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Uwe Mundlos

Uwe Mundlos (born 11 August 1973 in Jena, † November 4, 2011 in Eisenach)

1973

August 11
He is born on 11.08.1973 in Jena and grows up in orderly family relations. He has a brother. His mother was a shop assistant, and his father a professor at the University of Applied Sciences Jena. The parental home was located in an apartment block in the Max Steenbeck road in the Jena district Winzerla.[1]

1979

Unknown
Mundlos starts in the Polytechnic High School POS Magnus Poser.[2]He finished school with the completion of the tenth grade.[1] Mundlos had good grades, especially in scientific subjects.[3]

1987

Unknown
Mundlos was member of the Thalmann Pioneers and the Free German Youth FDJ.

1988

Unknown
From 1998 Mundlos first came to school 'with military-style hair and combat boots'.[2]

1989

Unknown
Mundlos leaves high school. After Mundlos has left school after the tenth grade, he is trained as a data processing clerk at Carl Zeiss.[2]

November
After the fall of the Berlin Wall it more and more radicalized.[4]

1991

September
This month the youth club Winzer-clan opened, which became the focal point of the Jena neo-Nazi scene.[3] Here Mundlos met regularly with the later NSU members and supporters Uwe Böhnhardt, Beate Zschäpe, Ralf Wohlleben, Holger Gerlach and André Kapke and formed the camaraderie of Jena, where he was deputy leader. "His worldview was shaped by the Nazis and the worship of Rudolf Hess".[1]

1994

Unknown
Since 1994, compared to Mundlos in several different states under investigation for sedition, violation of the Assembly Act (VersammlG), utilizing have been out of symbols of unconstitutional organizations, trespassing and resisting enforcement officials.[1]

5 April
Uwe Mundlos begins his compulsory military service at the Infantry Battalion 381 in the Kyffhaeuser Barracks in Bad Frankenhausen.[6]

1995

Unknown
Together with his friends Uwe and Beate Zschäpe Böhnhardt he belongs to the hard core of the anti-Antifa East Thuringia and the Thuringian Homeland Security from 1995. Since 1995 there has been a "division" of the "Blood & Honour" movement in the Federal German Republic, which originated in the UK.[1]

March
Mundlos is taken into custody, officials could search his apartment and discover there 15 records of NS music and pamphlets of the NPD. At the same time the Military Counterintelligence point Mundlos as suspected person. In March 1995, he is interrogated by MAD and asked "if he could perhaps tell the police or the constitutional protection agencies the known dates for attacks on asylum centers". Mundlos denied. MAD kept an observation record about Mundlos' contacts that was "properly" destroyed 15 years after he finished his military service.[6]

31 March
Mundlos leaves the military service.[1]

29 June
On 29 June 1995 Chemnitz District Court sentences him on charges of "making and holding of symbols of unconstitutional organizations" to 20 daily rates of a DM 30 fine.[1]
August 19
Mundlos takes part in a memorial march for Rudolf Hess in Schneverdingen[7]

1996

February 13
The District Court of Chemnitz has dropped penal agents for disseminating propaganda of unconstitutional organizations pursuant to § 86 of the Criminal Code (CC) in case 250 Js33343/94 against Mundlos. The penalty was 20 daily rates of 30 DM[1]

August
Mundlos rents a dorm room in Ilmenau. He attended the College of Ilmenau, to make up for high school.[1]

1 November
Mundlos is forbidden from entering the memorial of the Buchenwald concentration camp, because he had entered the terrain together with Uwe Böhnhardt dressed in SA-like uniforms.[5]

9 November
On the anniversary of Kristallnacht the police search his and find hatchets, batons, a gas gun, a throwing star, combat knife, an air pistol and a poster with Wehrmacht motif.[1]

1997

Autumn
In late 1997, the nationwide "B & H" youth organization "White Youth" is founded in Thuringia, the members want to organize younger people into the scene and retain older comrades. It has about 40 members, who come from the far-right skinhead scene and are partly members of right-wing bands or the publisher or relevant fanzines. The NSU members are also present.[1]

1998

January 28
The Gera prosecutors issue arrest warrants for the NSU members, and they disappear.[3] While living in the underground Mundlos, nicknamed Max, took the identity card of Max Florian B. to possess a false passport, and had his birth certificate.[3]

2007

Unknown
Mundlos made multiple vacation trips to the island of Fehmarn with Böhnhardt and Zschäpe, on the camping site Wulfener Hals where they rented a caravan.[3]

2008

May
Mundlos, Böhnhardt and Zschäpe move to a house Frühlingsstraße 26 in Zwickau's district Weissenborn, a house neo-Nazi Matthias D. had rented[3]

2011

November 4
On 04.11.2011 at 09:15, Uwe Böhnhardt and Uwe Mundlos rob the savings bank on Nordplatz 17 in Eisenach and loot 71,915 euros. They then flee on bicycles to a mobile home, which they drive in the district belonging to Eisenach Stregda.[1] On the run they are discovered by the police. After shooting at the officers Mundlos and Böhnhardt kill themselves. The police find Mundlos and Böhnhardt dead in an RV in the street Schafrain in Eisenach.[7]

Sources:
[1] Gerhard Schäfer, Volkhard Wache, Gerhard Meiborg: Gutachten zum Verhalten der Thüringer Behörden und Staatsanwaltschaften bei der Verfolgung des „Zwickauer Trios”. Ministry of Internal Affairs, County Thuringia. 15 May 2012, retrieved 4 Oktober 2012 (PDF; 1,7 MB).
[2] Christian Fuchs, John Goetz: Die Zelle. Rechter Terror in Deutschland. Reinbek, 2012. ISBN 978-3-498-02005-7.
[3] Maik Baumgärtner, Marcus Böttcher: Das Zwickauer Terror-Trio. Ereignisse, Szene, Hintergründe. Berlin 2012, page 18, 20, 24, 69, 177, 182, 211
[4] Rainer Erb: "Das Zwickauer Terror–Trio". Brandenburgische Landeszentrale für politische Bildung, February 2012.
[5] Thüringer Landesamt für Verfassungsschutz: Erkenntnisse zu den Personen Zschäpe, Beate; Böhnhardt, Uwe und Mundlos, Uwe. Zusammenfassung für den Generalbundesanwalt. Erfurt, 30 November 2011.
[6] http://www.die-linke-thl.de/fileadmin/lv/dokumente/presse/sonstiges/2012.06.20_Chronik_NSU_16.pdf
[7] Zufrieden mit Soldat Mundlos: Bundeswehr kümmerte sich nicht n-tv.de vom 7. November 2012
[8] "Mundlos erschoss Böhnhardt". Hamburger Abendblatt, 21. November 2011, abgerufen am 4. Oktober 2012.