPR - Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion
Article 18 (1) says: "Everyone shall have the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. This right shall include freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his choice, and freedom, either individually or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in worship, observance, practice and teaching." Paragraph (2) says: "No one shall be subject to coercion which would impair his freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his choice".

 

For more links, see also:


Links at WHEN (World Home Education Network)