Lamoille in the News


  • Merger of Johnson, Lyndon colleges proposed     By Tommy Gardner    By this time next year, the state colleges in Johnson and Lyndon could be one institution with two different campuses, based on a recommendation by the system’s chancellor.    The move could also help stem rising tuition costs, deal with stagnant state aid, expand educational offerings and improve the schools’ chances of a healthy future.    No worries, though, Badgers and Hornets faithful. There are no plans to combine your mascots into some pointy-nosed mammal with a stinger. Jeb Spaulding    Jeb Spaulding, chancellor of the Vermont State Colleges, delivered his merger recommendation to the system’s long-range planning committee on Wednesday, and is expected to brief the state colleges board of trustees today.Unifying Johnson State ...
    Posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:39 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Clarina Center says goodbye to director     By Caleigh Cross    Morrisville’s Clarina Howard Nichols Center, which combats sexual and domestic violence and abuse, will say goodbye to its longtime leader next month.    Executive Director Jane Ralph will step down Aug. 18.    “I wanted to move closer to family,” she said.     She’s headed to Great Barrington, Mass., and an organization called Construct, which works to provide affordable housing for people who face eviction or lack resources to maintain their homes.     In the last year, Construct sheltered 48 homeless adults and granted $42,000 in immediate financial aid to prevent homelessness.    Ralph feels her work with Construct will dovetail neatly with the work she’s done with Clarina.    “Addressing that need is important to survivors,” Ralph said ...
    Posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:39 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Elmore catches a tax break by Andrew Martin     No more projections or hypotheticals. After four merger votes, dozens of meetings and one approved budget, residents of the Elmore-Morristown school district are now seeing the concrete financial results of the merger they approved last winter. In Elmore, the local homestead property-tax rate dropped 37 cents from last year, to $1.366 per $100 of property value. Last year’s rate was $1.74 rate. That’s a savings of $374 on a house valued at $100,000.     As expected, Morristown tax rate went up slightly — by two cents, to $1.39. That adds $23 to the tax bill for a house valued at $100,000.     Elmore voters rejected the merger in November, but approved ...
    Posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:37 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Big turnout to confront local drug problems     By Tommy Gardner    Of the 175 or so people at a community discussion on heroin and opiate abuse last week, some are addicts, while some help treat them. Some of them are both.    Whether the drug of choice is prescription pills or alcohol, it often takes an addict to help one, because they’ve been down that road before, and even the cops know they can’t arrest away Vermont’s heroin epidemic.     And Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux wanted to make sure that addicts aren’t afraid to ask for help for fear of getting in trouble or shunned by society.    “The stigma associated with addiction is enough to stop people from reaching out,” Marcoux said.    How bad is ...
    Posted Jul 7, 2016, 11:35 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Rail trail already aids local businesses     by Andrew Martin     Sure, the local 17-mile stretch of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail is a great recreational path.    But it’s already showing it can be much more than that.    “I certainly believe it’s going to be a great economic benefit for the region,” said Duncan Hastings, the Johnson town manager. Hastings bikes the trail a great deal himself and says the number of people using it is growing steadily.     “It seems to be getting busier and busier,” he said.     The local section of trail, which opened officially in ceremonies last month, runs from Tenney Bridge in Morrisville through Hyde Park and Johnson to Cambridge Junction.     Businesses in all four towns report the people using the trail ...
    Posted Jul 7, 2016, 11:34 AM by Staff News & Citizen
  • Rail trail opens; boon for tourism 17.4-mile link in a route stretching 93 miles    by Andrew Martin        It’s here! After 20 years of waiting, the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail is open.    One of the open sections is right here in Lamoille County —  17.42 miles between Tenney Bridge in Morrisville and Cambridge Junction.    “It’s better than anything we could have imagined,” said state Sen. Rich Westman, R-Cambridge.    Westman has already made the trip from Cambridge to Lost Nation Brewery in Morrisville three times this year on his bicycle. PHOTO BY ANDREW MARTINBicyclists on the local stretch of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail cross a former railroad bridge in Johnson.    It’s hard not to feel some excitement — or maybe relief ...
    Posted Jun 30, 2016, 8:09 AM by Staff News & Citizen
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Merger of Johnson, Lyndon colleges proposed

posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:39 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    By Tommy Gardner

    By this time next year, the state colleges in Johnson and Lyndon could be one institution with two different campuses, based on a recommendation by the system’s chancellor.
    The move could also help stem rising tuition costs, deal with stagnant state aid, expand educational offerings and improve the schools’ chances of a healthy future.
    No worries, though, Badgers and Hornets faithful. There are no plans to combine your mascots into some pointy-nosed mammal with a stinger. 


