Grade 1


Storyline

The performance expectations in first grade help students formulate answers to questions such as: “What happens when materials vibrate? What happens when there is no light? What are some ways plants and animals meet their needs so that they can survive and grow? How are parents and their children similar and different? What objects are in the sky and how do they seem to move?” First grade performance expectations include PS4, LS1, LS3, and ESS1 Disciplinary Core Ideas from the NRC Framework. Students are expected to develop understanding of the relationship between sound and vibrating materials as well as between the availability of light and ability to see objects. The idea that light travels from place to place can be understood by students at this level through determining the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light. Students are also expected to develop understanding of how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs as well as how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive. The understanding is developed that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly the same as, their parents. Students are able to observe, describe, and predict some patterns of the movement of objects in the sky. The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; structure and function; and influence of engineering, technology, and science on society and the natural world are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. In the first grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Scope & Sequence


Unit 1  Unit 2Unit 3 Unit 4Unit 5  Unit 6
5-6 weeks
continues throughout year 
5-6 weeks 5-6 weeks
6-7 weeks 6-7 weeks   2-3 weeks
Patterns and Cycles of the Sun, Moon, and Stars  Parents and their BabiesEngineers Mimicking  Investigating Light and SoundEngineering with Light and Sound
 Show What We Know
1-ESS1-1
1-ESS1-2
1-LS1-2
1-LS3-1
1-LS1-1
K-2-ETS1-1
1-PS4-1
1-PS4-2
1-PS4-3

1-PS4-4
K-2-ETS1-2
K-2-ETS1-3
 Synthesize, Reflect and Apply what we learned

Note: * indicates integration of traditional content and engineering

Unit 1: Patterns and Cycles of the Sun, Moon, and Stars

This unit starts at the beginning of the school year, but continues throughout the school year. Students will make observations of the sun, moon, and stars. Students will collect the data, organize the data, and interpret the data to draw conclusions about the patterns they find. Students will use these patterns to make predictions about the movements and visibility of the sun, moon, and stars. Students will then use media resources to compare their predictions to prediction data that is available. This unit will focus on scientific thinking and skills.

Earth and Space Sciences

ESS1: Earth's place in the universe

 1-ESS1-1 Use observations of the sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include that the sun and moon appear to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; and stars other than our sun are visible at night but not during the day.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment of star patterns is limited to stars being seen at night and not during the day.]
 1-ESS1-2Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

[Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on relative comparisons of the amount of daylight in the winter to the amount in the spring or fall.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to relative amounts of daylight, not quantifying the hours or time of daylight.] 


Unit 2: Parents and their Babies

Students will read texts, use media, and make observations of plants and animals throughout the school year. Students will analyze behavior and observable characteristics to answer essential questions such as: How do the behaviors and traits of living things help them survive? How are families of living things similar? How are families of living things different? This unit will integrate English Language Arts and 21st Century Skills.

Life Sciences

LS1: From molecules to organisms: Structures and process

 1-LS1-2Read texts and use media to determine patterns in behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns of behaviors could include the signals that offspring make (such as crying, cheeping, and other vocalizations) and the responses of the parents (such as feeding, comforting, and protecting the offspring).]

LS3: Heredity: Inheritance and variation of traits

 1-LS3-1Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include features plants or animals share. Examples of observations could include leaves from the same kind of plant are the same shape but can differ in size; and, a particular breed of dog looks like its parents but is not exactly the same.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include inheritance or animals that undergo metamorphosis or hybrids.]



Back To Top

Unit 3: Engineers Mimicking

Students will be provided options of human problems, such as collecting trash or filtering water. Students will reflect on their observations from Unit 2 as well as additional sources of data. Students will use what they know about structures and functions of living things to design a solution to their human problem using an engineering approach. This unit will support student engagement in 21st Century Skills and engineering.

Life Sciences

LS1: From molecules to organisms: Structures and process

 1-LS1-1Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.*

[Clarification Statement: Examples of human problems that can be solved by mimicking plant or animal solutions could include designing clothing or equipment to protect bicyclists by mimicking turtle shells, acorn shells, and animal scales;stabilizing structures by mimicking animal tails and roots on plants; keeping out intruders by mimicking thorns on branches and animal quills; and, detecting intruders by mimicking eyes and ears.]

Engineering Design

ETS1: Engineering Design

 K-2-ETS1-1Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.


Back To Top

Unit 4: Investigating Light and Sound

Students engage in scientific investigations of light and sound. Students will discover some basic, observable properties of waves using sound and light waves. Students will participate in scientific approaches.

Physical Sciences

PS4: Waves and their applications in technologies for information transfer

 1-PS4-1Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of vibrating materials that make sound could include tuning forks and plucking a stretched string. Examples of how sound can make matter vibrate could include holding a piece of paper near a speaker making sound and holding an object near a vibrating tuning fork.]

 1-PS4-2Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects can be seen only when illuminated.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of observations could include those made in a completely dark room, a pinhole box, and a video of a cave explorer with a flashlight. Illumination could be from an external light source or by an object giving off its own light.] 
 1-PS4-3Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

[Clarification Statement: Examples of materials could include those that are transparent (such as clear plastic), translucent (such as wax paper), opaque (such as cardboard), and reflective (such as a mirror).]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include the speed of light.] 


Back To Top

Unit 5: Engineering with Light and Sound

Students will use an engineering approach to apply concepts of light and sound waves that they learned in Unit 4 to create a solution to problems of communication over distance. 

Physical Sciences

PS4: Waves and their applications in technologies for information transfer

 1-PS4-4Use tools and materials to design and build a device that uses light or sound to solve the problem of communicating over a distance.*

[Clarification Statement: Examples of devices could include a light source to send signals, paper cup and string “telephones,” and a pattern of drum beats.]

[Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include technological details for how communication devices work.]

Engineering Design

ETS1: Engineering Design

 K-2-ETS1-2Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.
 K-2-ETS1-3Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs. 


Back To Top

Unit 6: Show What We Know

This unit provides a chance for students to synthesize what they have learned, summarize on-going investigations, and integrate understanding gained throughout the year. 

Back To Top


Comments