About Archie J. Inger

INTRODUCTION

To narrate the events which led up to the writing of this booklet would be long, and to most people would be tiresome. However, I believe that a few remarks are necessary.

Early in life I disapproved of all things pertaining to religion. I worshipped what I saw highest in men and believed that if indeed an eternity existed (a thing which I doubted) man there would possess a conscience which would cause him to judge and punish his own wrongdoing, even as it does with all enlightened men here upon the Earth. I had no fear of devils, no reverence for angels, nor for God, on the ground that I knew nothing of either. If to reach Heaven meant eternal bondage to creed and dogma, I preferred my freedom while upon the earth, taking my chances hereafter.

But in some of these respects I have changed my mind. For I discovered a TRUTH which revealed to me that, however greatly I desired mental freedom, I was not free. Freedom is the gem of existence. How foolish I was to think that I possessed that gem! I am now convinced that the condition of a man who is firmly fixed in his own individual opinions, is quite as sad as the condition of a Catholic or a Methodist or of any other denomination who is bound to his respective creed. Fixed opinions are always the enemies of Truth, whether they are fixed by an individual for himself; by a church for its members; or by a country for its people. We all possess so little truth that our philosophy is generally maintained by mere combativeness alone; while a truth will not only stand upon its own merits, but will grow. I, for one, found it so. Having created a philosophy of life for myself, I was satisfied until friends and relatives no longer opposed my believing as I pleased.

The strife of maintaining my opinions, which had kept them alive, ceased, leaving me with an inward longing still unsatisfied. I now think it wrong that any man should maintain his opinions by force; but rather, when he finds his opinions are not supported by facts, he should be the first to abandon them. Why should we feel sure of ourselves?



The atheist will say that to believe in a God is folly. But is it not equally foolish to declare that there is no God? None of us know. This would seem to be the safest attitude, were it not that they who make it generally believe the exact opposite of themselves. But if we do not know, then we are not yet free. Thus we see that He was wise after all who said: ‘Ye shall know the TRUTH and that will make you free."

It is simply the desire to know the Truth that I wish to inspire in the reader’s mind before entering into a perusal of this interpretation of John’s Revelation. It was, in all likelihood, the desire to know the Truth which made possible the events leading up to the writing of this revelation. For I believe that under the dominance of any other desire it could not have been received.

The Truth regarding the future existence of man dawned upon me in a manner more strange than any dream. It was indeed the dawn. The dawn of a new day following a night of darkness. The dawn of a new life; and it came when nothing less could have made this life seem worthwhile. In the hour of disbelief and rebellious despair, a strange experience visited the house of my mother and myself in which for three weeks we communed with Angels. To us, the almost impossible, the miraculous, the proof of an eternity came. Not dogma, nor doctrine, but actual experience with the invisible released our souls from the bondage of doubt and perplexity, giving us the freedom which comes from knowing.

During this great experience a creedless doctrine was revealed; a doctrine as absolute as evolution, yet as free from boundaries as the universe; and as close to the heart and soul of man as the sun is to the blooming plant, holding within its sweet embrace the privilege of knowing; each man for himself.

During this marvelous revelation the writing of a book was predicted. Three years later the book was written, being revealed to me in the form of a vision from Heaven. The Christ appeared and told me things which I recorded, crudely perhaps, being unskilled in letters; nevertheless accurately, and in a manner pleasing to Him who revealed it.

After a volume had been completed, and which was published under the title, "The Revealed Translation of John’s Revelation," which contained the spiritual significance of that part of the Scriptures; there followed a new revealment containing the historical comparisons between the symbols of John’s revelation, and history itself. These I was commanded to withhold until I should receive permission from The Spirit to publish them. This permission I now have, and will publish them that all who desire may read. After this introduction is concluded I assume no further credit but write as if I were the Christ speaking, for I am merely repeating His words as nearly as it is possible for me in my weak way to repeat them.

In this interpretation no new doctrine is expounded. Its purpose should be as appealing to the agnostic as to the religionist--and probably more so. But let it be understood also that no matter in what direction it may move the reader, its intention, or intended purpose, is not to inspire any man to seek God through any of the religious channels existing under the head of Christianity today. However, it is hoped that all who read will be convinced that God knew the future, and communicated it to mankind through the instrumentality of John, "The Divine." The future, being in this manner revealed, only proves that wisdom can be imparted to man from the eternal side of life. If this fact is established in the reader’s mind, then the object of this interpretation has been accomplished.

Many of the historical comparisons which are made within these pages have been made before by students who have endeavored to reconcile history and prophecy. But while they have discovered some true comparisons, they have added so many untrue ones, and have injected such a variety of absurd religious doctrine that the reader has become lost within a maze; while the more discriminating have become disinterested. Therefore, I once more state that the object of this interpretation is to prove that God did cause a communication to take place through John from the eternal side of life. This being once honestly admitted, incurs a responsibility. What is it? That is for each soul to discover, but it is certainly not discovered for him within this little volume unless he has eyes that see beyond the flesh. However, I may add, he who finds his responsibility will not discover it by reading alone but by the manner of his life; and with this I commend this interpretation to all seekers for TRUTH.



ARCHIE J. INGER



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