Jeb Spaulding

    Jeb Spaulding, chancellor of the Vermont State Colleges, delivered his merger recommendation to the system’s long-range planning committee on Wednesday, and is expected to brief the state colleges board of trustees today.
Unifying Johnson State and Lyndon State colleges under one administration would result in a “larger and stronger college with two distinct campuses, each with its own identity,” but with a shared administration, budget, and a single accreditation, Spaulding says. Students at one campus could take classes at the other, sometimes using remote “telepresence” classrooms.
    “Higher education is being challenged by new modes of delivery, and we’re trying to make sure we’re not being left behind. I see this as a prudent move,” Spaulding said in a telephone interview this week. “What I would say to prospective students is, ‘Hey, you can get all the opportunities at both colleges as you could at either.’”
    Spaulding said that, despite strong efforts to spend thriftily and efficiently, the Vermont State Colleges still have the highest per-student operating costs in New England, because the smaller schools — Johnson’s and Lyndon’s enrollment fluctuates between 1,000 and 1,500 students — still have the administrative needs of larger colleges.
    “We get this question all the time. ‘Why do you have five of everything?’” Spaulding said.
    He was referring to the five higher-learning institutions that comprise the Vermont State Colleges: Johnson State, Lyndon State, Vermont Technical College, Community College of Vermont, and Castleton University. That’s five presidents in charge of five budgets, more than a dozen deans, and a smattering of administrators and their assistants at each place.
    There is also talk of collaboration between Vermont Tech and the multi-campus, pay-per-class Community College of Vermont, although a unification model like the one proposed for Johnson and Lyndon would be logistically difficult. 
    As far as Castleton, it just achieved university designation last year, and Spaulding said that, since it has at least 1,000 more students than the other state colleges, there’s really no need to change its governance model.

One team, two campuses
    Spaulding’s team has looked at the way other states — including Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Minnesota and Georgia — have worked to form alliances in their state colleges. 
    Today’s recommendation has been in the offing since January, but many nitty-gritty details remain to be worked out.
    One thing is clear, though. The Johnson and Lyndon campuses will retain their distinct identities. The Johnson Badgers will still be able to duke it out with the Lyndon Hornets in NCAA Division III contests. Johnson will still be able to keep its recent recognition by the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges.
    The unified Johnson and Lyndon institution — it’s still unclear what the name of the new college would be — will have one president. Elaine Collins, hired just last year as Johnson’s president, would oversee the unified college, with her support staff split between the two campuses. 
    The timing works out well, as Lyndon President Joe Bertolino is leaving to become president of Southern Connecticut State University.
    When Spaulding and Collins were hired as chancellor and college president at about the same time in early 2015, there was no notion that Collins might, two years later, be leading a college twice the size.
    “It’s a fairly big ask for Dr. Collins, but she is on board, and she sees the potential benefits for everybody,” Spaulding said.
    If the Vermont State College trustees approve Spaulding’s recommendation, there’s a lot to do in the next year — the larger unified college would become official July 1, 2017. The board was expected to assign Spaulding to come up with a much more detailed report and analysis by the end of September.
    “I don’t want to underestimate the heavy lifting we have ahead of us,” Spaulding said.

Money matters
    Spaulding is a longtime government official. He served eight years in the Vermont Senate, then was elected Vermont state treasurer, then became secretary of administration for Gov. Peter Shumlin. He also founded radio station 104.7 — WNCS, The Point — with his wife in 1977.
    Even before he became chancellor in January 2015, Spaulding was saying what his predecessor, Tim Donovan, had been saying for years: Vermont doesn’t fund its state colleges well enough.
    He pointed out last month that Vermont is 47th in the nation in its public support for its public colleges, and he has pushed the Legislature for more.
    With that in mind, Spaulding said combining Johnson and Lyndon into one entity would only increase the chances that the Legislature will increase funding for the Vermont State Colleges.
    “It sends a very positive message to the state that we’re interested in operating as efficiently as we possibly can,” he said.


This Week's Photos


NO SHORTAGES OF UMPIRES
PHOTO BY ANDREW MARTIN

Fans and coaches are all ready to make a call as Lamoille County’s Dylan Sautter 
slaps the tag on a St. Albans runner during the Little League All-Star District 3 title 
game. Sautter got the out, but St. Albans won the game, 5-0, to move on to the Vermont 
state tournament. Lamoille went 2-2 in the tourney, losing a heartbreaker to St. Albans 
earlier in the week, then falling again in the finals. More photos in Sports, Page 18.

Clarina Center says goodbye to director

posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:39 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    By Caleigh Cross

    Morrisville’s Clarina Howard Nichols Center, which combats sexual and domestic violence and abuse, will say goodbye to its longtime leader next month.
    Executive Director Jane Ralph will step down Aug. 18.
    “I wanted to move closer to family,” she said. 
    She’s headed to Great Barrington, Mass., and an organization called Construct, which works to provide affordable housing for people who face eviction or lack resources to maintain their homes. 
    In the last year, Construct sheltered 48 homeless adults and granted $42,000 in immediate financial aid to prevent homelessness.
    Ralph feels her work with Construct will dovetail neatly with the work she’s done with Clarina.
    “Addressing that need is important to survivors,” Ralph said, explaining that Clarina’s transitional housing program provides homes for victims.
    Ralph will take the reins at Construct on Sept. 1.
    Ralph didn’t expect to find another opportunity this quickly, but feels good about how Clarina’s doing.
    “The organization is in a really healthy place,” Ralph said. “We’re well-respected for the work we do. We’re seen as a good resource for innovative practice.”
    Ralph says one of the biggest strides the Clarina Howard Nichols Center made under her leadership was its 2014 decision to accept victims’ pets at the shelter, joining a nationwide initiative called Sheltering Animals and Families Together.
    The fate of a beloved pet is “something that holds people back from leaving” abusive relationships, Ralph said.
    The decision to accept pets is part of a larger cultural shift around the topic of domestic and sexual violence. Ralph says that, during her eight years with Clarina, she’s seen it move from a reactive approach, helping women and children who had already been abused, to a proactive approach, looking to start conversations about preventing violence in the first place. 
    Clarina’s commitment to providing transitional housing for victims who escape their situations showcases that approach, Ralph said.
    “We’re focused on a need for social change,” Ralph said. “It’s a shift in movement. We want to end violence.” 
    Ralph said that, by removing the incentive for violence — controlling the behavior of others — the organization and others like it nationwide can better fight what’s called a culture of abuse.
    “What’s most important is that, until we get the whole community involved and see that we all benefit when domestic violence ends, it will continue,” she said.
    Ralph said a social stigma against survivors makes it more difficult for them to seek help. Clarina believes that destroying that stigma will loosen the grip of domestic violence.
    Leaving, Ralph said, won’t be easy: “It’s really bittersweet. We have great staff and great volunteers. It’s a crazy time to leave.”
    “We wish Jane well. She leaves Clarina Howard Nichols Center a much stronger organization than when she started eight years ago,” said Tina Springer-Miller, who’s on the Clarina board and is a member of the committee that will hunt for Ralph’s replacement.
    Springer-Miller said Ralph “has built a team of skilled and dedicated advocates for victims of sexual and domestic violence, worked tirelessly to promote Clarina Howard Nichols Center’s mission within Lamoille County and beyond, and grown the services offered to survivors and the community at large. She has transitioned the organization’s culture from ‘rule-based’ to ‘survivor-based,’” ensuring that the needs and values of the people helped by the Clarina Howard Nichols Center will guide the organization’s decisions and services.
    Springer-Miller said new leadership should build on Ralph’s accomplishments while ensuring that the organization has a strong financial base through fundraising and grants. Those skills will top the wish list for Ralph’s successor. 
    “It is a challenging job to raise awareness of sexual and domestic violence, its impact on all members of a community and the ways in which a community can come together to help end violence,” Springer-Miller said. “The new executive director for Clarina Howard Nichols Center will need to be a strong and vibrant voice with survivors, community partners and the community at large.”
    The job is being advertised now on sites such as Indeed, craigslist and the Vermont Job Board.

