Relevant connections between students

Connections, conversations, collaborating, and comprehending! 

 

 

Anni shares her feelings about what she is learning in school on My class work. She acknowledges having some problems with some parts of speech and many commenters share tips. Mrs. L tells about a time when she was in the seventh grade and her teacher made her do something “terrible”. She had to memorize all the prepositions but now today Mrs. L thinks she needs to remember to thank her teacher! She would have had trouble with prepositions if she had not done this. She also adds that it is a great way to impress people!  Anni was impressed and that led Anni to a renewed interest in learning all she could about prepositions!

 

  

 

Eddie learns from Literacy in ECE, Literacy in ECE learns from Eddie

Eddie’s post “Cat Purrs about Safety Issues” intrigued  university student, Literacy in ECE to ask “What are heeleys? . Literacy in ECE mused that maybe she had had her head in a book too long but she wanted to know. She also complemented Eddie on using a cat to speak his thoughts. Note the back and forth interchange between the two where each is learning from the other. By the way, if you are not in the “know” like Eddie, heeleys are shoes that have wheels in the heels.

 

 

  

 

Emmy scores as a writer and as a soccer player

 Emmy’s soccer story was reinforced by Ms. Outspoken's praise of  the beginning, the title, the details, and the closing. This was great reinforcement for a budding author who is sharing one of her passions.

 

 

 

 

Legislators educate the kids, the kids educate the legislators

Johnny interviewed Representative Roger Bruce at a legislative event at the Georgia Depot. He blogged about his answers. Johnny was lobbying the legislator to add water to the lunch menu for school kids. Check out the interview here.

 

 

 

 Seeing two sides and differing views

Lindsey sparks engaging thoughts and ideas between teachers and students on her Mighty Brains Head to Recess post.

 Miss Kay shares how as a kindergarten teacher her students only get 15 minutes once a week of recess. She concurs with Lindsey on the need for recess.

EUD wonders if too many recess periods might become boring and challenges Lindsey’s thinking here. Lindsey is beginning to see two sides of an argument and how to prepare to respond well to the differing views.

 

 

This post on M.V.’s science session springboarded a lot of thinking and follow-up from M.V.  Having the commenters learn from him was extremely motivating to M.V. as he became very creative in his posts that followed. This was in a large part due to the encouragement and reinforcement he was receiving from the university readers/commenters.

M.V. even dedicated one of his posts to Cordelia who gave him an idea for a future post.




 From blethering to authoring

 It all started with a post on “Blether!!” Literacy in ECE  was clueless about the meaning. She did a search on Wikipedia. It did not come up.  She was pleased to learn this word from Mary.

Mary has used Wikipedia all year long while blogging but it took a comment from Literacy in ECE to let Mary know that she could be an author on the World Wide Web. Literacy in ECE provided a step-by-step guide on how to do just that and Mary was delighted. Now that’s empowerment!

 

 
Back & forth comments stimulate the conversations

Mia’s post on “Overweight; Overplay” projected her as a proponent in having P.E. every day.  She backed up her beliefs with sound arguments and that brought forth comments from university students Virtuous, Blythe and Cordelia. A rally of back and forth questions and answers ensued.  There was even reminiscing about traditional playground games like green light and red light which are still played today. Many others besides the university students joined these stimulating conversations.

 

 

 

"Pizzaz or Pizza" Sparks the Dialogue

Michael post on Pizzaz or Pizza grabs readers attention with his lively imagination and forthright writing. Notice the good agree/disagree interchange between Ed and Michael. Cynthia and Michael also compare and contrast their experiences with CNN which gives lots of food for thought for all of them!

 



 

Poetry & Quotes are inspiring 

Rosalinda’s poem “I Am”   caused Virtuous to remember how important writing was to her growing up. They were able to share experiences. This quote from Virtuous “The power is in the pen and it will follow your command.” stuck with Rosalinda as she continued to blog and improve in her reading, thinking, and writing experiences.

 

T.K. tosses out tough questions: Cynthia fields good answers 

 T.K. and Cynthia comment back and forth about their love of learning about cells in science and the joy of using a microscope on T.K.'s post Learning Science. T.K. is amazed that they know the same thing and he had only been in Science for one month. Then he asks Cynthia if a dog or a cat is right or left-handed. Cynthia is not sure but promises to  observe her own pets carefully. Then she goes on to teach T.K. a new vocabulary word – ambidextrous. A word that fascinated him and one he will be sure to remember because Cynthia made it authentic for him. So score one for vocabulary!

 


A little push poses possibilities  

Tina blogs about Kids+Computers=Education which piques the interest of Peace and Blythe. Tina had given many reasons why she thought students should have more time on computers but the university students helped push her thinking by posing thoughts and possiblilities which got Tina thinking a little deeper.

 

 

 

 

 

Lively give and take to learn from each other

 Victoria created a graphic representation of what blogging meant to her. Anna had many similar feelings about blogging and made some good comparisons for the two to ponder. Anna was extremely interested in how Victoria created her chart. Victoria provided a link to the program she used and followed up with a question asking Anna if she found all the answers to her questions.  Such great "give  & take" adds up to  quality  learning!
 

 

 

 

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