Reading to Learn

Summarizing Shore is Fun

     Reading to Learn

 

Rationale:

    The ultimate goal of reading is comprehension, and once students have learned fluency and accuracy, they are ready to take on the challenging goal of comprehension. This lesson introduces students to a helpful strategy known as summarization, which will help them read to learn and to understand. Students will learn to delete trivial and unnecessary information and focus of important parts of a text. 

 

Materials:

·      Class set of the article "Where do Seashells come from?"

·      Poster with the rules of summarization written on it

·      Assessment chart for each student (for teacher use)

·      Colored marker for each student

·      Lined paper for each student

·      Projector

Procedures:

1.       Say: "Who has ever read an article or a book, and told a friend about what you read? Do you read them the whole book, or do you just tell them the important parts of what you read? You only tell them important parts of the story! This is called giving your friend a summary of the book or article. Summarization is a helpful strategy good readers use to help comprehend or understand what you are reading. If you can summarize a book or article, it is a good sign that you are able to understand what you’ve read!"

2.        Say: “Before we begin to practice summarization, let's review what we have learned about oceans so far this week. Early this week we said that there are 5 oceans, what are they? (Call on student.) Yes! There is the Pacific, Southern, Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian. Yesterday we talked about the largest ocean. Who can tell me what the largest ocean is? (Call on student). Very good, the largest ocean on Earth is the Pacific Ocean, and it covers around 30% of the Earth’s surface. Who can tell me what the deepest part of the ocean is called? (Call on student). Yes! The Mariana Trench is the deepest known area of Earth’s oceans and it has a deepest point of around 11000 metres.

3.       Say: “Now, let's talk more about summarization. Everybody take out a marker and a sheet of paper. Fold your piece of paper and fold in it into three. Then staple the pieces to make a booklet. Okay, now let's look at our "Rules of Summarizing" poster. Who can read me what the first rule of summarizing is? (Call on student). Yes, the first rule of summarizing is to delete the trivia, or unimportant information. We don’t want to keep any repeated information. Everybody write this rule on the first page of your booklet. It can be very helpful to cross out important information if you can mark on the article you are reading, but you are reading in a book you will probably have to make a mental note that certain parts may not be as important as others. This will help you to understand the message the author is trying to tell you. Let's look at the second rule. The second rule is to find the important information. Everybody write this rule on the second page. When you find something that is important in the book or article you are reading, underline or highlight the sentence so that you can go back and remember that it must be important. The third rule of summarization is to make a topic sentence. Everybody write this rule on the third page. Making a topic sentence can be very challenging because most texts don't have topic sentences incorporated. A topic sentence combines all of the important information in a short, condensed way so that you are able to summarize and comprehend the paragraph you read.”

 4.     Say: "Now we are going to practice summarizing with an article called "Where do Seashells Come From?" Have you ever thought about where seashells come from? I know I have! According to this mystery article, they aren’t just there, they are created by something special. Let's read more to find out! Let's look at the first paragraph of the article together: "Seashells are the external skeletons of a class of marine animals called Mollusks. Where people have our skeletons on the inside of our bodies, mollusks have theirs on the outside of theirs. This way they help protect the creatures from predators, strong currents and storms, help camouflage the animal, and do many other things. Seashells are primarily made of calcium, a hard mineral, as our own bones are.” "Let's look at one word that stands out to me: external. Let me use it in a sentence to see if you can use context clues to figure out what it means. A turtle has an external shell that protects it and gives it shelter. What does it mean when it says shells are external? I want you to turn and talk to the person next to you and come up with a sentence using the word external." (wait time) "Can anyone tell me what the word external means? Who can tell me the sentence you and your partner came up with?" Call on students. "Awesome! So we figured out that external means on the outside of something." 

 5.     Say: “Ok, now I want everyone to watch me as I use my rules to summarize this paragraph. (Pull out a pre-made booklet with 3 pages). Let's look at the first sentence: “Seashells are the external skeletons of a class of marine animals called Mollusks.” Do we think it is important that we know this information? I would say yes. I think this is an important fact so I am going to write this on my second page in my booklet. Let’s look at the second sentence and third sentences. Where people have our skeletons on the inside of our bodies, mollusks have theirs on the outside of theirs. This way they help protect the creatures from predators, strong currents and storms, help camouflage the animal, and do many other things. I do not think sentence number two is very important because the first sentence already states that the shell in on the outside of a mollusk’s body. Sentence three, however, tells us what the shell does so it is important. I am going to write sentence number two under the first page and three on my second page of my booklet. Let's look at the next sentence- Seashells are primarily made of calcium, a hard mineral, as our own bones are. Okay, I see some repeated information here. It repeats that seashells are like skeletons. I am going to write this information on my first page. I am going to mark an X over the rest of the information and write it in my first column because I don’t think it is important.”

 6.      Say: “Now that we have finished the first paragraph let's try and see if we can come up with a topic sentence. Remember, a topic sentence is one sentence that explains what the whole paragraph is talking about. I am going to look at the parts I have on my second page for the important information I wrote down. Look at your second page to see what important information that we wrote down. I have “Seashells are the external skeletons of a class of marine animals called Mollusks. This way they help protect the creatures from predators, strong currents and storms, help camouflage the animal, and do many other things.” I would make this a topic sentence by saying: Seashells are external skeletons of an animal called a Mollusk. It protects them from predators, strong currents and storms, helps camouflage them, and do many other things. Now I have all my important information and the summary of the paragraph I just read. Does anybody have any questions?”

 7.     Say: “Now, I am going to let you summarize each of the remaining paragraphs. Remember to use your booklet with the columns to help you break up the information. You can also look at our summarizing poster as well if you need help! Come up with one topic sentence for each paragraph. When you are finished, I want you to staple the article to the back of your book, and turn it in to me.”

 8.      Assessment: I will review each student's booklets to determine if they could successfully summarize the different paragraphs. I will use the assessment checklist to record each child's grade. Topic sentences may vary slightly, but I will be looking to see if they child included the important information in each.

Comprehension Questions:

1. What happens when a Mollusk dies?

2. What are the two different types of Mollusks?

3. Who else might live in a seashell?

Assessment Checklist:

Student Name: ___________________________

 1. Did the student fill out the chart on his/her paper?                                

2.Did the students come up with topic sentences for the remaining paragraphs?

3.Did the student successfully delete unimportant/redundant information?

4.Did the student successfully identify important parts?

5.Did the student use the important information to come up with topic sentence?

 

References:

1.     Seashells and Such, "Where do Seashells come from?”

http://www.seashellsandsuch.com/articles/wherecomefrom.php

2. Carter, Lauren: Flying Through Summarization 

https://sites.google.com/site/ctrdlaurencarter/reading-to-learn

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