Elmore catches a tax break

posted Jul 21, 2016, 8:37 AM by Staff News & Citizen

by Andrew Martin 

    No more projections or hypotheticals. After four merger votes, dozens of meetings and one approved budget, residents of the Elmore-Morristown school district are now seeing the concrete financial results of the merger they approved last winter. In Elmore, the local homestead property-tax rate dropped 37 cents from last year, to $1.366 per $100 of property value. Last year’s rate was $1.74 rate. That’s a savings of $374 on a house valued at $100,000. 
    As expected, Morristown tax rate went up slightly — by two cents, to $1.39. That adds $23 to the tax bill for a house valued at $100,000. 
    Elmore voters rejected the merger in November, but approved it in a December revote. Morristown voters said yes in the first go-round, then reaffirmed that decision in a January revote. 
    The new district’s $15,966,750 budget was resoundingly approved at its first annual meeting, held in May.
    The arrival of July means that the budget passed in May is now in effect, and it appears that predictions about how the merger would affect local taxes were quite accurate.
    “I’m pleased we were able to provide reliable projections to citizens to help inform their decision-making process,” said Tracy Wrend, the school superintendent. “I’m happy those savings were realized while we were still able to maintain high-quality learning opportunities for our students.” 
    School officials projected that, had Elmore not merged, its tax rate would have shot up to $1.89 per $100 of value for the current year. Instead, it’s at $1.36, a $500 difference on the tax bill for a $100,000 house.
    The common level of appraisal, which measures how closely a town’s appraisals match actual market value, accounts for the difference in the tax rates in each town. 
    According to Wrend, the slight increase in Morristown’s tax rate is due more to changes in the statewide school-funding formula than to any increase in local spending.

What the future holds
    Elmore’s tax benefits could ebb in the coming years.
    A one-time incentive grant of $150,000 that the new district received for merging will not be available next year. 
    And, Elmore’s annual small school grant of $40,000 will be phased out over the next three years. 
    Wrend isn’t overly concerned, though, because expenditures should be going down. Six Elmore students who were attending schools outside Morristown when the merger was approved, and were allowed to continue at those schools, will graduate next year, and their tuition fees will come off the books. 
    “The expected savings in tuition should offset the phasing out of those revenue sources,” Wrend said. 
    Since Elmore had no middle or high school of its own, it offered choice to its students. Most went to Peoples Academy in Morrisville, but others went to places such as Stowe High School and St. Johnsbury Academy.
    Going forward, only Elmore students already in grades 7-12 when the merger occurred will continue to have school choice. Other than this fall’s seniors, no Elmore class has more than four students opting for school choice.
    Younger students, and succeeding classes, will go to Peoples Academy for middle and high school. 

Big turnout to confront local drug problems

posted Jul 7, 2016, 11:35 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    By Tommy Gardner

    Of the 175 or so people at a community discussion on heroin and opiate abuse last week, some are addicts, while some help treat them. Some of them are both.
    Whether the drug of choice is prescription pills or alcohol, it often takes an addict to help one, because they’ve been down that road before, and even the cops know they can’t arrest away Vermont’s heroin epidemic. 
    And Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux wanted to make sure that addicts aren’t afraid to ask for help for fear of getting in trouble or shunned by society.
    “The stigma associated with addiction is enough to stop people from reaching out,” Marcoux said.
    How bad is the opiate problem in Vermont? Eric Miller, the U.S. attorney for Vermont, said his counterparts’ offices in other states typically devote 15 percent of their time prosecuting drug cases. His office devotes between 50 and 60 percent. 
    “That is a function of the size of the problem that we have in Vermont, but it’s also a function of our office’s commitment to playing a hopefully really positive role in fighting the problem,” Miller said at the discussion. “Y’all know we have a heroin problem here in Vermont.”


PHOTO BY TOMMY GARDNER
The overdose-reversing drug Naloxone.

