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Yard Sign Campaign

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Sign #1

Across the US, most teens believe prescription drugs are easily accessible from their parents’ medicine cabinet.  Remember to lock up prescription pain pills when they are in use the home and dispose of leftovers when you are done with them.  Medication lock boxes are readily available online for under $30, and safes or strong-boxes are good alternatives for medication storage.


SOURCE:

Partnership for a Drug Free America - 2009 Parents and Teens Attitude Tracking Study

 

 
 
 
Sign #2


Always practice Safe Use, Disposal, and Storage of Prescription Medications.  For more information, please visit our pages:

SAFE Use
SAFE Storage
SAFE Disposal



















Sign #3

Salt Lake City Residents report that doctors explain the risks of sharing prescriptions less than half the time.  Sharing medications can lead to loved ones having bad reactions, serious side effects, overdosing, and also problems with the law.  It is a felony to share prescription narcotics (pain pills) or to possess prescription narcotics without a current prescription. 


SOURCE: 
University of Utah Neighborhood Action Coalition – Salt Lake City Prescription Pain Medication Telephone Survey 2010.  
Utah Controlled Substances Act






Sign #4

The average age at prescription pain pill overdose death is 42 for zipcodes 84116 and 84104.  In the west Salt Lake City neighborhoods, deaths ranged from 16-61 years of age.  Deaths occur about equally in women and men.  Additionally, deaths occur in all income brackets, ethnicities, races, and education levels.  No one is exempt from the risk of prescription drug overdose.


SOURCE:

Data extracted from Utah Department of Health and Medical Examiner’s System –Utah (MESU) database (Salt Lake County Accidental and Undetermined 2003-2009)




Sign #5


Most people spend less than 2 minutes talking to their doctor about the risks of prescription pain medication.  What information does your doctor offer to you when he/she prescribes you prescription pain pills?  With prescription pain pills there is a risk of physical dependency, addiction, and serious side effects.  Also, it is very risky to share pain medications (see #3 above).  Prescription pain pills become less effective after their expiration dates, so dispose of your medications at local police stations to protect your family and the environment (see #9 below). 


SOURCE: 
University of Utah Neighborhood Action Coalition – Salt Lake City Prescription Pain Medication Telephone Survey 2010.





Sign #6

In the year 2009, 265 people died from Prescription Drug overdose.  Only 244 deaths occurred from Motor Vehicle Crashes. This trend started in 2008 and has continued in 2010. 

News articles that talk about the problem:

KSL - Prescription Overdose: Top Cause of Injury Death in Utah

SLTrib - Prescription drug abuse increase in Utah


SOURCES:
UDOH – Utah Health News
Utah Department of Public Safety – Highway Safety Office


Sign #7

In Utahis one of the top states in the nation for the non-medical use of prescription medications.  In the last 10 years, deaths from prescription drug overdose have skyrocketed. 

Always follow the advice from your doctor and directions written on the label of any prescription medications you are taking.  Never mix prescription pain pills with alcohol (not even one pill and one drink!) or other depressants such as sleeping pills unless directed by your doctor. 

As always, tell your doctor of any substances you are taking including over-the-counter medications, supplements and vitamins, and other drugs.  See our Resources page for signs and symptoms of prescription pain pill dependence, addiction, and overdose. 

Always call 911 and stay with the victim if you suspect overdose.


SOURCES:
UDOH – Utah Health News
Utah Department of Public Safety – Highway Safety Office
 
 

Sign #8

When adding up survey results for lifetime use of prescription pain pills, sedatives (Valium, Xanax, and sleeping pills), and “other stimulants” (Ritalin and Dexedrine), that number rises even more.  All these categories of prescription drugs are taking over marijuana as the new “gateway” drug.  Prescription Drugs are often experimented with before teens ever try marijuana.  Keep prescription drugs out of the hands of your family by locking up medications that are being used in your home and disposing of leftovers at your local police station. 


SOURCE:

SHARP Survey 2009

 
 
 
 
Sign #9


78% of people have prescription pain pills leftover.  But only 7% have used a police station medication dropbox.

There are 14 police stations in Salt Lake County that have Medication Drop-Boxes.  All boxes are accessible during regular business hours and are located in the lobby.  All donations are completely anonymous and require no direct interaction with police officers.  Removing leftover medications from your home protects your family and friends as well as the environment.  Medications disposed in the drop box will not contaminate our water systems; they are incinerated and channeled into electrical power.


SOURCE: 
University of Utah Neighborhood Action Coalition – Salt Lake City Prescription Pain Medication Telephone Survey 2010.  






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