Murano Labels 3

Napoleone Martinuzzi for Zecchin Martinuzzi 
The mark is very small and easy to miss. I do not know if Martinuzzi was the only one to use this acid stamp.
 
AV Mazzega
AV Mazzega primarily makes lighting, but also make vases. This signature was on the base of a vase.
 
IVR Mazzega
These are three examples of Mazzega labels used. I do not know the dates. The IVR labels must be post-1950 -- the year the company adopted the name IVR Mazzega.
 
Angelo Nason
Rarely seen label. Photo is courtesy of Ray Cota.

Vincenzo Nason
Round plastic label probably from the 1970-80s. Photo is courtesy of Chris Cooper.
 
Salviati
This label was used from the late 1950s - early 1960s. Photo is courtesy of Ken Nicol.

These are three examples of foil on paper labels used by Salviati. They were probably all used in the 1960s-early 70s. Many of their things during this time also have Salviati engraved on bottom. (The yellow Made In Italy sticker seen in the second photo can be found on glass by many companies. It is a generic sticker.)
 
Archimede Seguso
Scalloped red "Made in Italy" seen on some Archimede Seguso pieces made in the late 1940 and 1950s.

The red, circular scalloped foil on paper label was used from the 1950s-70s. The letters are silver. Often they are seen with a scalloped white stock label, such as the picture on the bottom. Note that the work MURANO is in the middle of the label. The AVeM label is very similar, but has the word Italy in the middle. These labels were used on mass produced objects made for export.
 
This oval scalloped label was used on during the same years as the round one was. Heiremans writes it was used on "artistic glass" production.
 
Store label on an Archimede Seguso bird. Photo is courtesy of Pam Townsend.
 
The 1980s saw the advent of the smooth oval red label. The plastic oval label was probably introduced in the late 1970s. Artistic glass from the 1970s and later was often signed as shown.
 
Seguso Dalla Venezia
 
Seguso Dalla Venezia operated in Murano 1951-65. Photo on the right is courtesy of Thomas Wilson.
 
 
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