    The problem may start in Central and South America, but it comes north through New York, Boston, Springfield, Mass., and into Vermont, which he called “the end of the line.” Here, Vermonters become the dealers or customers.
    “Nobody deals heroin alone,” Miller said. “It’s Vermonters who house drug dealers, who introduce them to the customers, provide them transportation, and use it themselves.” 
    And they become addicted to it. And now there’s fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 40 to 50 times more powerful than heroin, which makes it much more profitable and much more dangerous. 
    Marcoux, a former undercover agent with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency — he spent the late 1990s in Haiti, investigating drug trafficking and homicides — has been trying to draw attention to the county’s drug problems for years. 
    Last week’s meeting wasn’t meant to solve the issue in the 90 minutes allotted. Rather, Marcoux saw the forum as a way to get the ball rolling, to let the community know that most of the people helping stem the opiate tide don’t carry badges or guns. He said he hopes this is just the start of the conversation.
    “This is the first in maybe, what, one or two more meetings? I don’t know,” he said. 

Rural trend
    Marcoux said sheriff’s deputies revived a Johnson man last Monday who had OD’d on fentanyl, using the overdose-reversing drug Naloxone. 
    He had just bought about 40 doses of the drug less than two weeks earlier, and the man OD’d at 6 in the morning.
    And even police have to beware; an undercover officer Marcoux knows handled an empty bag of fentanyl, and she overdosed on just the residue coming through her skin, and had to be revived using Naloxone. 
    Vermont cities such as Rutland, Burlington and Brattleboro used to be the places where heroin was most rampant. But now, Miller said, the trade is moving into more rural areas, and that trend is reflected in the changes in police workloads.
    “I don’t think that there is any place in Vermont now that is better off or worse off when it comes to this epidemic,” Miller said. 
    “I fear that it is spreading out through the state, along with our population,” he said.
    There is a silver lining, though, Miller said. Vermont has done a better job than other states in coordinating police, doctors, lawyers, mental health therapists and church leaders. 
    He said “the holy grail of coordination” is to sit down on a weekly basis and identify the three prongs of the drug trade: the deliverer, the dealer and the customer.
    “There’s a recognition that there’s no way in the world that we’re gonna tackle this if we’re all kind of running off in our own directions,” he said. “We’ve all got to work more closely together.”

Addicts can recover
    Many people at last Wednesdays summit were familiar faces in that “holy grail” Miller cited: police and lawyers, doctors and treatment specialists, volunteers and professionals. 
    At least one of them was an addict.
    Trevor Foley, a Cambridge resident, seized the moment to come clean about getting clean. He said he wouldn’t have been standing there if it weren’t for the people in the room, and he included the police who arrested him for misdemeanors a couple of times in the past three years. 
    “You can get the help you need in this county, and you can recover,” Foley said. 
    Afterward, Foley said standing up was a way to bolster his confidence, and the huge applause he received helped validate his confession.
    Betsy Perez, a doctor at Copley Hospital in Morrisville, said her daughter, an opiate addict, was able to bounce back, but only after she hit a hard bottom. She “kept losing her wallet” and asking mom for money. She ended up going homeless in Burlington, because Morrisville doesn’t have a shelter. Her parents finally had her arrested. Now, the daughter is two years clean, living out of state with her new baby.
    “They do come through it. They come through it and become productive members of society,” she said. “My retirement fund is gone. Gone. But I don’t care, because she’s alive.”
Katie Marvin, a doctor at Stowe Family Practice, said her addict patients get so proud about things when they start the path to recovery that they call her up or stop in to share their progress.
    Said Marvin, “People come in all the time with these stories. I got my license! I got a girlfriend! I got a job!” 

Prescription for problem?
    Marvin is licensed to prescribe Suboxone for recovering addicts. 
    Suboxone is itself an opioid, and has its uses in pain treatment, but it is also prescribed to addicts who are trying to kick heroin or other opiates. Methadone is another drug used to help wean users off heroin, but it has to be taken at a clinic. 
    Marvin is keenly aware that Suboxone is also valued for its recreational uses, along with all manner of pills that she can prescribe. 
    Doctors prescribe a lot, literally tons, of tiny pills each year in Vermont — Marcoux said the state collected 5,094 pounds of prescription pills at its last drug take-back day in April.
    So what role do doctors play in adding to the problem? 
    They may have to take a page out of the old anti-drug ads and just say no. 
    Marvin said people will ask her for pain-killer prescription, and she’ll deny it, then get a phone call a half-hour later from another doctor saying the same person visited them.
    Perez thinks her daughter may have become addicted to painkillers as a teenager, after she broke both her legs. She doesn’t have much patience for doctors who give out 20 Percocets at a time. 
    “You all need to get in your doctors’ faces,” Perez said. 
    “Doctors aren’t gods. They’re going to need to start saying, ‘Why don’t you take a Tylenol?’”


This Week's Photos


ROYALTY ON THE FOURTH
PHOTO BY KAYLA FRIEDRICH

The Independence Day parade in Morrisville was well-suited to princesses, 
who took their place in the spotlight during the community’s festivities. 

