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About this issue's contributors...



About this issue's contributors...





Kurt Beaulieu is a Montreal-based comics artist. He is best known for his strip Sabine, installments of which have appeared in various underground publications, including MensuHell, BingBang and The Morning Dew Review. He is also the author-artist of the comic books Repent Sinners and Glitch Nos. 1 and 2. Semolina, a graphic novel-in-progress concerning the bizarre lives of an all-female industrial band, is his latest ongoing project. Kurt's pages at Comic Space: http://www.comicspace.com/kurtbeaulieu/.



Artie Gold (1947-2007) was a Canadian bard associated with the Véhicule poets of Montreal. Known for his dark and rather imaginative sense of humour, he published the majority of his volumes of verse in the 1970s before prematurely ‘retiring’, more or less. His final volume, The Hotel Victoria Poems, appeared in 2003. Ill health—mostly allergies and emphysema—plagued him for most of his life, and he passed away on St. Valentine's Day, 2007. A tome compiling all of his volumes of verse, The Collected Books of Artie Gold, was published posthumously by Talon Books in the fall of 2010. He is pictured here affront fellow Véhicule poet and publisher Endre Farkas in 1990. (Photo by Geoff Isherwood.) For more information on Artie Gold: his entry at The Literary Underground Wiki.




Bill Harvey was one of the students at John Buscema’s original Workshop For Comic Book Art, in NYC. He has published the DangerWorld comic book and publishes THE ODDs comic strip. Michigan born and bred, he lives in the Detroit suburbs, and when not laid off, works as a computer technician. He generally considers himself a penciller/plotter in the arena of comic books. He does inking and lettering out of necessity. His favourite comic book was The Fantastic Four with art by Jack Kirby. At age 56, he would love to be part of a documentary on the life and works of Jack Kirby, mostly centred on his theatrical approach to comic books, his unfettered imagination and glorious artwork. Mr. Harvey's website is www.BeholdComics.com.




Dennis Hyer is a New Jersey comics artist who doesn't have a lot to write about himself except that he loves old movies and television shows.  He is also an amateur curmudgeon, with no patience for anime, rap music, modern newspaper comics, asphalt driveways, or anything produced by the Disney Channel (in that order).  Aside from classic cartoons and comic strips, his other areas of interest include billiards, anthropology, girls, Indians, and agriculture.  Hyer's website: http://www.mulleinfields.com/.


Abraham Kurp lives in a little suburb in North America with his father, mother, and sister. He spends his days toiling away at his desk, occasionally being interrupted by his four legged ‘brother’ Tobi for belly rubs. Abraham started reading comics at the suggestion of his sister, Hannah (whoever said girls don't read comics?) and found he liked them very much, though not the superhero kind. When not toiling he enjoys reading, movies, internetting, goofing around, and car sex. Abraham is going to continue on with his writing as he begins studying to be a fourth grade teacher.


Robin S. Rosenberg is a clinical psychologist in private practice and has taught psychology at Lesley University and Harvard University. She is board certified in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, and has been certified in clinical hypnosis. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Psychology and is a member of the Academy for Eating Disorders. Her published titles with co-author Stephen M. Kosslyn include Abnormal Psychology (Worth Publishers) and Introducing Psychology: Brain, Person, Group (Allyn & Bacon / Pearson).  She received her B.A. in psychology from New York University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Rosenberg did her clinical internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center, had a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Community Health Plan, and was on the staff at Newton-Wellesley Hospital's Outpatient Services. Dr. Rosenberg specializes in treating people with eating disorders, depression, and anxiety. In addition to her more conventional clinical work, Dr. Rosenberg has demonstrated how superheroes and their stories illuminate various psychological phenomena. Her analyses open doors into more general psychological issues, and have led to effective ways to convey life lessons. Her major titles in this line of study are The Psychology of Superheroes (Ed.), What is a Superhero? (co-edited with Peter Coogan), and Superhero Origins: What Makes Superheros Tick and Why We CareAmong her teaching experiences, Dr. Rosenberg has taught a brief (noncredit) course at MIT on Superheroes and the Life Lessons They Teach Us. Among her speaking experiences, she was featured on the History Channel's show, Batman Unmasked: The Psychology of the Dark Knight, and she speaks at comic book conventions. She also contributes regularly to her Psychablog.  More information regarding Dr. Rosenberg can be gleaned from her general website.



Lorraine Schein is a New York poet and writer whose poems and stories have appeared in numerous science fiction and fantasy anthologies, including Wild Women and Angel Body and Other Magic for the Soul (Wordcraft). Her solo titles include the novelette Raw Brunettes (Wordcraft) and a collection of science fiction poetry, The Futurist's Mistress (Mayapple Press). She holds a MFA in Poetry from NYC's The New School. A former proofreader at Marvel Comics, a portion of her thesis, ‘Poetry and Comics’, has previously appeared at the Exterminating Angel website.





Bianca Stone is a Brooklyn-based poet and artist, often combining the two media to create her poetry comics’. Born in Vermont in 1983, her mother is novelist Abigail Stone and her grandmother poet Ruth Stone. Shereceived her MFA from NYU’s creative writing program in poetry in 2009. She is the creator and co-curator of the Ladder Poetry Reading Series in New York City and is a regular contributor to Thethe Poetry Blog. Her chapbook of poetry, Someone Else's Wedding Vows, was published by Argos Books in the fall of 2010. Also known for her freelance illustrations, she is currently working on a manuscript exploring the mixed genre of poetry and image. She is also co-editor of a new small press, Monk Books. Her blog is known as Poetry Comics




R. W. Watkins is a Canadian poet, essayist, and longtime appreciator of comics and cartoons. He was the editor and publisher of Contemporary Ghazals, the world's first English-language journal dedicated to the style of Middle Eastern poetry from which it took its title. His poetry and literary criticism have appeared most notably in Lynx, RAW NerVZ Haiku, Haiku Canada publications, and Agha Shahid Ali's ghazals anthology Ravishing DisUnities. Also known for his work in Japanese styles of poetry, he has published three chapbooks of haiku, tanka and renga, including New England Country Farmhouse (2005), which has proven fairly popular with fans of an early Jodie Foster film from which it takes inspiration. In recent years, Watkins has shifted much of his attention to internet publishing (‘weblishing’); his MySpace site (http://www.myspace.com/rw_watkins_ghazals_haiku) contains samples from his chapbooks and links to some of his online work. Also, check out Of Tangents and Tantrums (http://nocturnaliris.googlepages.com/oftangentsandtantrums%3Ar.w.watkinsintervi), the outrageous, pissed-off-at-the-world interview Michele McDannold conducted with Watkins for the Outsider Writers website in the fall of 2007. The interview went unused for some mysterious reason....


Rob Wells is a co-editor of the blog Comics—On The Ration, which is where his review of X'ed Out originally appeared. His favourite comics include Gilbert Hernandez's Palomar installments, Frank Miller and Brian Michael Bendis's DareDevil stories, Stan Lee and Steve Dtiko's The Amazing Spider-Man, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby's The Fantastic Four, and Alan Moore's take on Swamp Thing. He resides in the UK, and considers most films to be rubbish.







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