NATALIE BAU




Assistant Professor
Luskin School of Public Affairs
UCLA
nbau@ucla.edu


 


     
 I am an assistant professor at UCLA, a CEPR research affiliate, and a CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar.  I am interested in development and education economics with a special emphasis on the industrial organization of education markets.  You can find my CV here and a list of my papers and ongoing projects below. 


Working Papers

School Competition and Product Differentiation
      Related popular writing: World Bank Development Impact Blog

Negotiating a Better Future: How Interpersonal Skills Facilitate Inter-Generational Investment (With Nava Ashraf, Corinne Low, and Kathleen McGinn)
       Coverage: NPRWorld Bank Development Impact Blog

Can Policy Change Culture? Government Pension Plans and Traditional Kinship Practices
    Formerly distributed as "Can Policy Crowd Out Culture?" and  "Cultural Norms, Strategic Behavior, and Human Capital                      Investment." 
    Coverage:  World Bank Development Impact Blog

Are Bad Public Schools Public 'Bads?' Test Scores and Civic Values in Public and Private Schools (with Tahir Andrabi, Jishnu Das, and Asim Khwaja)

Publications

Bride Price and Female Education (with Nava Ashraf, Nathan Nunn, and Alessandra Voena), Forthcoming in the Journal of Political Economy.
    Related popular writing: IGC blogThe ConversationCIFAR newsletter

Teacher Value-Added in a Low-Income Country (with Jishnu Das), Forthcoming in  AEJ: Economic Policy.
    Formerly distributed as "The Misallocation of Pay and Productivity in the Public Sector: Evidence from the Labor Market for            Teachers."
    Working paper with more discussion of contract teacher policy.
    Related popular writing: VoxDev , World Bank Digest, The Economist



Research in Progress

Misallocation and Capital Market Integration: Evidence From India (with Adrien Matray)

Affirmative Action and Student Effort (with Mitra Akhtari and Jean-William Lalibert
é)

Brain vs. Brawn: Child Labor, Human Capital Investment, and the Role of Dynamic Complementarities (with Martin Rotemberg, Manisha Shah, and Bryce Steinberg)