Lake Michigan Pollution Scenario: Writing Policy Papers

  • What makes policies so difficult to design, support, and enact? This "Lake Michigan Pollution" scenario invites students to consider why it is that perfectly reasonable policies--for example, that Lake Michigan should be cleaned up--are often not enacted.
  • 1: Gateway Activity: The Prezi presentation here, "A Hot Dog Stand in Adams Park," accompanies the Word document below, "Scenario Pollution...". Together, these support an activity that helps students  navigate, on a small scale, the type of value-laden prioritizing that drives policy statements. Students should discover, by role-playing in this dilemma-driven scenario, that even the most "clear" right-and-wrong policies are often situations in which competing values must be juggled, compared, and compromised. 
  • 2: Practicing Thesis Policy Statements: Students in small groups eventually write a model policy statement, like the one below, to practice the language of policy recommendations. They expand this statement writing by composing, in small groups, persuasive letters that recommend a policy of action, such as the ones modeled in the letters featured on the "Prom" and "Football in Red Lake" page.
    •  
  • 3: Research and Sharing: Students work in groups to actively read and respond to non-fiction texts detailing a variety of issues driving one particular aspect of Lake Michigan pollution, that is, the Asian carp threat and human response to it. This activity is designed to guide students in the processes of summarizing, evaluating, and synthesizing sources.
  • 4: Writing and Acting: Students work in pairs to construct editorials letters making policy suggestions to address the Asian carp situation.
ĉ
Nicole Boudreau Smith,
Apr 29, 2012, 9:16 PM
ĉ
Nicole Boudreau Smith,
Apr 29, 2012, 7:31 PM
ĉ
Nicole Boudreau Smith,
Apr 29, 2012, 1:38 PM
Comments