Graduate Research Assistantship available
PhD position focused on applying novel analytical techniques and approaches to evaluate climate, land-use, and disturbance interactions

 

            The Paleoecology Lab at Montana State University is seeking a motivated graduate student to conduct research on evaluating drivers of past environmental change. The paleoecology lab and collaborators develop multi-proxy datasets (pollen, charcoal, diatoms, isotopes, tree rings, fire scars and forest demographic data) to examine past environmental change at a network of sites worldwide. Our research strives to better understand historical drivers of environmental change in order to anticipate future change and guide effective natural resource management. We seek a motivated and enthusiastic individual with strong analytical skills (e.g., familiarity with standard ecological statistics, R-program, python programming) and a background in ecology, archeology, physical geography or climatology. 

            A successful candidate will conduct field research in the northwestern US, evaluate multi-proxy datasets to better understand past environmental change and lead peer-reviewed publications. Students interested in applying to begin graduate studies in 2017 should send a brief statement of interest and CV to Dave McWethy (davemcwethy@gmail.com). The deadline for submitting a graduate school application to the Department of Earth Sciences is January 15th, 2017. Support for the assistantship (3 years) includes a combination of research assistantships (RA) and teaching assistantships (TA) provided by the Department of Earth Sciences and funding support from the National Science Foundation, Joint Fire Science Program, USGS and USDA. Desired qualifications include: completion of a MS degree in related field (ecology, archeology, physical geography, climatology); application of statistics to ecological datasets; programming experience in R, python or other. Well-qualified BS students may apply. Experience working with lake sediments and/or tree samples (tree rings and fire scars) beneficial but not required.

For more information contact Dave McWethy (davemcwethy@gmail.com)