Rail trail already aids local businesses

posted Jul 7, 2016, 11:34 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Andrew Martin 

    Sure, the local 17-mile stretch of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail is a great recreational path.
    But it’s already showing it can be much more than that.
    “I certainly believe it’s going to be a great economic benefit for the region,” said Duncan Hastings, the Johnson town manager. Hastings bikes the trail a great deal himself and says the number of people using it is growing steadily. 
    “It seems to be getting busier and busier,” he said. 
    The local section of trail, which opened officially in ceremonies last month, runs from Tenney Bridge in Morrisville through Hyde Park and Johnson to Cambridge Junction. 
    Businesses in all four towns report the people using the trail are also patronizing local stores and restaurants.
    At PowerPlay Sports in Morrisville, people have been stopping in to buy bike accessories or get a quick tuneup. 
    “People will take out their old bikes on the trail and realize they need something like a new, comfier seat,” said Robert Coates, a PowerPlay employee.
    Hank Glowiak at Chuck’s Bikes in Morrisville is doing a lot of repairs to older bikes. People are bringing in their old bikes, many of which haven’t been ridden in years, because they want to take them along the trail.
    The same thing was happening last year, Glowiak said, even though the trail wasn’t officially open yet. People couldn’t wait to get out there.
    Bike rentals have spiked at both businesses, even though neither has boosted rental advertising.
    “We literally didn’t have any more bikes to rent out on Sunday,” Coates said. PowerPlay owner Caleb Magoon has a dozen bikes available for rent, up from prior years, but all 12 were out on the trail most of the weekend.
    “We must have had 15 people call over the weekend asking if we rented bikes,” Coates said.
    The trail has also sparked a new business: Lamoille Valley Bike Tours. The mobile business, whose route includes Cambridge, Johnson and Morrisville, rents electric bikes to trail-goers looking for a tour of the Lamoille Valley who’d like a little help powering the pedals.
    Lost Nation Brewery says it has been a hot destination for bikers and hikers using the trail. The brewery, which has an indoor restaurant and taproom as well as a beer garden, sits right on the trail in Morrisville. People started trickling in last year and that trickle has turned into a river. 
    “We get a lot of bike groups during the week and then a lot of families on the weekends,” said Meg Loscomb, the manager at the brewery. 
    Most of the people stopping at local businesses are from other parts of Vermont and came to this area to enjoy the trail. Some out-of-staters are checking in as well. 
    The economic benefits of the trail should be just beginning. According to John Mandeville, executive director of the Lamoille Economic Development Corp., studies show the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail should bring in about $2 million per year from tourists once things really get rolling and word of the trail starts to spread.

Attracting visitors
    Local governments and organizations are looking for ways to bring rail trail users into downtowns and villages. 
    The Lamoille Economic Development Corp. has helped fund publication of maps and brochures that will be available at trailheads and businesses in Cambridge, Hyde Park, Johnson and Morrisville. 
    Trailheads are already operating in three of the towns and Hyde Park is pursuing a permit for one there.
    Several revitalization efforts in Hyde Park Village are tied to the rail trail. A new sidewalk between Depot Street Extension, where the trailhead’s located, and Main Street was completed a few years ago. The town and village are working together on general pedestrian improvements, and just finished a study on what it will take to link the rail trail and village to Lamoille Union High School. 
    All four towns have either already installed or plan to install signs that will direct people from the village to the trail and vice versa.
    We are pretty excited,” Hastings said. The trail is already helping to boost the local economy, and he expects much more when the full trail route is completed between Swanton and St. Johnsbury, all the way across the top of Vermont.  
    “Once it’s all connected, 93 miles, I think that’s when we will really start to see some benefits,” he said. “I think it will be pretty staggering in terms of how many people are going to use it.”

Rail trail opens; boon for tourism

posted Jun 30, 2016, 8:09 AM by Staff News & Citizen

17.4-mile link in a route stretching 93 miles


    by Andrew Martin
    
    It’s here! After 20 years of waiting, the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail is open.
    One of the open sections is right here in Lamoille County —  17.42 miles between Tenney Bridge in Morrisville and Cambridge Junction.
    “It’s better than anything we could have imagined,” said state Sen. Rich Westman, R-Cambridge.
    Westman has already made the trip from Cambridge to Lost Nation Brewery in Morrisville three times this year on his bicycle. 


PHOTO BY ANDREW MARTIN
Bicyclists on the local stretch of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail 
cross a former railroad bridge in Johnson.

    It’s hard not to feel some excitement — or maybe relief — that the trail is becoming a reality after nearly two decades of planning, searching for funds, and question upon question.
    Ceremonial ribbon-cuttings were held last Thursday at trailheads in Morrisville, Hyde Park, Johnson and Cambridge. 
    Actually, both local residents and tourists jumped the gun. People were already using the local section of rail-trail last year, while work was still going on, and it opened for public use this spring.
    Earlier, a 15.35-mile stretch between Danville and St. Johnsbury had opened.
    “We are very excited to see these two sections, which are about one-third of the entire trail, done and open,” said Cindy Locke, executive director of the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers. Locke’s organization is overseeing work on the trail, which in winter is used by snowmobilers, cross-country skiers, snowshoers and dog mushers.
    Right now, it’s being used by bicyclists, walkers, horseback riders — lots of uses that don’t involve motors.
    Rail trails are great ways to get into unseen country. The trail, built on a former railroad line, runs along stretches of the Lamoille River, through forests, on the edges of towns — and it’s really flat, with a fine-gravel surface, so any bicyclist can go for miles.
    The route involves more than 50 bridges and runs through more than 900 wetland areas, great places to see birds and other wildlife.
    Eventually, the rail trail will stretch 93 miles across the top of Vermont, from St. Johnsbury to Swanton, running through 18 towns in five counties. 
    It will be the longest rail trail in New England, and is expected to be a great boon for recreation — and for tourists.
    “Everyone is struck by the number of users” on the Danville-St. Johnsbury stretch, evidence of how popular the trail is likely to be, said Jane Kitchel, a state senator from Caledonia County.
    Communities along the trail are mobilizing to cater to the tourists who are expected to come.
    The trail follows the route of the Lamoille Valley Rail Road, founded in 1877 and shut down in 1994. It was a scenic train ride, dubbed “The Covered Bridge Line,” and leaf-peeper excursions for fall foliage viewing ran into the 1970s.
    The state government saw the potential value of transforming the former rail line into a year-round recreation trail, and in 1997 VAST stepped forward to lead the effort. The railroad tracks have long since been ripped up.

