Niagara County Spca

    niagara county
  • Niagara County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2000 census, the population was 219,846. The county seat is Lockport. The county name is from the Indian word Onguiaahra;meaning the straight or thunder of waters.
  • (Locksmith Buffalo NY)
    spca
  • Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
  • The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) is any of a number of animal welfare organizations whose operations include protecting and providing shelter to animals in danger.
  • Special Purpose Condition Assessment, or where an independent party is engaged to fully assess the corrosion on a tower by detailed measurement.
  • recognizes that dog bites are a serious public safety problem. Their interest in this issue relates directly to the goal of creating humane communities where people and animals enrich each other’s lives. However, the BC SPCA opposes breed banning as a strategy for achieving this goal.
niagara county spca
niagara county spca - Lockport 004,
Lockport 004, Niagara County 1908, New York, 1908 Fine-Art Reproduction
Lockport 004, Niagara County 1908, New York, 1908 Fine-Art Reproduction
Take a step back in time with an old view of Lockport 004 from Niagara County 1908 in New York. This map was originally published by Century Map Co. in 1908 and will be carefully reproduced on state of the art giclee printers.

Sourced from item number US17253 in the Historic Map Works online collection, this print will make the ideal gift for any historian or map buff. Many of the maps within the archive contain interesting details such as the old property owner names, building footprints, parcel boundaries, churches, schools, cemeteries, railroads and an endless list of other unique features. Use the zoom feature on the picture above to see the image in greater detail.

Baited Beaver (1201125-1075)
Baited Beaver (1201125-1075)
A Canadian icon, the beaver has graced many a stamp and coin, as well as providing the snooty upper class gentry with warm winter coats. A glorified rat, the beaver is essentially a pest, altering and flooding large tracts of land, gnawing down many a tree, as well as causing competition among the tree huggers for the remaining forest stands. Today I ran across (figuratively speaking) a beaver squatting in the middle of the road. Apparently it had been there for the past two hours, quite out of its element, and with no apparent do-gooder in sight, it was sure to assume the designation of road kill. Now I have been criticised in the past for “interfering” with nature by feeding some of my subjects, and probably will be after this story airs. When I stopped the Dodge Ram (with the Hemi) to grab an image, it became quite apparent that even if it didn’t die from blunt force auto trauma, it was on its last legs (no pun intended). It was quite weak and made no effort to avoid me or flee. I therefore (and quite heroically) picked it up by its tail and proceeded to a local pond with said animal. I hand fed him a number of willow branches over a period of one hour. With each branch, he became successively livelier (I confess that trusty Nikon D3S, having a mind of its own, was happily snapping away). Just when I felt that it might survive, the local SPCA arrived. Apparently my actions had been reported. After an instant assessment of Distemper by el SPCAer, a noose was thrown around its neck, and my new beaver buddy (who sure as heck did not object to the food, nor the occasional snap shot I had taken) was thrown into a cage half its size. Enquiring as to its future, I was informed that my new friend was heaven bound. No amount of cajoling could convince SPCA babe that this animal’s chance of survival had dramatically improved in the last couple of hours. I make no apology for having interfered with nature, my only regret was that I never took him to the next county..
Duncan at the South Grand Island Bridge in Buffalo, New York
Duncan at the South Grand Island Bridge in Buffalo, New York
Photo courtesy of Jacquie Walters NYSDEC with our thanks. Duncan was one of four chicks hatched at the Hamilton Sheraton Hotel nest site in 2008 to Surge and Madame X. A slow starter, he was the last of four to fledge that year but within 24 hours of his first flight, he was tackling his older sibling in the air and attempting to steal his food. He was often seen playing in puddles with his siblings after a rainfall and clearly loved the water. In 2010, Duncan arrived at the South Grand Island Bridge in Buffalo, New York where he took over the site from an unbanded male. The nest location is notoriously difficult to monitor as it is located on a wedge-shaped metal plate between two steel girders. That year, Duncan and his unbanded mate produced one offspring who was fortunate to survive fledging. After its intial fledge, the young male, dubbed Lucky, was spotted walking on a concrete piling below the nest box, approximately 10 feet above the river. It had fallen out of the nest, and was now in danger of falling into the rushing water. Indeed, within a few minutes the chick had slipped off the concrete and into the Niagara River. Technicians on site watched the chick being swept along by the current and coordinated a daring rescue with the help of a local marina. They were able to locate the bird and pull it from the river but it was not breathing. The rescuers quickly expelled the water from its body and the young bird was taken immediately to the Erie County SPCA where it made a full recovery. In the fall of 2010, Duncan and his mate received a new nest box installed on top of their preferred metal plate under the girders and in 2011, Duncan raised 3 more offspring setting his lifetime productivity total to date at 4 young.
niagara county spca
NUGGETS OF NIAGARA COUNTY HISTORY
There is more to Niagara County, New York, than challenging the awesome power of Niagara Falls in a barrel. Nuggets of Niagara County History, in fulfilling this realization, is a history book about the county and its formation from the powerful Iroquois Nation to the movers and shakers who made fortunes in developing a wilderness. This is not a dry history book full of dates and uninspiring events, but it emphasizes the unusual and the people who have made that history. Niagara County is inextricably entwined with such famous names of History as the Seneca Chiefs Corn Planter and Red Jacket, the Joncaires, explorer LaSalle and his faithful companion Father Hennepin the first Caucasian to write of the falls. There are tales of War of 1812 heroes, who fought the little known war across the Niagara River into adjacent Canada. Civil War heroes, too, came from Niagara County and even old Abe Lincoln received a perceived "bomb threat" from the County Seat of Lockport. There is the sad story of the greedy men who "swindled" the Iroquois out of most of their New York State land. These precious nuggets of history hold something intriguing for readers from throughout the land.