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Native Beauty Crossvine


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Crossvine in its native habitat

Crossvine in natural habitat



Native Beauty Crossvine (Bignonia Capreolata) 45 Seeds

Cold-hardy semi-evergreen perennial vine with red throat and yellow flower petals. 
Drought-resistant and non-aggressive when established. 
Growing zones 5-9.  
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Meta-Tags: Perennial Flowering Vine,   Attracts Hummingbirds,  Prolific Floral Display with Spring & Summer Blooms, Tropical Vine Appearance, Cold Hardy Semi-Evergreen, Growing zones 5-9,  Bignonia Capreolata Crossvine, Mail Order Seed Package.  


Page Contents
  • Product Description
  • Native Range
  • Hardiness Zones
  • Planting Instructions


Product Description

This vine "has it all" with eye-catching flowers, attractive semi-evergreen leaves, and a non-invasive growth behavior (unlike the trumpet-creepers). 
 
A pod containing about 40 to 50 seeds is offered for sale to provide you with a generous quantity of vines. 

 

Grow in combination with purple or blue clematis for a knock-out color combination!

 

Crossvine is a hummingbird magnet and attracts butterflies!

  

What a show!!!
 
The semi-evergreen leaves will remain for the fall and winter if they’re allowed to “harden-off” before a hard freeze.  Then they’ll turn dark purple.  The leaves are more likely to fall off in the colder growing zones.
 
 

Crossvine receives excellent reviews from gardening experts and admirers.

 

“Crossvine could be called the “Holy Grail” of vines, being a non-aggressive perennial evergreen with blossoms that come out periodically in spring, summer, and fall.” [1*]

 

“While crossvine is fast growing, it doesn’t seem desirous of taking over the world...This would be an ideal plant to use to soften the backside of the wooden fences surrounding many of our back yards. It grows just as easily on a chain-link fenceFew nurseries stock the plant….” [2*]

 

Crossvine likes fertile, well-drained soils.  It has considerable drought tolerance and few insect or disease problems.  It needs protection from browsing rabbits and deer.
 
This variety originated from the colder regions of zone 6 -- from the limestone palisades of central Kentucky and the mountains of southwestern Virginia -- not from Texas or southern Georgia.  It’s probably more cold tolerant than southern cultivars such as Tangerine Beauty.  
 
The vines take about 2-3 years to get established from seeds then grow rapidly after that.  They’ll scamper up a pine tree, over an arbor, or along a fence in a sunny location or in partial shade.  Prune and train as desired.
 
 Crossvine plant in third year was started from a seed in a 1 gallon patio container.

 
 

A customer's crossvine after six years of growth.  Note peonies about to bloom on the right.


An un-pruned, un-trained vine can grow up to 50 feet long after many years.  It’s comparable to wisteria in size but much less aggressive. 

Like most types of vines, crossvine is not recommended to grow on buildings.


 
Crossvine is a PlantWise [3*] native alternative for:

 

    Hedera helix (English ivy)

    Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle)

    Wisteria floribunda (Japanese wisteria)

Crossvine plant in its native-Kentucky-environment climbs some scrub-brush and produces showy tropical-looking blooms.

 

It’s an environmentally-responsible-alternative to some of the habitat-invading-plants sold at your local-nursery. 
 
In summary, what an attractive and desirable vine that has been overlooked in the American landscape!

 

Now is your chance to buy!!!  (shopping cart is at top of the page)

Please note planting instructions at bottom of page.
 

 
*Footnote References:

 

1) “Vines provide vertical landscape elements”, Go San Angelo Standard Times, John Begnaud, Posted April 7, 2007

 

2)   University of Arkansas Plant of the Week: Crossvine, By: Gerald Klingaman, retired Extension Horticulturist – Ornamentals Extension News - June 9, 2006

 

3) PlantWise means it's a desirable habitat-friendly native plant recommended to replace one or more invasive ornamental landscape plants according to theLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.