Quick-stepping
    While years went into planning, the actual work of making the trail a real thing began in 2014 and has moved along faster than expected. 
    There were a few troublesome spots — mostly the bridges, cattle passes and old stone box culverts on the trail. Over the last 150 years, those structures have been replaced at different times with different materials and techniques, and “some of them required more work than was initially anticipated,” said Shane Prisby, rail trail project manager. 
    Another setback occurred just east of Morrisville: A section of completed trail was washed out by a landslide. However, workers were able to make repairs quickly and take steps to prevent similar problems in the future. 
    One of the next big projects involves the Cambridge Junction railroad bridge across the Lamoille River. Repairs had been planned on the bridge, then an ice floe this winter damaged one of the piers. The Vermont Agency of Transportation took emergency action to keep the bridge from falling into the river, and VAST plans to repair the bridge and replace the wooden piers with steel ones. 
    All that work should be done this year. It’s likely to chew up all the remaining federal money earmarked for the trail, but other funding is available. 
    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., helped to land $5.2 million in federal money for the rail trail. Part of his pitch was that the rail trail will create jobs in a part of Vermont that badly needs them.
    VAST has promised to cover 20 percent of the rail trail’s cost, and persuaded the federal government to allow in-kind donation — volunteer labor and materials, for instance — to count as local contributions to the project.
    Sens. Westman and Kitchel worked together on a bill passed last month that will provide up to $1.4 million in matching money from the state for trail work. 
    That money will help finish the Cambridge Junction Bridge project and to work on an 11-mile stretch from Sheldon west to Swanton. In Swanton, a 1-mile stretch of the trail has been open for about three years — a tantalizing taste of what’s to come.

Fund drive
    VAST is about to launch a fund drive to raise the money needed to match the $1.4 million state allocation. How fast the rest of the rail trail is completed depends on how quickly permits can be obtained and how well fundraising goes.
    “The only way this project will be successful is with the support of the community,” Prisby said. “Please donate to this amazing trail.” 
    Other segments of the trail in Lamoille County run from Tenney Bridge east into Wolcott, and from Cambridge Junction west toward Sheldon. Another phase, in East Hardwick and Greensboro Bend, will link the eastern and western portions of the trail.
    Locke estimates it will take between $10 million and $12 million more to complete the 93-mile trail. VAST is working on state and federal sources of money, as well as private donations.
    VAST is also looking for volunteers to maintain trail sections that have already been completed. The Friends of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail has volunteered for some of that work. Volunteers can do small things, such as pick up trash along the trail, or bigger things, such as joining organized workdays. 
    “There are many opportunities to help out at different levels of commitment to fit into anyone’s busy schedule,” Prisby said. Anyone interested in volunteering or donating can contact Prisby at shane@vtvast.org.


This Week's Photos

Women teach women to shoot

posted Jun 30, 2016, 8:08 AM by Staff News & Citizen

Vermont in the vanguard; no pushback from violence

By Kayla Friedrich

    All across Vermont, women are dressing up and going out — for a day at the shooting range. 
    Last Saturday, six women participated in a ladies-only firearms clinic at the Lamoille Valley Fish & Game Club in Morrisville.
    Women on Target clinics have been sponsored by the National Rifle Association across the country since 2000. The premise: Women teaching women how to handle different types of firearms.


PHOTO BY KAYLA FRIEDRICK
Leah Stewart, an instructor at the Women on Target clinic held last Saturday, 
demonstrates the proper stance and grip for shooting a 9mm handgun. The 
ladies-only clinic was held at the Lamoille Valley Fish & Game Club in Morrisville. 

