Debate


guidelines

Arguments

 

 

Attitude

Behavior

Bullying

Competition

Cost

Creativity

Crime

Debate

Democracy

Discipline

Diversity

Easy

Equality

Individuality

Learning

Peer Pressure

Personality

Pride

Rights

Security

Sport

Values

Violence

 

 

 

 

   Notes
 
While school uniforms may reduce some kind of peer pressure, they increase other types of peer pressure between students.
 
Some suggest that school uniforms reduced discrimination, bullying, violence and crime, but there is little or no evidence in research to support that. Anyway, these are different arguments that are discussed in more detail elsewhere at this site.
 
School uniforms may impose some sense of equality upon students, but whether this was desirable is a matter of politics. It's inappropriate for a public school to impose one specific political view, while silencing the opposite view. 
 
Mandatory school uniforms at public schools are prone to violate inalienable rights, including freedom of expression and the prior right for families to decide how their children are to be educated.

The need to learn to debate issues can be used as an argument to initiate debate about school uniforms at school.
 
If school uniforms have been introduced at school without much debate of the arguments, then why not start a debate now? If uniforms are planned to be introduced at school without debate, then the more reason to call for one. Is debate being avoided, because there's lack of research that supports uniforms? Have students and parents been given an opportunity to discuss the issue? In starting a debate on the issue, here are some guidelines that may be helpful.
 
 
 Schedule of Events
 
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Terms of Debate
 ----------
 
1. Call for debate.
 
2. Agree on representatives - one person for each side.
 
3. Representatives agree on a debate question, such as:
     "School uniforms should be introduced at our school!"
     "Our school should abolish school uniforms!"
 
4. Representatives propose:
     - the agenda points for the debate;
     - the time limits for each agenda point; 
 
5. Representatives for each side choose three speakers, and
 
6. Representatives agree on an independent person to:
     - chair the debate; 
     - follow the agenda points;
     - observe time limits for each point of the agenda;
     - rule on points of order;
     - give points to each speaker;
     - deduct penalty points for unacceptable behavior; and
     - deliver the verdict.
 

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Agenda of the Debate
----------
1. Introduction - The  person who chairs the debate mentions:
    - why we are here;
    - the terms (including the statement);
    - the agenda;
    - how points will be given/deducted; and
    - who the speakers are for each side.
 
2. First speaker for the affirmative side:
    - intro: argues the need for change
    - case: present argument in favor
       (DO NOT introduce any new argument hereafter)
 
3. First speaker for the negative side:
    - case: presents argument against
      (DO NOT introduce any new argument hereafter)
 
4. Second speaker for the negative side:
    - rebut: attack argument in favor by
       presenting counter-arguments 
 
5. Second speaker for the affirmative side:
    - rebut: attack the previous argument against by
       presenting counter-arguments 
 
6. Third speaker affirmative side:
    - present summation
 
7. Third speaker negative side:
    - present summation
 
8.  The  person who chairs the debate:
     - thanks those involved;
     - adds up the points given to each speaker;
     - deducts penalty points for unacceptable behavior;
     - delivers the verdict; and
     - concludes the debate.