Comments on Nick Barber's English Selection

From Hugh Taylor:
Thanks for this: good luck with this new venture.
And thanks for the book which I bought from Mary on Thursday night at the Radway. As with your previous book, a great selection of tunes with valuable background info.
Some observations that may (or may not!) be of interest -
1. Apart from the Playford tunes, very few (Radstock Jig is one) show signs of modality, and I wonder whether this is true of most English tunes. It could be one reason that many people playing say Scottish or Irish music find English music not very interesting or challenging. I wonder they don’t have more modality?
2. Fete du Village. There is a similar version in the Jackson H.S.J collection that treats the runs up in the B part rather differently.
3. Hills Fancy. This tune is also called Circassian, or Circassian Circle in the William Irwin collection. I think it was recorded as such by the Albion Band for the Lark Rise to Candleford production/CD. 
4. Roman Wall: Pete Coe always mentions that he got this from Adam Grey, a fiddler from Haydon Bridge. Similar-ish to Carlisle Races in the Carlisle Mss.
5. The Plane Tree: I’ve been confused for a while about this tune. I first came across the tune, similar to your version, in the first Blowzabella tune book entitled ‘a new French schottische’. It then appeared in your previous book as a jig by Undine Hornby, and I remember querying it with you. I’ve since found out that its a tune called Mominette written by Maxou Heintzen in 1981, and it was brought to the UK by Michel Pichon when he was playing with Paul James of Blowzabella. Where the Undine Hornby jig fits in I’m not sure.
6. French Waltz: This is La complainte du folkloriste and was written by Philippe Bruneau.

From Sue Robson:
The tune called "Mick's Tune" is properly named "Bigg Market Lasses"
Nick adds: Written by Chris Ormston, who notes: "Here's one I wrote in the early 1990s. While Bigg refers to barley, the place is now more of a cattlemarket! If you look at the abcs you will see that the sequence 'Beef' occurs in places!!"



From Chas Marshall:

Nick Barber’s English Selection: Alphabetical Index

 

Tune Name

Tune No.

Page No.

Tune Name

Tune No.

Page No.

Albert Farmer’s Bonfire Tune

34

18

Leeds Polka

72

33

Angela Mary Lee

7

8

Lemonville Jig

26

15

Ann Frazer McKenzie

59

29

Les Filles de mon Pays

95

40

Ball, The

76

34

Lilly Lips

19

12

Bang Upp

2

6

Little Burnt Potato

42

22

Basquet of Oysters

43

22

LNB Polka

70

32

Bath Hornpipe

48

25

London Hornpipe

21

13

Bellingham Boat

77

34

Lord Zouch’s Maske

6

8

Bloomsbury Market

79

35

Maiden Lane

63

30

Boys of School Hill

61

29

March in Bluebeard

68

31

Bus Stop

64

30

Mick’s Tune

91

39

Butcher’s Hornpipe

31

17

Miss Gayton’s Hornpipe

51

26

Chelmsford Assembly

9

9

Miss Menager’s Hornpipe

52

26

Chelsea Reach

8

8

Mittell’s Hornpipe

24

14

Clee Hill

56

27

Mount Hills

62

30

Coleford Jig

33

18

Mr Rew’s Polka

55

27

Cook Hornpipe

49

25

Never Again

94

40

Cotillion

3

6

Officer’s Polka

54

27

Cream Pot, The

1

5

Oldham Rant

11

9

Cuckolds All a Row

14

11

Plane Tree, The

81

36

Cuckoo’s Nest

50

25

Poolside Polka

46

24

Cumberland Waltz

83

36

Prince Albert’s Jig

28

16

Dennington Bell

47

24

Quarryman, The

25

15

Double Figure Eight

38

20

Radstock Jig

71

32

Draper’s Maggot

78

35

Red Lion

17

12

Duke of York’s Hornpipe

13

10

Reggish

93

40

Duke of York’s Quickstep

60

29

Robertson’s Hornpipe

80

36

East Bolden

58

28

Roman Wall

57

28

Feathers, The

5

7

Rosalie Prairie Flower

66

31

Fête du Village

23

14

Sadlers Wells

32

18

Flight, The

75

34

Said Too Much Already

82

36

Fourpence Halfpenny Farthing

74

33

Sally Sloane’s Jig

4

7

French Waltz

89

38

Shropshire Lass

69

32

Grand Chain

36

19

Soldiers’ Joy (Suffolk)

29

17

Grand Hornpipe

73

33

South Downs

92

39

Grimstock

15

11

Spanish Patriots

12

10

Hill’s Fancy

37

20

Stony Steps

22

13

Hole in the Wall

88

38

Sweeps Hornpipe

40

21

Holywell Hornpipe

53

26

Three Jolly Sheepskins

30

17

Honeymoon, The

10

9

Tom Tolley’s Hornpipe

41

21

Hudane

20

12

Tumblers Hornpipe

18

12

In the Toyshop

90

39

Tyskeren

45

23

Jour d’Été

86

37

Uncle Jim’s

27

16

Kirkgate Hornpipe

67

31

Valiant, The

44

23

Kurakin

65

30

Watson’s Hornpipe

35

19

L’Inconnue de Limoise

84

37

Westmorland

87

38

Lady’s Plaything

16

11

Will’s Way

39

21

Leaving of Lismore, The

85

37

 

 

 


Nick adds: 

Sorry everyone, of course this should have been included. Thanks, Chas!! 



From Alan Chard:

Very nicely produced, really easy to read the music, can I ask you a couple of things . . .

are there chords for No 38, Double Figure Eight, there are none shown and I'm not very good at adding them

 What software did you use for the music layout? It's a good size print that's easier to read than Musescore or Easyabc


Nick replies:
Sorry about the omission of the chords from Double Figure Eight. A great feature of this tune is the repeated A chords in the B music - they really build up to the start of the 4th line. I would suggest something quite simple like:
-|D---|Em-D-|D---|D---|
D---|Em-D-|D---|DAD:||
-|A---|A---|A---|A---|
D---|Em-D-|D---|DAD:||

The music was typeset in Code Finale and then imported into QuarkXPress to do the layout and text.

From Nick: A comment on Double Figure Eight:
Double Figure Eight was noted by Cecil Sharp on April 26th 1910, from the playing of William Sturch at Honington, near Ilmington in Warwickshire. You can read about the Sturch family, and their links with Ilmington and other local morris teams in Keith Chandler's essay at: http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/sturch.htm . 

The tune was picked up and recorded by the Old Swan Band - which is where most modern players have learnt it from.