    However, most of the courses have been taught by a combination of men and women, for lack of female instructors.
    Now, Vermont is leading the charge; it has the only program taught and run entirely by women. 
    Diane Danielson, National Women on Target coordinator and creator of the program, was so impressed by the Vermont instructors that she flew out for a visit during last week’s clinic. Before she leaves July 2, all instructors will be NRA-certified to teach four categories: rifle, pistol, and personal protection inside and outside the home.
    “This is my first trip to Vermont, and I am thrilled to be here,” Danielson said. “A few other states have groups of women instructors, but not as put-together as this one.”
    For the last four years, Clint Gray, a retired Vermont State Police lieutenant, had been teaching the ladies-only shooting clinics in the Green Mountain State alongside his wife, Mary. They were the program’s only instructors in Vermont, and traveled all over the state to teach the course.
    This year, though, the Grays turned the reins over to Marsha Thompson, a retired U.S. Army master sergeant, and her team of five assistant instructors — Ellen Jareckie, Joyce Hottenstein, Leah Stewart, Shauna McIsaac-Healey and her mother, Kay McIsaac-Healey. 
    In her 39 years in the Army, Thompson spent 10 as the only female marksmanship instructor for Vermont. After she retired two years ago, Thompson wanted to continue to teach the sport. Now, she’s recruiting more women to become instructors. 
    “Eventually, I want to have four groups of female trainers to cover different locations throughout the state so we all don’t have to travel every weekend,” Thompson said.
    The program teaches the basics of grip, safe handling, stance, aiming and shooting. Each course varies in the types of guns being taught.
    Last Saturday, the women started with .22 caliber long rifles, then moved on to shoot .22 cowboy-action and double-action revolvers, semiautomatic .22 pistols, semiautomatic 9mm pistols and .38 special revolvers. 
    The Women on Target clinic also had AR-15s and .223 caliber rifles on site, but there wasn’t enough time left to shoot them. 
    Even after the Orlando shooting June 12, when a gunman used a Sig Sauer MCX .223 caliber rifle to kill 49 people and wound more than 50, the women haven’t heard any criticism about teaching these semiautomatic weapons.
    “Often we teach women how to handle the AR-15s or the .223s as well,” Stewart said. “And we haven’t had any pushback. There is nothing wrong with AR-15s or .223s. It’s all in the shooter’s mindset, and how you use it. I think it’s good for people to know how to use these guns properly.”
    “The only difference between these guns and other rifles is caliber,” Thompson said. “Any semiautomatic rifle can hold a clip with the same amount of rounds as an AR. So if the AR is going to be considered an assault rifle because of magazine size, a regular rifle technically would be too. If someone wanted to, they could even outfit a regular rifle with a drum mag.”  
    Stewart said that pushing more gun control is a copout. The politicians want to blame the firearm, rather than looking at the larger issue of mental illness.
    “Banning a certain gun because it was used in a shooting is like killing all alligators because one killed a child,” she said.
    All guns used in the clinic are on loan from the Vermont Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs. At the end of the summer, all guns will be cleaned and returned to the federation. The NRA supplies the ammo, targets, and eye and ear protection. 
    Any woman can take the course as many times as she wants, but right now, each course is going to cover the same information, so Danielson encourages women to bring their friends.
    “If you want to continue, bring friends, and help us grow the program,” Danielson said. “Or you can also join us as an instructor and take the instructors’ course.”
    Eventually, the clinic would like to offer courses to teach the next step. Once women learn to shoot, they should be taught how to fit the right gun to them, methods of concealed carry and how to clean their own guns, so they can be self-sufficient in the sport of shooting as well as in home protection.
    For a full list of courses being taught this summer, visit the “Women on Target by Vermont Women” Facebook page. 

Petition forces revote on school plan

posted Jun 30, 2016, 8:03 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    by Andrew Martin 

    It’s official: There will be a revote on a $9.8 million school project that Hyde Park residents approved by just five votes, 261-256, on June 7.
    Speculation about a revote began as soon as the votes were counted.
    The project involves extensive repairs and renovations, and some outright replacement, of Hyde Park Elementary School.
    A petition for a revote was taken out soon after the June vote, and a group of residents began an aggressive campaign to collect the signatures needed to force a new vote. Volunteers manned a station outside the town offices after work on weekdays to collect signatures, numerous social media posts were made, and Michael Ryan, who circulated the petition, wrote a News & Citizen column explaining why he thinks the school project can be done for millions fewer dollars.
    The petition needed the signatures of 204 registered voters in Hyde Park, 10 percent of the voter checklist. 
    When the petition was turned in Monday to Town Clerk Kimberly Moulton, it had 312 signatures.
    The Hyde Park School Board must now select a date for a revote. No board members were available before press time to comment, but Moulton is recommending a revote on Tuesday, Aug. 9 — the date of the Vermont primary election to narrow the field of candidates for governor, lieutenant governor, the Legislature and other major offices.
    First, it’s far cheaper to hold one election, rather than two. Second, holding the school revote in conjunction with the primary election likely means many more voters will participate in the decision than if the school issue were the only question on the ballot.

Finances the focus in Democratic debate

posted Jun 23, 2016, 9:15 AM by Staff News & Citizen

Candidates for governor face off

    By Stanley Blow III
    The three Democratic candidates for governor tackled all the major issues at a debate Monday night, except one big one — guns.
    When Matt Dunne, Peter Galbraith and Sue Minter took the stage at Crossett Brook Middle School in Duxbury, Jon Ciappa of Waterbury Center hoped they would touch on the hot-button issue of gun control, but they didn’t.
    The question wasn’t in the cards — the index cards on which audience members wrote their questions for the candidates.


PHOTO BY GORDON MILLER

Waiting for the call to start Monday’s debate at Crossett Brook Middle School are the three 
Democratic candidates for governor: Peter Galbraith, at left, Sue Minter and Matt Dunne.