Native Range

The map link provided below shows states where bignonia capreolata has been reported (dark green) and counties where the species has been sited (light green):



 
Hardiness Zones

 



Bignonia capreolata is hardy in these areas:

 

AlamedaCA

AlamoCA

AlsipIL

American CanyonCA

AngwinCA

AntiochCA

BaltimoreMD

Bayside, NY

BronxNY

BrooklynNY

BrownsvilleTX

CantonMI

ChicagoIL

CiceroIL

College PointNY

ConneautOH

CoronaNY

DanvilleCA

DetroitMI

DorsetOH

East ClaridonOH

East ElmhurstNY

EcorseMI

ElmhurstNY

Elmwood ParkIL

ElyriaOH

EssexCA

Evergreen ParkIL

FawnskinCA

FerndaleMI

FlorenceSC

FlushingNY

FontanaCA

Forest FallsCA

Forest HillsNY

Fort EustisVA

Fresh Meadows, NY

Glen BurnieMD

Gwynn OakMD

Harper WoodsMI

Harrison TownshipMI

Hunt ValleyMD

Jackson Heights, NY

LeasburgNC

LexingtonNC

LibertyNC

LinwoodNC

Little Neck, NY

LudlowCA

MacombMI

MarysvilleMI

MaspethNY

MemphisMI

MercedesTX

Middle VillageNY

MissionTX

ModestoCA

Moreno ValleyCA

MorgantownWV

Mount ClemensMI

New BaltimoreMI

New HavenMI

New YorkNY

Newport NewsVA

North RidgevilleOH

North Street, MI

Oakland GardensNY

OlmitoTX

PenitasTX

PharrTX

PhelanCA

PhiladelphiaPA

PikesvilleMD

Pinon HillsCA

Port IsabelTX

ProgresoTX

RedlandsCA

Rego ParkNY

RialtoCA

RidgewoodNY

RimforestCA

RiverdaleIL

SaratogaCA

SoquelCA

Sparrows PointMD

Staten IslandNY

TaylorMI

Temperance, MI

Temple CityCA

TowsonMD

TrentonMI

Tres PinosCA

UplandCA

Virginia BeachVA

Walnut, CA

WatsonvilleCA

WayneMI

WestlandMI

WhitestoneNY

Whitmore LakeMI

 

 

 



 
Crossvine has been said to grow in the following regions:

Alabama:  Bessemer, Saraland, Vincent 
Arkansas : Ashdown, Little Rock, Morrilton 
Delaware: Wilmington 
Florida: Bartow, Dade City, Hollywood, New Port Richey, Palm Coast, Pensacola, Tallahassee
Georgia: Albany, Athens, Brunswick, Cornelia, Demorest, Hinesville 
Kentucky: Salvisa 
Louisiana: Abita Springs, Baton Rouge, Gonzales
Maryland: Gwynn Oak 
Mississippi: Columbus, Lumberton, Maben, Raymond, Saucier 
New Mexico: Hobbs 
New York: North Tonawanda 
North Carolina: Chapel Hill, Kure Beach, Statesville 
Ohio: Dundee 
Oklahoma: Hulbert, Norman 
Tennessee: Lewisburg 
Texas: Arlington, Austin, Canyon Lake, Crane, Desoto, Fate, Fort Worth, Jacksonville, Katy, Missouri City, Odessa, Pipe Creek, Round Rock, San Antonio, Tyler 
Virginia: Harrisonburg, Manassas
Washington: Kalama




Crossvine Planting Instructions
 
Store seeds in a cool, dry place until Spring planting season.   They do not need refrigeration.  
 
When planting season arrives spread the seeds on a paper towel, fold it over a few times, and place the tissue paper on a wet sponge.  Keep the sponge wet until the root tips emerge in a week or two.  Expect about 25% to 50% of the seeds to sprout.  Plant seed-sprouts about 1/4 inch deep in moist, fertile, well-drained soil.  Protect seedlings from browsing rabbits, and water occasionally.
 
Seeds can be planted directly in the ground before they sprout, but birds and rodents could feed on them.
 
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