    Ciappa and Brenda Henderson, a voter from Warren, were disappointed. 
    Gun control jumped to the forefront of public debate on June 12, when Omar Mateen opened fire in a gay nightclub in Orlando, killing 49 and wounding 53.
    Minter did say she favors stricter, “common sense” gun laws, such as universal background checks for gun owners, but the discussion went no deeper than that.
    Ciappa said he was glad the candidates spoke about health care and education, which are high priorities for him.
    For Henderson, taxes, health and the economy topped her list.
    On economy and taxes, the candidates were asked how they would solve the state government’s perennial budget gap with finite money and facing significant challenges.
    Galbraith responded with a question — why would anybody want to do business in Vermont? The short answer: Because it’s a great place to live. It’s not because of low taxes — New Hampshire has that edge — and it’s not because of high wages.
    Vermont has a high quality of life and cares about natural beauty and the environment, as well as public services, Galbraith said.
    “These things cost money,” he said. “We cannot have a discussion about maintaining quality of life in Vermont and then ignore the question of how we raise the money to do it.”
    Galbraith then hinted at a plan he unveiled the next day: He wants to eliminate more than $45 million in tax breaks that benefit the wealthy and use that money to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and offer free tuition to Vermont’s state colleges for in-state students.
    Minter focused on her work developing Invest Vermont and Innovate Vermont. InvestVT focuses on roads, bridges and other infrastructure that need fixing throughout the state, and recognizing that government projects can help stimulate the private economy. 
    InnovateVT is about stimulating Vermont’s 21st-century economy through technology and green businesses, helping to breathe new life into the state’s economy.
    As for the budget, Minter said that, while she was the state transportation secretary, she dealt with $600 million worth of questions every year. 
    “I’ve made many, many difficult decisions every year about what we do and how we prioritize,” she said. “It is about prioritization, and it’s about how we support our workforce.”
    Minter said the Agency of Transportation actually saved money by hiring more state employees.
    “We’ve proven that by looking at the cost of hiring contractors versus employees,” she said.
    Minter also said VTrans became more efficient under her watch, with a sharp reduction in how long it takes to build or repair bridges, for instance.
    Dunne poked fun at Galbraith’s ideas: “Peter has done incredible work on behalf of the state as part of his campaign by going through the work that he’s done. He would make an excellent in-house auditor for the next governor.”
    Dunne said the state has been struggling year in and out to balance its budget.
    “We’ve raised taxes; we’ve cut programs for the most vulnerable and cut frontline workers, and yet next year come back to the same thing,” Dunne said. “It’s simply not sustainable.”
    Rethinking the tax code would help, he said, but health-care costs are “eating us alive.” 
    Every day, the cost of health care climbs about $60,000, Dunne said. Reducing those increases will take some trust, and “part of that is going to be fixing the damn website,” he said, referring to the chronically troubled Vermont Health Connect portal to the state’s health insurance exchange. “We have already spent over $200 million on a failed website.”
    Dunne, a former Google executive, said his background in information technology would help fix that.
    Minter, Galbraith and Dunne are competing for the Democratic Party nomination in the primary election Aug. 9. The winner will face off against one of the Republican candidates, Phil Scott or Bruce Lisman, in the general election Nov. 8


This Week's Photos


A DAY OF CELEBRATION
PHOTOS BY ANDREW MARTIN

Allison Kittell, above, hugs her mom during the Peoples Academy graduation. Below,
 Declan Stefanski  gets a fist bump as he collects his Lamoille Union High School diploma.

Morristown, planners working out differences

posted Jun 23, 2016, 9:14 AM by Staff News & Citizen

    By Tommy Gardner

    At a largely tension-free annual meeting last week, the Lamoille County Planning Commission quickly moved through its business before honoring community members both living and dearly-departed.
    With tensions between Morristown and the regional planning body still simmering — town officials think the commission is interfering in town business — an otherwise rote election removed the town’s water and light department manager from the LCPC board, and sent town officials to their social media pages. 
    It appears a week later, however, that both sides are going to try and find some middle ground.
    “Frankly, I’ve had it with copies of tweets and emails. It’s a bunch of hurt feelings,” selectman Eric Dodge said this week.
    Craig Myotte, previously one of the at-large county directors, didn’t make the cut this time, as eight people vied for five open seats. Two other county directors from Morristown decided against running again.
    “The Lamoille County Regional Planning Commission Board just voted the general manager of our regional utility (MW&L) off the board #VT,” Todd Thomas, Morristown’s zoning director, Tweeted right after the meeting. 
    Tricia Follert later took to Twitter, too, calling the outcome a “huge mistake.”

New county directors
    Lamoille County Planning Commission has 18 members assigned by its member towns, with larger towns getting more members. 
    It also has five at-large county directors, and eight people came to last Tuesday’s annual meeting hoping to get one of them.
    Hyde Park resident Caleb Magoon, the current vice chairman of the board, was re-elected as a county director, as was fellow Hyde Parker Valerie Valcour. Newly elected directors are Ralph Monticello of Eden, Howard Romero of Johnson and Linda Martin of Wolcott. 
    Joining Myotte as also-rans were Roy Marble of Morristown and Brian Albarelli of Cambridge; both have previously been board members. 
    Martin, the Wolcott town clerk and a longtime member of the Vermont House, spoke ahead of the vote of the importance of regional planning. It’s so important to Wolcott that she sponsored a bill that gives more power to regional commissions to help smaller towns. 
    “Our small towns are important to the region, too,” Martin said. 
    Romero, a freelance industrial designer and photographer, is a past Jim Marvin Award winner (see related story) for designing the Springer Miller building in Stowe. Romero said he likes how Lamoille County Planning Commission gets done, as opposed to some select boards that “sit on issues” for years.
    “I don’t put up with obstructionists very well,” he said.

Olive branch?
    Monday at the Morristown Select Board meeting, both sides vowed to put aside “hurt feelings” for the greater good of the county. 
    Chairman Bob Beeman proposed hiring a mediator to help communication between the commission staff and the town officials.
    But Dodge said that would be a waste of money.
    “I think we have adults that work here for the town, and LCPC has a fine staff,” he said. “We are all professionals, and I think we need to come together at a meeting and begin to move forward through this.”
    The board ultimately assigned town administrator Dan Lindley to meet one-on-one with Tasha Wallis, executive director of the planning commission, hoping they can figure out some middle ground.
    “There’s a role for the town and a role for us. Maybe we need to review that and establish what those are for each body and individual,” Wallis said. 
    Lindley agreed, saying, “We all have our roles, and everyone understanding what those are and what the boundaries are would be a tremendous help to everybody involved.” 

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